Regicide

Regicide Carl meets Annie Risk and falls for her Hurt by a recent relationship she resists becoming involved A chance find offers distraction Carl stumbles across part of a map to an unknown town He becomes c

  • Title: Regicide
  • Author: Nicholas Royle
  • ISBN: 9781907992001
  • Page: 494
  • Format: Paperback
  • Carl meets Annie Risk and falls for her Hurt by a recent relationship, she resists becoming involved A chance find offers distraction Carl stumbles across part of a map to an unknown town He becomes convinced it represents the city of his dreams, where ice skaters turn quintuple loops and trumpeters hit impossibly high notes where Annie Risk will agree to see him aCarl meets Annie Risk and falls for her Hurt by a recent relationship, she resists becoming involved A chance find offers distraction Carl stumbles across part of a map to an unknown town He becomes convinced it represents the city of his dreams, where ice skaters turn quintuple loops and trumpeters hit impossibly high notes where Annie Risk will agree to see him again But if he ever finds himself in the streets on his map, will they turn out to be the land of his dreams or the world of his worst nightmares British Fantasy Award winner Nicholas Royle has written a powerful story set in a nightmarish otherworld of fathers and sons, hopes and dreams, love and death.

    One thought on “Regicide”

    1. The first half of Regicide is a top-tier David Lynchian nightmare, and is easily 4-plus star material in my book. It concerns a man in London named Carl who, after walking a mysterious girl he just met back to her hotel, reality, or his perception of it, begins to break down. He gets totally lost even though he knows that part of London like the back of his hand, and finds himself answering a ringing phone in a seemingly abandoned house in the middle of a strangely quiet, almost desolate neighbo [...]

    2. Genuinely creepy, written as a narrative from the main character Carl, this is a constant blur between the ‘real life’ goings on and what is happening in his psyche. Carl meets a girl, walks her back to her hotel, gets a little bit lost then from walking himself back things just start to go weird. Carls perception of reality is broken down bit by bit and his ever more apparent obsessions such as Siouxie Sioux, the 80’s new wave Manchester music scene and the book Un Régicide by French Nov [...]

    3. I picked this up based on a blurb about a man who finds himself haunted by a mysterious city behind the scenes of the city, a city which intrudes at the edgelands and the in-between districts. What I didn't realise is that one of the non-areas used as an example is the elusive Hornsey, and that the protagonist is a massive fan of post-punk obscurities the Passage - both details highly relevant to my interests. However, there also seems to be a significant debt (including the title) to the nouvea [...]

    4. Regicide is a wonderfully strange book. There's a surreal sense to the locations and the interactions between characters. Nicholas Royle creates very engaging characters and intense situations that challenge the reader's sense of reality. This is what I consider slipstream fiction at its best - the reader is pulled into the book with such a strong sense of place and character, then repeatedly challenged to keep up with a rollercoastering plot where nothing is quite what it seems and even the nar [...]

    5. I started out quite enjoying this, but as it went on and got more caught up in the dystopia of the City I felt it lost its way. Then the last couple of scenes are a great big waste of paper -- sub-Outer Limits obligatory twist ending that might have worked on a story 1/10th the length of this one.Sadly, I can't recommend it, despite my early enthusiasm.

    6. If not for its brevity, this could well have ended up consigned to my Abandoned pile. The beginning is good - solid character work and a creeping sense of unease - but then it drops straight into weird fantasy, and the lack of context is disorienting and irritating, and Royle pulls off a couple of cliched twists near the end that any experienced writer should be ashamed of.

    7. A slow starting story featuring a protagonist who is just odd enough to make things interesting. As the story builds it turns into a guilt filled psychological fever dream and then decides its time to get really weird. A fun read but less than perfect and muddled in parts. Still well worth your time and effort.

    8. This is a book I found interesting rather than gripping. Although it does contain elements that might offer some hints of horror, it's really a more philosophical musing on loneliness, guilt and death.opionator.wordpress/2012/0

    9. Saw this book in the bookstore by the train station this morning and it caught my eye. It looks and sounds interesting. I might pick it up on my way home from work!18:17-edit: and I just did! :)

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *