Passages to Freedom: The Underground Railroad in History and Memory

Passages to Freedom The Underground Railroad in History and Memory Few things have defined America as much as slavery In the wake of emancipation the story of the Underground Railroad has become a seemingly irresistible part of American historical consciousness This

  • Title: Passages to Freedom: The Underground Railroad in History and Memory
  • Author: David W. Blight
  • ISBN: 9780060851187
  • Page: 190
  • Format: Paperback
  • Few things have defined America as much as slavery In the wake of emancipation the story of the Underground Railroad has become a seemingly irresistible part of American historical consciousness This stirring drama is one Americans have needed to tell and retell and pass on to their children But just how much of the Underground Railroad is real, how much legend and mythFew things have defined America as much as slavery In the wake of emancipation the story of the Underground Railroad has become a seemingly irresistible part of American historical consciousness This stirring drama is one Americans have needed to tell and retell and pass on to their children But just how much of the Underground Railroad is real, how much legend and mythology, how much invention Passages to Freedom sets out to answer this question and place it within the context of slavery, emancipation, and its aftermath.Published on the occasion of the opening of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, Passages to Freedom brings home the reality of slavery s destructiveness This distinguished yet accessible volume offers a galvanizing look at how the brave journey out of slavery both haunts and inspires us today.

    One thought on “Passages to Freedom: The Underground Railroad in History and Memory”

    1. When I failed to be excited about Colson Whitehead’s fictional treatment of slavery in The Underground Railroad, I realized it was time to brush up on my understanding of the period. Whitehead moved real facts about American black history around until I was unsure what the actual timeline looked like. Kathryn Schultz’s review of Whitehead’s novel in The New Yorker suggested a few sourcebooks including this one, and makes the point that there is much myth that both races tell themselves abo [...]

    2. useful and readable essays by a variety of authors that include place, person, event, and much discussion of mythology and reality. Impressive range of illustrations. I especially appreciate the nation wide coverage, so for example you can learn about the terminus of the internal slave trade, Natchez, Mississippi - and those who took "leg bail" from there.

    3. Very useful and interesting. The history of the abolition movement and its effect on antebellum society in the North and the South isn't told often enough. I'm glad I had the chance to broaden my knowledge base.

    4. I read this book as research for a book I was writing on the Civil War. I learned quite a bit about the Underground Railroad that I didn't know. It had fascinating information in it.

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