A Geography of Oysters: The Connoisseur's Guide to Oyster Eating in North America

A Geography of Oysters The Connoisseur s Guide to Oyster Eating in North America Passionate and playful this is the first comprehensive guide to identifying serving and savoring one of America s original and most delicious foods Considered one of the great sensual foods since t

  • Title: A Geography of Oysters: The Connoisseur's Guide to Oyster Eating in North America
  • Author: Rowan Jacobsen
  • ISBN: 9781596913257
  • Page: 393
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Passionate and playful, this is the first comprehensive guide to identifying, serving, and savoring one of America s original and most delicious foods Considered one of the great sensual foods since the time of ancient Rome, eaten in the United States since its earliest human habitation, oysters are now seeing an American renaissance Like wine and cheese, they owe muchPassionate and playful, this is the first comprehensive guide to identifying, serving, and savoring one of America s original and most delicious foods Considered one of the great sensual foods since the time of ancient Rome, eaten in the United States since its earliest human habitation, oysters are now seeing an American renaissance Like wine and cheese, they owe much of their flavor to terroir, or the specific environment in which they grow indeed, oysters are the food that tastes most like the sea Today, there are at least two hundred unique oyster appellations in North America, each producing oysters with a distinct and consistent flavor some merely passable, others dazzling Beautifully written and illustrated, A Geography of Oysters is an indispensable guide to the oysters of America, describing each oyster s appearance, flavor, origin, and availability Readers will learn how to shuck, how to pair wines and oysters, and how to navigate a raw bar with skill and panache The book includes recipes, maps, black and white photos, and a color guide, as well as lists of top oyster restaurants, producers, and festivals Painting a picture of the quirky characters who farm oysters and the gorgeous stretches of coast where these delicacies are found, A Geography of Oysters is both terrific reading and the guide that foodies of all types have been waiting for.

    One thought on “A Geography of Oysters: The Connoisseur's Guide to Oyster Eating in North America”

    1. A Geography of Oysters is a beautiful book about one of my favorite foods. I first heard of it when it won a James Beard award in the food reference category.Jacobsen goes into the history of the oyster, as well as providing a guide and comments on the 132 most frequently encountered varieties. There's also a Q & A as well as a few recipes in the back.An interesting point that he brought up is that everyone remembers their first oyster. Mine was at a party on a Cape Cod beach when I was thir [...]

    2. This is an amazing resource if you are a fan of oysters. My first date with my wife was at the "Oyster Bar" in Grand Central Station here in NYC. Back then we just ordered a bunch of things that were less than $3. Years have passed we began to eat A LOT and learn which ones we liked and little by little we developed knowledge of what we thought was good. It was fun and really, really expensive. If we had bought this book back then we could have saved thousands of dollars not to mention the lives [...]

    3. The single greatest book on bivalves I have ever had the pleasure to read. Funny, informative, moving. This book will warm your heart and strengthen your adductor muscle.

    4. “Sometimes all you want from the world is sweetness and light; at such times, the [Kumamoto] is your oyster.” Yes!!! This is exactly how I feel about my favourite oyster, and to an extent oysters in general, which is what prompted me to buy and read this book. Where I had expected a dry but informative survey of North American oyster varieties that would serve me well in my travels, I found myself instead fully engaged in this incredibly readable and entertaining book by an author who derive [...]

    5. Geography is really the wrong word for the title of the book. Although it does touch on the geography of oysters, it is really more of a history on oyster consumption, a travel guide for ostreophiles (oyster lovers), a graduate seminar on how to eat oysters and a polemic, arguing for why you should love oysters. Jacobsen makes a convincing case for oysters, and this reader, having only had oysters a few times, is intrigued by the idea of exploring his inner oyster lover. This book serves as a go [...]

    6. I received the book for Christmas. I have come to love oysters over the last three to five years, but knew little to nothing about them. Rowan Jacobsen writes with knowledge and passion about the subject (including detail geologic and geographic information about terroir). I can’t wait to order from some of the distributors he suggests as restaurant prices and limited grocery store selection has certain restrained my consumption.

    7. Loved this book, and have dogtagged it, for reference in my journeys.If you have even the slightest hint of interest in oysters or acquaculture, I wouldn't hesitate to find a used copy or check it out from a library.

    8. Punks can be foodies too, you know? No I'm kidding. Of course they can't. Especially oysters which are a hot commodity and pretty pricy in New England. A Geography of Oysters reads more like an encyclopedia than a casual book about what it's like to eat oysters in the US, and that's because Rowan Jacobson gets right down to business. He lays it all out meticulously by region and what you should know if you really want to be get serious about oysters. And Jacobson is serious about this oyster bus [...]

    9. Did you know oysters are mobile and have some visual acuity early in their lives, but then voluntarily give up locomotion and sight? Or that they are sequential hermaphrodites that can change sex from year to year? Are you familiar with the nuances of "merroir"? (Think "terroir" for sea-dwellers.) This is the so-called Oyster Bible, and it will tell you everything you want (or didn't want) to know about the bivalve. I picked it up only because my boss handed it to me, but it was actually highly [...]

    10. I loved the first part, the history and biology of the oyster. The parts about each and every oyster location & species, though, weren't for me. The recipes weren't up my alley, either. This is geared for the connoisseur who wants to try all of these oyster varieties, traveling or shipping them in to evaluate each one. I just want to go to a NC coast roast, bring my knife, and eat a half-bushel of lightly steamed Stump Sounds. Mmmm <3

    11. Lots of information. I enjoyed the description of the oysters but I had to put it down more than I would have liked because the descriptions were all running together in my mind. I will probably use this as a reference guide before I go and buy my first batch of raw oysters to shuck and enjoy at home.

    12. Highly recommended! In particular, I was delighted to come across the section, "What kind of oyster eater are you?" Interesting recommendations on the kinds of oysters that suit different taste preferences. I also enjoyed the recommendations of martini, beer, sake, and water pairings with oysters, after the very thorough wine-oyster pairing section.

    13. This turned out to be a great reference book for oysters. I had no idea there were so many different kinds! Tells you how they grow, different farming methods, historical development, what types are from where and what their flavors are, what sort of oysters you are most likely to like based on a categorization of palates, and then safety and other questions answered at the end.

    14. Looking for an approachable, informative, comprehensive, witty and affectionate book about the world oysters? You couldn't do better than this one. Rowan Jacobsen writes so wonderfully about food. His other books are amazing too.

    15. I love food books by people who actually know how to write more than food reviews. This is a great book for anyone interested in understanding where oysters come from, how they grow, and how to pick the best tasting.

    16. Good book if used as a reference. Not really a straight through and read book, although it tries to set itself up that way. Useful information written irreverently at times (which I enjoyed.) Would be a good buy for future use as you explore oysters.

    17. What an amazing read for the oyster and non-oyster enthusiast. OK, possible more of interest to the oyster lovers. Oysters of all countries and origins are represented, just a fascinating book.

    18. A great guide who anyone who likes eating oyster. Tons of cool facts, history and different kinds of oyster's. A foodie book with humor and knowledge.

    19. This is one of the only comprehensive guides to oysters. It's also incredibly helpful in better understanding this delicious and reputationally "risky" delicacies.

    20. Great book for oyster amateurs and pros alike. Very easy read. Check out the website for helpful oyster cheat/reference sheets.

    21. This is a must-have, must-read for anyone who is an oyster aficicionado. It will, however, make you hungry for oysters, so plan accordingly and do NOT read it at midnight on a Saturday

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