Anna Karénine

Anna Kar nine La qu te d absolu s accorde mal aux convenances hypocrites en vigueur dans la haute soci t p tersbourgeoise de cette fin du XIXe si cle Anna Kar nine en fera la douloureuse exp rience Elle qui ne sait

  • Title: Anna Karénine
  • Author: Leo Tolstoy Sylvie Luneau
  • ISBN: 9782070392520
  • Page: 464
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • La qu te d absolu s accorde mal aux convenances hypocrites en vigueur dans la haute soci t p tersbourgeoise de cette fin du XIXe si cle Anna Kar nine en fera la douloureuse exp rience Elle qui ne sait ni mentir ni tricher l antith se d une Bovary ne peut ressentir qu un profond m pris pour ceux qui condamnent au nom de la morale sa passion adult re Et en premier liLa qu te d absolu s accorde mal aux convenances hypocrites en vigueur dans la haute soci t p tersbourgeoise de cette fin du XIXe si cle Anna Kar nine en fera la douloureuse exp rience Elle qui ne sait ni mentir ni tricher l antith se d une Bovary ne peut ressentir qu un profond m pris pour ceux qui condamnent au nom de la morale sa passion adult re Et en premier lieu son mari, l incarnation parfaite du monde auquel il appartient, lui plus soucieux des apparences que v ritablement pein par la trahison d Anna Le drame de cette femme intelligente, sensible et s duisante n est pas d avoir succomb la passion d vorante que lui inspire le comte Vronski, mais de lui avoir tout sacrifi , elle, sa vie de femme, sa vie de m re Vronski, finalement lass , retrouvera les plaisirs de la vie mondaine Dans son insondable solitude, Anna, qui ne peut para tre ses c t s, aura pour seule arme l humiliante jalousie pour faire vivre les derniers souffles d un amour en perdition Mais sa qu te est vaine, c est une femme perdue Lena c Gravis et Jocelyn Bl riot

    One thought on “Anna Karénine”

    1. As a daughter of a Russian literature teacher, it seems I have always known the story of Anna Karenina: the love, the affair, the train - the whole shebang. I must have ingested the knowledge with my mother's milk, as Russians would say.My grandpa had an old print of a painting hanging in his garage. A young beautiful mysterious woman sitting in a carriage in wintry Moscow and looking at the viewer through her heavy-lidded eyes with a stare that combines allure and deep sadness. "Who's that?" I [...]

    2. In the beginning, reading Anna Karenin can feel a little like visiting Paris for the first time. You’ve heard a lot about the place before you go. Much of what you see from the bus you recognize from pictures and movies and books. You can’t help but think of the great writers and artists who have been here before you. You expect to like it. You want to like it. But you don’t want to feel like you have to like it. You worry a little that you won’t. But after a few days, you settle in, and [...]

    3. WARNING: This is not a strict book review, but rather a meta-review of what reading this book led to in my life. Please avoid reading this if you're looking for an in depth analysis of Anna Karenina. Thanks. I should also mention that there is a big spoiler in here, in case you've remained untouched by cultural osmosis, but you should read my review anyway to save yourself the trouble.I grew up believing, like most of us, that burning books was something Nazis did (though, of course, burning Dis [...]

    4. Everyone has their crazy reasons for reading a book. I was never really planning to read "Anna Karenina" in my lifetime at all. Alas, I saw a trailer of the 2012 film recently and it was breath taking! Something about Keira Knightley is art. Something I cannot pinpoint as a mere mortal, but she always has the knack to make me believe that characters could live and breathe beyond the books. So why didn't I watch the full movie? For the stupid reason that I can't sit still just being a passive aud [...]

    5. In lieu of a proper review of my favorite book, and in addition to the remark that it would be more aptly named Konstantin Levin, I present to you the characters of Anna Karenina in a series of portraits painted by dead white men.Anna Karenina (Lady Agnew of Lochnaw by John Singer Sargent)Alexei Karenin (Portrait of Edouard Manet by Henri Fantin-Latour)Alexei Vronsky (Study of a Young Man by John Singer Sargent)Konstantin Levin (Robert Louis Stevenson and His Wife by John Singer SargentKitty Sch [...]

    6. People are going to have to remember that this is the part of the review that is entirely of my own opinion and what I thought of the book, because what follows isn't entirely positive, but I hope it doesn't throw you off the book entirely and you still give it a chance. Now my thoughts:I picked up this book upon the advice of Oprah (and her book club) and my friend Kit. They owe me hardcore now. As does Mr. Tolstoy. This book was an extremely long read, not because of it's size and length neces [...]

    7. Not since I read The Brothers Karamazov have I felt as directly involved in characters' worlds and minds. Fascinating.I was hooked on Anna Karenina from the opening section when I realized that Tolstoy was brilliantly portraying characters' thoughts and motivations in all of their contradictory, complex truth. However, Tolstoy's skill is not just in characterization--though he is the master of that art. His prose invokes such passion. There were parts of the book that took my breath because I re [...]

    8. A few months ago I read Anna in the Tropics, a Pulitzer winning drama by Nilo Cruz. Set in 1920s Florida, a lector arrives at a cigar factory to read daily installments of Anna Karenina to the workers there. Although the play takes place in summer, the characters enjoyed their journey to Russia as they were captivated by the story. Even though it is approaching summer where I live as well, I decided to embark on my own journey through Leo Tolstoy's classic nineteenth century classic novel. Altho [...]

    9. ساجعلكم تتعاطفون مع أسوأ نموذج بشريبل ستبكون💧من أجلها ايضاهتف تولستوى لتولد رواية أشبه بالدولاب المزدحم المكدس بالاغراض . ما ان تفتحه فجأة حتى تقفز شخصيات كثيرة و غنية في وجهك بجانب الثلاثي الشهير انا و أليكسي و اليكسي يوجد اربع أبطال اخرين الفصول تبدا بالخيانة و لكنها خيا [...]

    10. Alright, I'm going to do my best not to put any spoilers out here, but it will be kind of tough with this book. I should probably start by saying that this book was possibly the best thing I have ever read.It was my first Tolstoy to read, and the defining thing that separated what he wrote from anything else that I've read is his characters. His characters are unbelievably complex. The edition of this book that I read was over 900 pages, so he has some time to do it. His characters aren't static [...]

    11. "Leo Tolstoy would meet hatred expressed in violence by love expressed in self-suffering."—Mahatma GandhiThrough reading this praiseworthy classic, I have been forced to recalibrate my previously unreliable view of this celebrated author.You see, I was force-fed Tolstoy at college (his writing, not his flesh, silly! Mine wasn't a college for cannibals!) and at the time only carried War and Peace under one arm so I might appear cleverer than I actually was.So, how amazed was I that Anna K has s [...]

    12. This is a book that I was actually dreading reading for quite some time. It was on a list of books that I'd been working my way through and, after seeing the size of it and the fact that 'War And Peace' was voted #1 book to avoid reading, I was reluctant to ever get started. But am I glad that I did.This is a surprisingly fast-moving, interesting and easy to read novel. The last of which I'd of never believed could be true before reading it, but you find yourself instantly engrossed in this kind [...]

    13. So, I have this ongoing etiquette problem. Though sometimes I think it is a matter of respect. Or maybe social awkwardness. I’d consult my Emily Post on the issue, but it’s a unique bookworm sort of problem. I don’t think Ms. Post got that deeply into the protocol of neurotic bibliophiles. Anyway, the question is why do I unconsciously call an author by their first name sometimes? In some respects, I’ve had this conversation before in the context of gender. That is, are discussants more [...]

    14. [Turn the volume up;open me in new tab]There is a well-known belief that, brimming with the romanticism of bygone days to which reason acquiesces in silence, attempts to explain the elusive nature of human relations. According to this myth, the gods get involved in our existence by using a red cord. In Japanese culture, such cord is tied around the little finger; in China, around the ankle. Be it as it may, that string binds one person to the other; people who were always destined to meet, regar [...]

    15. Summer of 1985. My very manly brother, who rarely read classics, holding and reading a very thick book entitled Anna Karenina. “What is that thick book? Why is he interested on that?” I thought to myself. On the wall by his bed, was a big close up photograph of Sophie Marceau. Around that time, most teenage males in the Philippines were fans of this ever-smiling young lady and her poster was in their bedrooms. Our house was not an exemption. This was before my brother joined the US Navy. A d [...]

    16. What turned out to be the most interesting to me as I devoured this lush book was Tolstoy's amazing ability to show how we change our minds, or how our minds just do change -- how enamored we become of a person, a place, a whole population, an idea, an ideal -- and then how that great love, which seemed so utterly meaningful and complete, sours or evaporates just days, hours, or even minutes later -- in short, how truly fickle we are. And at the same time, each of the characters was in some way [...]

    17. 840. Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoyآنا کارنینا - لئو ن. تولستوی (نیلوفر) ادبیات روسیه؛ انتشاراتیها: ساحل، نیلوفر، کلبه سفید، سمیر، گوتنبرگ؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: بیست و چهارم ماه فوریه سال 1985 میلادیCharacters:Princess Ekaterina "Kitty" Aleksandrovna Shcherbatskaya, Anna Arkadyevna Karenina, Count Aleksei Kirillovich Vronsky, Konstantin "Kostya" Dmitrievitch Levin, Prince Ste [...]

    18. Read the end of Anna Karenina and listen to this song: youtube/watch?v=4mUmdRIt’ll break your heart.When I first completed this book, I sat down at my computer and attempted to review it, and all I could come up with was, “F*ck you, Tolstoy!!” I know that sounds juvenile, but I still have that feeling. I’m so ANGRY with him for what he did to Anna. I’m so angry that we were barely given a chance to know her. (Yes, I'm aware that she's a fictional character who never actually existed. S [...]

    19. “Anna Karenina,” my friend told me, “is one of the few books that have influenced how I live my life from day to day.”This statement touches on a question I often wonder about: Can reading great fiction make you a better person? I don’t mean to ask whether it can improve your mental agility or your knowledge of the world, for it undoubtedly does. But can these books make you kinder, wiser, more moral, more content? The answer to this question is far from self-evident. And maybe we shou [...]

    20. GREAT, in the highest sense of the word.Characters as deep and alive as the ocean, themes as diverse and as innumerable as grains of sand, a writing as powerful as a thunderstorm, as beautiful as a serene dawn, and as incomprehensible at times and yet all the more fascinating as this mysterious and neverending universe itself, and we have, in my opinion, the greatest work on life, freedom, faith, fate, love, suffering, and the human HEART - Anna Karenina!

    21. Passing Through the Human Passions"Let him first cast a stone at her"I read this Tolstoy masterpiece for the first time five years ago, coming to it with a cynicism formed by my mistaken impression that it was simply about Anna Karenina's terminal adulterous affair and her despicable selfishness toward her son. I thought the novel would, no doubt, effectively demonstrate the tragic consequences of self-centeredness and the absence of a moral compass. Beyond that, I was a cynic.My skepticism was [...]

    22. Levin (which is what the title should be, since he is the main character, the real hero and the focus of the book!) (But who would read the book with that title, I know!)If you don't want to know the ending, don't read this review, though I won't actually talk about what happens to Anna specifically, something I knew 40 years ago without even reading the book. I didn't read the book to find out what happens to her. I knew that. Probably many of you know or knew the ending before reading the book [...]

    23. If you look for perfection, you'll never be content.At long last I can put another notch in my literary belt. It has been a long time coming. For whatever reason the thought of reading Tolstoy has always intimidated me. Perhaps I was worried that I would not, well in truth, not so much like it really as understand it. Phftttt that was never really an issue and surprise, surprise I enjoyed this story even if I did find parts of it excruciatingly tedious.At its core Anna Karenina is a love story. [...]

    24. Amor, Felicidade, PaixãoA Felicidade é um estado de Amor permanente.Ama-se o sol, o mar, o céu, as nuvens, respirar, caminhar, as flores, o canto dos pássarosAma-se, Ama-se, Ama-se! Simplesmente Ama-se! Contudo, não é por geração espontânea que esse estado de amor iluminado acontece.É sim, um processo gradual.E é aí que o Amor pelo Outro entra em palco!Quando se ama desmedidamente alguém, esse amor transborda - extravasa tocando tudo à nossa volta. Transita por osmose para o Todo q [...]

    25. Look it seems to be the favorite novel among so many great novelists - Nabokov, Faulkner, Kundra, Joyce even Dostoevsky but I happen to be more in agreement with Rebecca West when she says, "And plainly Anna kareinna was written simply to convince Tolstoy that there was nothing in this expensive and troublesome business of adultery"If you read novels to be at somewhere else (and don't mind that place to be boring) this will work for you. It is a perfect chronicle of its times. The trouble is I h [...]

    26. From the Introduction:'I am writing a novel,' Tolstoy informed his friend the critic Nikolai Strakhov on 11 May 1873, referring to the book that was to become Anna Karenina. 'I've been at it for more than a month now and the main lines are traced out. This novel is truly a novel, the first in my life'Earlier this year, I came across a quote so attractive, that I thought whatever book it was from was automatically good. In other words, I had to read it."I've always loved you, and when you love so [...]

    27. Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina:"Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way."Tolstoy draws us into the tragedy by looking down in disdain at boring, happy families (the Brady family always comes to my mind) and sells his book by deciding that unhappy families provide more variety and thus entertainment, however tragic. From the start, we know that things will end badly, so later when we are introduced to Anna and Vronsky, we are more fascinated by the details on how [...]

    28. At the end of Gogol's Dead Souls a Troika gallops off leaving the author to ask with a flourish where it is speeding off to. Gogol on his death bed was struck by a severe case of religion and had the rest of the novel put on the fire (some pages were rescued), but symbolically, as a question about Russia and which direction the country should be travelling towards the image hangs over the literature and politics of nineteenth century Russia, above all perhaps in Tolstoy's Anna Karenina.The Ideol [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *