Folklore and the Fantastic in Nineteenth-Century British Fiction

Folklore and the Fantastic in Nineteenth Century British Fiction Arguing that the tensions between folk metaphysics and Enlightenment values produce the literary fantastic Jason Marc Harris demonstrates that a negotiation with folklore was central to the canon of

  • Title: Folklore and the Fantastic in Nineteenth-Century British Fiction
  • Author: Jason Marc Harris
  • ISBN: 9780754657668
  • Page: 243
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Arguing that the tensions between folk metaphysics and Enlightenment values produce the literary fantastic, Jason Marc Harris demonstrates that a negotiation with folklore was central to the canon of British literature He uncovers the ideological agendas articulated using folkloric elements in works by James Barrie, William Carleton, James Hogg, Sheridan Le Fanu, George MArguing that the tensions between folk metaphysics and Enlightenment values produce the literary fantastic, Jason Marc Harris demonstrates that a negotiation with folklore was central to the canon of British literature He uncovers the ideological agendas articulated using folkloric elements in works by James Barrie, William Carleton, James Hogg, Sheridan Le Fanu, George MacDonald and Robert Louis Stevenson, among others, and reveals the rhetorical strategies for applying superstition in both folkloric and literary contexts of the supernatural The literary fantastic is a topic which has soared in both the contemporary imagination and in critical review Dealing with the canonical and non canonical works of luminaries that includes Barrie, Dickens, Eliot, MacDonald, and Stevenson Jason Marc Harris s ambitious book examines the tensions between folk metaphysics and Enlightenment values that produce the literary fantastic Demonstrating that a negotiation with folklore was central to the canon of British literature, the author charts the complicated rhetoric associated with folkloric fiction, suggesting the authors in question used folklore to articulate profound cultural ambivalence towards issues of class, domesticity, education, gender, imperialism, nationalism, race, politics, religion and metaphysics Both provocative and insightful, Harris s analysis of the function of folk metaphysics in nineteenth and early twentieth century narratives with prove stimulating reading for those interested in nineteenth century British fiction.

    One thought on “Folklore and the Fantastic in Nineteenth-Century British Fiction”

    1. Harris makes a lot of good points, but I've never heard of half the authors that he uses for his examples, which made it a little hard to figure out.

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