The Volga Rises in Europe

The Volga Rises in Europe Although Italy was allied with Germany in World War II the Italian viewpoint on the war often differed sharply from that of the Germans Malaparte was an eyewitness to the campaigns in Finland the Uk

  • Title: The Volga Rises in Europe
  • Author: Curzio Malaparte
  • ISBN: 9781841580968
  • Page: 212
  • Format: Paperback
  • Although Italy was allied with Germany in World War II, the Italian viewpoint on the war often differed sharply from that of the Germans Malaparte was an eyewitness to the campaigns in Finland, the Ukraine, and Leningrad, and has left behind a moving account of many small incidents in the day to day conduct of the war

    One thought on “The Volga Rises in Europe”

    1. The only relatively independent war correspondent on the Eastern Front of WWII, Malaparte's eloquent and poetic prose (he was a novelist after all) shines through even in events which one suspects were somewhat embellished that tend to occur when no one else is around. It hardly matters, he gets the fundamental essence of the greatest man made disaster of all time and pulls no punches despite being at least somewhat in the employ of the Italian government before its fall. War writing effectively [...]

    2. Malaparte describes the beginning of the German campaign on the Ukrainian front, including the crossing of the Prut and Nistru rivers by the German and Romanian troops. On Nistru, they face the Stalin fortification line. In the book, one finds several essays on the siege of Leningrad. A good read, even though, at times, it becomes repetitive. Plenty of details about the landscape. Malaparte notes that the Russians collect all the dead bodies and the equipment from the battlefield. "It is, in sho [...]

    3. Truly remarkable piece of history and of writing. Malaparte was an OBSERVER type of war correspondent rather than an interviewer/reporter. I identify with that because in my journalism days I was also more of an observer than a reporter. This book, which precedes the semi-fictional "Kaputt," has lots of similarities and could be read in conjunction with that novel. In any event, his analysis of the Soviet "soul," if one can use that term, is quite incisive. The first half of the book, the campai [...]

    4. I was very excited to read this book, as the Italian contributions to Operation Barbarossa / invasion of Russia are poorly documented. This book fills some of the gaps, but does so in mediocre fashion. The writing is tolerable initially, but becomes quite repetitive by book's end. The subtle political nature of the book (the author was exiled to Russia by Mussolini) is quite visible to me, so it does tend to paint the events depicted in a darker, grimmer tone. While their role was small, the Ita [...]

    5. Boh, questo libro mi lascia perplesso. Belle descrizioni, ma poi poco mi rimane. Ero tentato di dargli 3 stelle

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