Justinian: The Sleepless One

Justinian The Sleepless One Nephew of a semi literate peasant Justinian I was one of the most fascinating of the Roman emperors His reign marked a blossoming of Byzantine culture and his prolific building works yielded such ma

  • Title: Justinian: The Sleepless One
  • Author: Ross Laidlaw
  • ISBN: 9781846971587
  • Page: 317
  • Format: Paperback
  • Nephew of a semi literate peasant, Justinian I was one of the most fascinating of the Roman emperors His reign marked a blossoming of Byzantine culture, and his prolific building works yielded such masterpieces as the church of Hagia Sophia, which remains the third largest church in Christendom Although he never took part in military campaigns personally he managed to exNephew of a semi literate peasant, Justinian I was one of the most fascinating of the Roman emperors His reign marked a blossoming of Byzantine culture, and his prolific building works yielded such masterpieces as the church of Hagia Sophia, which remains the third largest church in Christendom Although he never took part in military campaigns personally he managed to expand considerably the Eastern Roman Empire s territory Justinian s wife Theodora, daughter of a bear keeper and former prostitute, was his partner in one of the greatest love stories in history After her early death in her forties Justinian was devastated and sought oblivion in work, becoming known as the Emperor who never sleeps.

    One thought on “Justinian: The Sleepless One”

    1. Justinian: The Sleepless One is a mixed bag: an uneven narrative and spotty character development, blessed with fine research of the period. As a work of fiction, this title was a failure partially redeemed by the richness of historical detail contained within. No romantic depictions of "leaves rustling in the wind" will be found here; rather, this title reads more like a non-fictional treatise on the tribulations of Justinian and the empire in his charge, complete with footnotes and references. [...]

    2. On one hand this book offers a solid account of the Justinianic period, taking in all the major people, places and events of the time. On the other it is also crippled by stilted writing, shallow characters and some pretty glaring anachronisms (Narses starts talking about the merits of Blitzkrieg, while a Chinese sage is described as speaking Mandarin, to name a few).The story arc starts off promising, takes a gigantic dip, then seems to rise again but ends anticlimactically. The last two chapte [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *