Accounting for Murder

Accounting for Murder Was something fishy going on at the National Calculating Company Was it mere inefficiency or fraud Irate stockholders have hired an outside accountant to investigate why all divisions save one are l

  • Title: Accounting for Murder
  • Author: Emma Lathen
  • ISBN: 9781572830004
  • Page: 290
  • Format: Paperback
  • Was something fishy going on at the National Calculating Company Was it mere inefficiency or fraud Irate stockholders have hired an outside accountant to investigate why all divisions, save one, are losing money Unfortunately, the accountant is soon found dead, strangled with the cord of his own adding machine Enter John Putnam Thatcher, the elegant silver haired banWas something fishy going on at the National Calculating Company Was it mere inefficiency or fraud Irate stockholders have hired an outside accountant to investigate why all divisions, save one, are losing money Unfortunately, the accountant is soon found dead, strangled with the cord of his own adding machine Enter John Putnam Thatcher, the elegant silver haired banker detective who charmed so many readers in Banking on Death Thatcher would like to keep out of the whole affair, but his customary curiosity soon has him investigating just who would be accounting for murder.

    One thought on “Accounting for Murder”

    1. The wonderful thing about the early Lathen's is that they feature Thatcher a great deal. And in this story his sharp tongued mind is on full display. A great mystery, that involves accounting! It may seem that accounting is dull to many people but, having some exposure to it, it actually is interesting and this mystery certainly gets down to the power of numbers and how they are read!

    2. This is actually a 1964 book. An early entry in the John Putnam Thatcher series. It is clear that the authors were just developing their style. The humor is not bad but not as well-done as in later offerings. The plot resolution is a bit hard to follow and depends upon a greater understanding of the characters than the authors have provided.

    3. Another good business mystery. And I guessed the murderer! One of the things I like best about this series is the chapter headings. They are always centered around a theme. In this case, since the victim is named Fortinbras, the theme is Shakespeare's Hamlet. Some examples - 2. Enter Fortinbras8. Weepings and Lamentations11. Distant Revelry15. Behind the Arras20. Exeunt OmnesAlso, in this book we learn that Thatcher is 60 years old. I don't think he ever ages, even though the books were written [...]

    4. This is a quite standard mystery centered around a simple but unusual accounting fraud. This book was first published in 1964 and takes place at that time. The business of business was definitely still a man's world then. I found it interesting to follow the descriptions of Mrs. Cobb as she interacted with the male managers. She is described as "nominally the assistant division manager in Research and Development, actually the guiding intelligence in a division notable for the rapid turnover of [...]

    5. I like Emma Lathen's writing and I like her banker, John Putnam Thatcher, but I have to admit that part of this book was a little too complicated to follow. But the general idea shines through and for all the TCP/IS something or other, this is a surprisingly entrancing mystery to follow.

    6. This 1964 Wall Street murder mystery was often fun to read, but the story never generated any real suspense or grabbed my interest. It's a series of cleverly-observed character studies and situations that never really cohere into an engaging mystery story. The authors (a duo working under the Emma Lathen pseudonym) take an ironic posture toward their story and its characters, but they devote more effort to witty observations and clever dialogue than to crafting a compelling narrative. One proble [...]

    7. Being myself an accountant, it was a nice experience to find notions of accounting and finance mixed with one of my favourite genres, as mystery is.On an absolute partial and subjective point of view, I liked it very much because of the background. As complexity, I can say it was a good read. Nevertheless it is the first book I read from this author, so I hope to find out in the future if his idea kept along further production or stood original within this book.

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