Cross-Cultural Adoption: How to Answer Questions from Family, Friends and Community

Cross Cultural Adoption How to Answer Questions from Family Friends and Community Coughlin and Abramowitz offer useful insight for answering questions inevitably asked of adoptive families Cross Cultural Adoption is an invaluable tool for parents adopting internationally Claudia Ja

  • Title: Cross-Cultural Adoption: How to Answer Questions from Family, Friends and Community
  • Author: Amy Coughlin Caryn Abramowitz Rocky Bleier
  • ISBN: 9780895260925
  • Page: 204
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Coughlin and Abramowitz offer useful insight for answering questions inevitably asked of adoptive families Cross Cultural Adoption is an invaluable tool for parents adopting internationally Claudia Jacqueline Semar, M.Ed director of family services, Commonwealth Adoptions International, Inc.

    One thought on “Cross-Cultural Adoption: How to Answer Questions from Family, Friends and Community”

    1. I started reading this because one of my family members is in the adoption process. However, beyond giving some helpful ways to word answers that your children might ask, it's really too basic. I get that the authors wanted to write a book to hand to busy family members but it left me with more questions than answers. Also, some of the suggested responses to children's questions are intentionally phrased so positively that they become sugary and downright untruthful. Example: parents are directe [...]

    2. Simple, short, effective. Gonna keep this on my shelf for referencing. Sometimes the language/tone of these child rearing books irritates me, but I find that it's often worth sticking with it. Part of the tone of course comes from the fact that we're talking about young children and their language is different than ours and the way we speak to them is different than the way we speak with adults. Obvious, yes, but still an adjustment for me.

    3. This is a very quick read with some good information. It really is geared to extended families of adopted children. It has some good answers for common questions about adoption, but mostly focuses on adoption from other countries, not really interracial adoption, which brings its own set of questions and inappropriate comments. On the whole, good information, though.

    4. It was interesting, but most of it was basic adoption information, and very little, in my opinion dealt with the specific problems pertaining to cross cultural adoptions. Also the end of the book did not pertain to us at all because the country we are adopting from was not one of the ones listed.

    5. Kind of a weird book selection, but I was curious. I read this in one evening and actually thought it was interesting and made me more aware of how to talk about adoption with my family if it ever comes up.

    6. This book seemed most geared toward children and how to answer their questions about having an adopted sibling/cousin, etc.

    7. A good resource for anyone adopting or considering adoption. Especially useful to share with an older sibling to read in preparation. We are sharing it with our 10 year old daughter.

    8. Parts of this are a little simplistic, but it's a good overview of the things people say/ask about cross-cultural adoption, and it has good ideas about how to handle those remarks.

    9. A simple and straightforward book that is a great resource to share with extended family and friends of adoptive families.

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