The Chukchi Bible

The Chukchi Bible The Chukchi Bible is a collection of the myths and tales of Yuri Rytkheu s own shaman father The stories compose both a moving history of the Chukchi people who inhabit the shores of the Bering Sea a

  • Title: The Chukchi Bible
  • Author: Yuri Rytkheu Ilona Yazhbin Chavasse
  • ISBN: 9780981987316
  • Page: 140
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Chukchi Bible is a collection of the myths and tales of Yuri Rytkheu s own shaman father The stories compose both a moving history of the Chukchi people who inhabit the shores of the Bering Sea, and a beautiful cautionary tale, rife with conflict, human drama, and humor We meet fantastic characters Nau, the mother of the human race Rau, her half whale husband andThe Chukchi Bible is a collection of the myths and tales of Yuri Rytkheu s own shaman father The stories compose both a moving history of the Chukchi people who inhabit the shores of the Bering Sea, and a beautiful cautionary tale, rife with conflict, human drama, and humor We meet fantastic characters Nau, the mother of the human race Rau, her half whale husband and finally, the dark spirit Armagirgin, who attempts to destroy nature s harmony by pitting the two against each other The Chukchi Bible moves through Arctic tundra, sea, and sky and beyond introducing readers to an extraordinary mythology and a resilient people, in hauntingly poetic prose.Yuri Rytkheu was born in 1930 in the Chukotka Peninsula of the northeastern tip of Siberia, home of the Chukchi, a disappearing people inhabiting one of the most majestic and inhospitable environments on earth.

    One thought on “The Chukchi Bible”

    1. This was desolate at the end… except for the fact that the author has written this book. Native cultures of Siberia were declared worthless in the 20thC, and the main character sees his children schooled to be Bolshevik – and not Chukchi. Then I found out that Rytkheu - the main’s grandchild – toed this line for much of his life, and comes late here to celebrate Chukchi culture. Quote from A History of the Peoples of Siberia: Russia's North Asian Colony 1581-1990: Rytkheu even came to re [...]

    2. This is a wonderful, collection of myths, folk tales and short stories that build from the creation of the Chukchi in the harsh Arctic tundra, how the generations evolved from seafaring people to deer herders, to traders with the "hairmouths" from Russia.The writing is poetic and the stories fascinating. We are treated to descriptions of the icy tundra in the Chukotka Peninsula and the various rituals of the shamans. We see a society evolve from a simple fishing and whaling clan who occasionally [...]

    3. In Russian humor, an expanse of jokes and anecdotes as wide and varied as country itself, there exists a little corner of it known as the Chukchi joke, which features the Chukchi people of the Chukotka Peninsula (where Roman Abramovich can see Alaska from his mansion). Some of the punchlines come from the incontrovertible fact that Chukotka is cold ("Chukcha, why did you buy a refrigerator that goes to -4 degrees when it's -40 degrees out?" "Exactly!" said the Chukcha as he stepped into the refr [...]

    4. Fantastic. The author was born in a fishing village on the farthest coast of Siberia, and the book is a history of his people. Part One contains their creation stories and legends -- from the raven's droppings that formed the world to the man who brought deer-herding to the region to the village's first encounters with Russians ("hairmouths"). Part Two covers more recent history, mainly following the story of the author's grandfather as he becomes a shaman and goes on journeys, first within Sibe [...]

    5. This account of the myths and legends of the Chukchi people (a native Arctic tribe) is written by a contemporary Chukchi author, which sets it apart from a more anthropological narrative in some vital ways. Yuri Rytkheu is telling the history of his own family, and he claims the right to tell it in his own way--which in this case means with a rather modern narrative voice. Though the stories themselves may have been handed down through an oral tradition, this book was *written*: there's none of [...]

    6. I am impressed by this book’s audacity. Is this book the history of the world told from the perspective of a corner of the world rarely mentioned in histories? Yes.Is this book a calmly structured expression of the dual nature of cultural change and cultural continuity? Yes.Is this book a biography of the author’s grandfather, a man who stood at the latterday edge of Chukchi civilization and stared into the abyss of its decline, and who seemed to be present at an audacious (audacious if it [...]

    7. Yuri Rytheu's epic account of the struggles of the Chukchi people and their shaman/warriors uncovers depths of suffering, beauty, horror and splendor. It is a uniquely unsparing and lyrical account of human survival.

    8. Excellent book about the people who live on the northeastern tip of Siberia. The book is fiction but based on stories that have been passed down orally as well as the life of the author's grandfather who was a shaman.

    9. I made a interview with Yuri Rytkheu in Leningrad in the end of the 1980ies. He was a respected mmber of the Soviet writers union and lived in a grand apartement near the Tsar Winter Palace. With this background this book gets an extra dimension. In those days never said anything negative about the Soviet powers, but in this book his opinions has changed. I really recomend this book that I like very mutch.

    10. Despite the slightly clumsy title (the original Russian title is "the Last Shaman"), the author's last book is a wonderful epic story of the people of Chukotka, from the days the universe was created, until the last shaman of Uelen. Rytkheu combines historical facts, legends and good storytelling. One of the books you don't want to end.

    11. Excellent book about a culture I know nothing about -- the Chukchi people in the northern regions of the world, near the Bering Strait. The language in the book itself is beautiful and it's nice to read about another culture from their point of view.

    12. If I could walk for a week with a storyteller, I'd walk with him. Original, basic, earthy stories, human as the word should implement.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *