Resurrection and Redemption: A Study in Paul's Soteriology

Resurrection and Redemption A Study in Paul s Soteriology A study of the structure of Paul s theology of Jesus resurrection as that doctrine forms the center of Paul s total theology

  • Title: Resurrection and Redemption: A Study in Paul's Soteriology
  • Author: Richard B. Gaffin Jr.
  • ISBN: 9780875522715
  • Page: 227
  • Format: Paperback
  • A study of the structure of Paul s theology of Jesus resurrection as that doctrine forms the center of Paul s total theology.

    One thought on “Resurrection and Redemption: A Study in Paul's Soteriology”

    1. What is central to Paul's soteriology? Is it individual redemption? Is it regeneration? Is the ordo salutis a good way to view salvation? Or is there a better way? Gaffin argues persuasively that the resurrection of Christ is the central event in the history of redemption and is the controlling factor in Paul's individual and corporate soteriology. He does detailed exegetical study of key NT passages on the resurrection. The exegetical studies are marvelous. From these studies Gaffin shows that [...]

    2. Gleanings from Gaffin’s The Centrality of the Resurrection: A Study in Paul’s Soteriology. I maintain, that for all Gaffin's brilliance--and I agree with him in large part--he proves there is no such thing as one unified Reformed soteriology. My references are from the earlier edition.“Baptism signifies union with Christ” (45).Thesis: believers are united to Christ in his death; Christ’s death took on our sin; therefore, believers have died to sin (45). Interestingly, he leaves out his [...]

    3. If you cannot get through Vos' "Pauline Eschatology" then read this book. Dr. Gaffin does a great job of, in a lot of ways, getting the kernels of wisdom from Vos into an understandable and very important work. Highly recommend.

    4. Richard Gaffin’s book ‘Resurrection & Redemption’ is a cracker! The tone of the work is potent, bold and convincing. I would say there is no doubt in his mind that the truths contained are just that. True. He combines reformed biblical methodology with solid exegesis and he uncovers Paul’s doctrine of the resurrection and salvation. The discoveries within this work are what seems to be a helpful corrective on some long assumed reformed emphasis. Gaffin exercises respect for the histo [...]

    5. First interaction with Gaffin. Quite intriguing. I wish he had provided more historical witness for his exegesis. I’m sure there’s been someone at some point to argue in this fashion.

    6. Brilliant. Absolutely brilliant. Not sure I agree with everything (and I definitely don't understand everything) but this is well worth reading.

    7. This book really served to move my faith from abstract to concrete, as far as understanding what it actually means to be redeemed in Christ. It takes some real careful, prayerful effort to understand some things, but it is worth it. Here are some of the best things I can think of about this book:1. It is exegetical. Gaffin is showing us what Paul had to say about salvation. Exegesis par excellence. So it helps our faith rest less in the wisdom of men and more in the holy word of God.2. It is tri [...]

    8. This is a difficult book, but worth ploughing through. Gaffin's main thesis is that many Reformed treatments of soteriology have not given sufficient attention to Paul's emphasis on the resurrection of Christ. Christ is the one who has accomplished redemption in his death and resurrection. His accomplishments include justification, adoption, sanctification, and glorification. These are applied to all who are "in Christ" - united to him by faith.Here's one key conclusion: "Not justification by fa [...]

    9. This was an interesting read, mixed with good points, usually followed by what I thought were over-reaching conclusions. For example, what I apprehended to be the thesis, that "Strictly speaking, not Christ's death, but his resurrection (that is, his exaltation) marks the completion of the once-for-all accomplishment of redemption," is an extremely helpful and well argued point. However, Gaffin uses this point to cast aspersions on, or I should say at the very least distrust in, the doctrines of [...]

    10. This is an excellent book about the centrality of the resurrection of Christ. It is extremely academic and very difficult to read. Gaffin’s basic thesis is to discuss Paul’s theology and to show that his, for Paul, soteriology is eschatology. Gaffin has an excellent approach to the ordo salutis and shows that all of the distinct marks of the ordo salutis (justification, adoption, sanctification…) are viewed by Paul not as distinct acts but as distinct aspects of a single act. And, the resu [...]

    11. What can I say about Dick Gaffin that I haven't already said in other reviews? A peerless exegete and theologian, he is. In this work (published as a dissertation in 1969 but as fresh today as ever), he points to the resurrection of Christ as the center of Pauline theology. To condense to the extreme, believers are not so much adopted, justified, sanctified, and glorified as Christ is adopted, justified, sanctified, and glorified via his resurrection, and those benefits flow to us through union [...]

    12. A short but powerful work aimed at recovering the Apostolic emphasis on the preaching of Jesus resurrected. While he has much to say about the way we understand the ordo salutus that is intriguing, the real benefit of this work is the emphasis that the Apostolic preaching placed on Jesus as both Christ and Lord. This was central in the preaching and theology of both Peter and Paul. I love Sinclair Ferguson's statement in his forward that Jesus was a Benefactor of the Gospel by virtue of his resu [...]

    13. Top FiveThis is a strange book to be in anyone's top five. But it's in mine, and unapologetically so. Historically, the Reformed tradition has connected our redemption fundamentally to the work of Jesus Christ on the cross, often at the expense of the redemptive relevance of the resurrection. In this book, Gaffin sets out to rectify this shortcoming and explore the connections between the resurrection of Christ and the redemption of God's people.It's a thick book, and not for the faint of heart. [...]

    14. A great book on the centrality of not only the resurrection of Christ and how it pertains to our faith but our overall union with Christ made complete at the resurrection. Highly recommend it to anyone that is looking for in depth study on the resurrection via exegesis of many of the key Pauline resurrection texts. Difficult especially the first 80% of the book but the remaining 20% is very rewarding.

    15. For starters, it's an extremely difficult read, because the author decided to go hunting for the biggest words he could find in the dictionary. Secondly, the author blatantly states that John Calvin, Charles Hodge, and B.B. Warfield are wrong in their understanding of Paul. Finally, he proclaims that the classic Reformed understanding of the order of salvation outlined in Romans 8:29 is wrong as well. I don't know whether to be offended or cry at the author's seeming self-conceit and hubris.

    16. Dr. Gaffin explores how Paul's understanding of the resurrection shapes his theology. He explains that the resurrection of Jesus was the inauguration of the age to come (kingdom fo God). Believer are now partakers of the age to come (being risen with Christ) while at the same time waiting for his return and our bodily resurrection for the final consummation of the Kingdom of God.

    17. The doctrine of the resurrection is easily and sadly overlooked. This necessary resource sheds light on how indispensable the resurrection is in our understanding of redemption and our newness of life in Christ. It is a bit laborious at times and not written in the most reader friendly style.

    18. Richard Gaffin is one of my theological heroes. In my opinion, this is his best work. It helped me to understand the radical importance of the resurrection for Christianity, for Jesus himself, and for believers.

    19. Gaffin is one of the best on Reformed theology, standing firmly in the Dutch tradition, and this book is a great defense of the centrality of the Resurrection in Paul's thought. His refinement of the Ordo is also much needed.

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