Christianity and the Social Crisis in the 21st Century: The Classic That Woke Up the Church

Christianity and the Social Crisis in the st Century The Classic That Woke Up the Church First published in Christianity and the Social Crisis outsold every other religious volume for three years and then became a mainstay for Christians and other religious people seriously interest

  • Title: Christianity and the Social Crisis in the 21st Century: The Classic That Woke Up the Church
  • Author: Walter Rauschenbusch Paul Raushenbush
  • ISBN: 9780060890278
  • Page: 144
  • Format: Hardcover
  • First published in 1907, Christianity and the Social Crisis outsold every other religious volume for three years and then became a mainstay for Christians and other religious people seriously interested in social justice, inspiring leaders such as Reinhold and Richard Niebuhr, Martin Luther King Jr Mahatma Gandhi, and Bishop Desmond Tutu Christianity and the Social CrisFirst published in 1907, Christianity and the Social Crisis outsold every other religious volume for three years and then became a mainstay for Christians and other religious people seriously interested in social justice, inspiring leaders such as Reinhold and Richard Niebuhr, Martin Luther King Jr Mahatma Gandhi, and Bishop Desmond Tutu Christianity and the Social Crisis in the 21st Century brings this classic to a new generation with the addition of new essays by leading religious thinkers who have continued the legacy of Walter Rauschenbusch and the Social Gospel Movement Phyllis Trible responding to The Historical Roots of Christianity Tony Campolo responding to The Social Aims of Jesus Joan Chittister responding to The Social Impetus of Primitive Christianity Stanley Hauerwas responding to Why Has Christianity Never Undertaken the Work of Social Reconstruction Cornel West responding to The Present Crisis James A Forbes Jr responding to The Stake of the Church in the Social Movement Jim Wallis responding to What to Do

    One thought on “Christianity and the Social Crisis in the 21st Century: The Classic That Woke Up the Church”

    1. Walter Rauschenbusch had two jobs in 1907, when he wrote Christianity and the Social Crisis: one was as a professor of church history, and the other was as minister to a congregation of immigrants in Hell's Kitchen, New York City.The combination led him to an incisive yet nuanced view of the church and its role in American society at a time of incredible deprivation and inequality. And makes him a singularly important person to read 110 years later. Consider these quotes:p.5: The force that woul [...]

    2. An Allegory of the 19th Century Walter Rauschenbusch begins the fifth chapter of Christianity and the Social Crisis with a poetic allegory of the 19th Century. Upon the end of that century, Rauschenbusch imagines the 19th century descending into “the vaulted chamber of the Past”, where previous centuries congregate to discuss the perils and pieties of their respective eras. With unprecedented material success accumulated in the wake of the Industrial Revolution, the 19th Century metaphorical [...]

    3. An amazing social re-framing of the relationship between church and society throughout history. Many of Rauschenbusch's insights have gut-punching relevance even over 100 years after he wrote them. (Note-- I didn't read the edition with additional essays, unfortunately. I'm rocking the Harper Torchbooks 1964 edition.)Rauschenbusch was a visionary socialist before socialism became taboo through the real and perceived traumas of the 20th century. He here re-paints the entire history of Judaeo-Chri [...]

    4. The book was written in 1907 and this is the updated version with comments from Pastors or Theologians. I really enjoyed Rauschenbusch's perspective that the church needs to be aware of the social issues that are around us. Several of the chapters felt like they could have been written for exactly what is happening today.

    5. A seminal work. Was the originating influence on the social gospel movement of the early 20th century. Is still worth reading - still valuable for the prophetic call for social justice. Only some of Rauschenbusch's language is outdated. He was a self-proclaimed socialist and spoke of true Christian "communism" as an ideal goal. Course, this was written before the Russian revolution, and his communism was that of the monastery or "Brooks Farm" - not one imposed by a totalitarian state. His social [...]

    6. In my college education, the Social Gospel was an negative phrase spoken in criticism of anyone that cared more for social justice than soul-saving, an unhelpful dichotomy as I now understand it. When the Social Gospel was studied very briefly in seminary, it was quickly dismissed as being un-biblical, possessing an obvious triumphal modernism, and implicit Marxism. If there is one impression that stands out from Rauschenbusch's classic is that this man cannot be pigeon holed. This work displays [...]

    7. This was a challenging read full of ups and downs. I had not ventured much into strong liberal theology until now and this book left me quite informed. If you are willing to hear Rauschenbusch's distaste for Millenialism or Apocalypticism, Christian individualism or asceticism, then you will tap into an amazing call to challenge the injustice of our time. Although this collection of essays is from 1907, I continuously mistook the book as contemporary due to his accurate disections of today's soc [...]

    8. I'm so glad I came across Walter Rauschenbusch in my Baptist History textbook. Sadly, the social gospel caught on about as much as unsweet tea did in the early part of the nineteenth century. Fortunately a good man like Rauschenbusch didn't let that stop him, nor did he let the nay-sayers in the north (and there were many) dampen his spirit or his mission, either. Both of these things - his spirit and his mission - are needed more than ever today to a new breed of ministers and laity with the ve [...]

    9. First published in 1907, Rauschenbusch's plea is for a reformed Christianity based on the teachings of Jesus Christ and emphasizing not just individual conversion but also conversion of society as a whole in line with the ideals of the Kingdom of God, of which Jesus spoke so much. He calls for a spirit of Christian empathy for the poor and lower classes in order to bring about an equality envisioned by the early church. It's a passionate book, geared toward the excesses of the Gilded Age but app [...]

    10. A great read about the history and sweep of Protestantism in the early 20th century. Rauschenbusch not only offers an interesting historical perspective on the Bible (he focuses on the prophetic aspect of calling society to bring justice) he motivates his readers to take action and bring change in their communities. For anyone interested in a history or summation of the Social Gospel, this is a must read.

    11. This 1907 American book is on my "to-read" list after James Calvin Davis in In Defense of Civility said it "outsold every other religious text for a three-year period."

    12. An one hundred old classic on the importance of social concern and the church that is as relevant today as it was when published in 1907. Following the example of Jesus and the tradition of the social prophets of the Old Testament, Rauschenbush clearly challenges the church to step into the gap and in doing so, bring need change to our society.

    13. Added by Barbara.This is the classic call to social justice in Christianity published in 1907 and updated for now. While the modern additions probably don't exceed 50 pages, the book is interesting both historically and as a means to put our drive for social justice into perspective.

    14. Flaws and all, this is a classic for a reason. Not only a compelling and prophetic work, but a blast to read: his reading of the Gospels was ahead of his time, and there's a quotable line on every page. You can't help but love the man and his vision.

    15. This could have been written just 4 years ago, but it wasn't. It was written 100 years ago and seems just as telling and foretelling now as it was then.

    16. Amazing to find a book on 'spirituality' or moral conduct or to shift our paradigm of thought and provoke us to action, that even 100 years after it is written, is relevant to current times.

    17. Just absolutely fantastic reflections on contemporary society and Walter Rauschenbusch. The Church would be forever grateful to heed the lessons of Christ energized by Walter.

    18. Good book; it sort of started the "social gospel" movement of the 20th century. This version marks the 100 year anniversary of its publication and is updated with 2007 commentary.

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