Concerning E. M. Forster

Concerning E M Forster Frank Kermode s assesses the influence and meaning of all of Forster s novels as well as his criticism reflects on his profound musicality Britten thought Foster the most musical of all writers and o

  • Title: Concerning E. M. Forster
  • Author: Frank Kermode
  • ISBN: 9780297851165
  • Page: 284
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Frank Kermode s assesses the influence and meaning of all of Forster s novels as well as his criticism, reflects on his profound musicality Britten thought Foster the most musical of all writers and offers a fascinating interpretation of his greatest work, A Passage to India.

    One thought on “Concerning E. M. Forster”

    1. Frank Kermode's brief study of E. M. Forster is in 2 parts. The first and more formal is taken from a series of lectures. The second is what the publisher calls a conversation on several aspects of Forster's life and work. As the word suggests, its tone is more casual, though just as sincere and learned. Kermode leaves no doubt that he considers A Passage to India to be Forster's most enduring work. His interpretation, perhaps not new but new to me, is a combination of the secular and divine, a [...]

    2. Forster has always been a very special writer to me; his treatment of women in his novels was quite different from his contemporaries. As a teenager, I identified with many of his flawed but fascinating female characters - intellectually curious, slightly muddled, creative, sympathetic. While Kermode rightly notes that while his principal novels can seem outdated/Edwardian, Forster's writing about the ways in which race, class and gender are navigated by members of different classes is quite ahe [...]

    3. By no means a systematic or thorough examination of all things Forster, this book feels more like a conversational guide through certain aspects of Forster's life and work. When I read A Room With a View and Howard's End, the musical nature of them drew me in, so I found Kermode's discussion of Forster's musicality, specifically his use of rhythm and faking, to particularly shine. He also examined Krishna in A Passage to India in a brilliant reading I don't think I would have ever matched on my [...]

    4. The subject here is a great deal larger than E.M. Forster, though it includes discussion of all his work. Even more it delineates the particular niche of English literary society he occupied, and for which was at pains to define the requirements for membership. It's not always a pretty story, but consistently informative and, for me, a new way to look at Forster and his circle. Frank Kermode's class approach, while verging on cruelty at some points in the story, is the only way to speak about th [...]

    5. Best for Frank Kermode's unfailing voice, his impatience with Forster's high class snobbery and the anecdotes about Forster's dislike of Henry James:The differences between the two novelists may be expressed succinctly by comparing James and Forster on Tolstoy. To Forster War and Peace was the greatest of all novels; to James it was something of a disaster: 'what do such large loose baggy monsters, with their queer elements of the accidental and the arbitrary, artistically mean? His example for [...]

    6. Excellent, concise analysis of Forster's use of music and Eastern influences on his work, as well as as a lengthy look at the the events of his life and how they shaped his writing.

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