A Question of Evidence: The Casebook of Great Forensic Controversies, from Napoleon to O.J.

A Question of Evidence The Casebook of Great Forensic Controversies from Napoleon to O J Scientific sleuthing and slip ups in the investigations of fifteen famous cases Ranging from the Turin Shroud and the suspicious death of Napoleon Bonaparte to the murder cases of Dr Sam The Fugitive

  • Title: A Question of Evidence: The Casebook of Great Forensic Controversies, from Napoleon to O.J.
  • Author: Colin Evans
  • ISBN: 9780471440147
  • Page: 159
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Scientific sleuthing and slip ups in the investigations of fifteen famous cases Ranging from the Turin Shroud and the suspicious death of Napoleon Bonaparte to the murder cases of Dr Sam The Fugitive Sheppard and O J Simpson, A Question of Evidence takes readers inside some of the most vexing forensic controversies of all time In each case, Colin Evans lays out the cScientific sleuthing and slip ups in the investigations of fifteen famous cases Ranging from the Turin Shroud and the suspicious death of Napoleon Bonaparte to the murder cases of Dr Sam The Fugitive Sheppard and O J Simpson, A Question of Evidence takes readers inside some of the most vexing forensic controversies of all time In each case, Colin Evans lays out the conflicting medical and scientific evidence and shows how it was used or mishandled in reaching a verdict Among the other cases the assassination of JFK, the strange history of Alfred Packer the only convicted American cannibal , the death of Vatican banker Roberto Calvi, and the trials of Lindy Chamberlain the dingo baby case and Dr Jeffrey MacDonald the case recounted in Fatal Vision Though the science of forensics has helped solve a huge number of crimes, it s clear from A Question of Evidence that many cases are open than shut Colin Evans Pembroke, UK is the author of the popular Casebook of Forensic Detection Wiley 0 471 28369 X as well as Great Feuds in History Wiley 0 471 38038 5.

    One thought on “A Question of Evidence: The Casebook of Great Forensic Controversies, from Napoleon to O.J.”

    1. Evans, Colin. A Question of Evidence: The Casebook of Great Forensic Controversies, from Napoleon to O.J. (2003) *****Or better yet, questions of interpretationI had intended to read only two or three of these cases, those that I was most familiar with, the O. J. Simpson case and the Jeffrey MacDonald case, for example, but found myself reading more and more into the book until I had read all fifteen of them.What Evans does so very well is concisely and clearly present the facts of the cases so [...]

    2. Covering fifteen of the most controversial cases, A Question of Evidence presents a nice range of forensic science blunders and outright mysteries. Without re-using much of his previous material, (only three cases have been mentioned in less detail in other books), Evans gives the reader a sampling of both historical (Turin Shroud, Napoleon Bonaparte) and modern (O.J. Simpson) cases that document the limits of forensic science and the influence defense attorneys possess when introducing doubt. E [...]

    3. Intriguing review of forensic controversies, wherein one learns that forensic "science" consists in equal parts of science, art, persuasion, fraud, and bribery, with people's lives at stake.Highlights: a review of "The dingo ate your baby!" (referenced in a hilarious Sienfeld episode), in which it turns out the dingo really did, and of course a thumbnail of the OJ case. Evans points out that cases of the OJ type are rare because it takes massive amounts of money to buy private forensic investiga [...]

    4. Just finished reading this, and as a crime scene investigator, it makes me feel a lot better about the mistakes I have made in my career, and thankful that the ones I have made have not been compounded by my co-workers, or exploited by a vengeful lawyer.Interesting reading in any case.

    5. The stories are short and I tore through them on my daily commute. Written sort of in a serial thriller/mystery style, they don't go into any deep detail but I still found them fairly interesting, especially some of the earlier crimes with which I was less familiar.

    6. I hadn't heard of a lot of the cases in the book, so I liked being introduced to those, and I also liked the recap of ones I was familiar with, like the Lindy Chamberlain story (dingoes ate her baby) and O.J. of course.

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