A Chair for Always

A Chair for Always There are some things that Rosa just knows She knows that she can t wait to meet her new baby cousin due to be born at any minute right upstairs She knows that she will grow up and move away and mayb

  • Title: A Chair for Always
  • Author: Vera B. Williams
  • ISBN: 9780061722790
  • Page: 161
  • Format: Hardcover
  • There are some things that Rosa just knows She knows that she can t wait to meet her new baby cousin, due to be born at any minute right upstairs She knows that she will grow up and move away and maybe go to college, and perhaps even become the president of the United States And she knows that the chair that wonderful, beautiful, beloved chair, the chair for her mother There are some things that Rosa just knows She knows that she can t wait to meet her new baby cousin, due to be born at any minute right upstairs She knows that she will grow up and move away and maybe go to college, and perhaps even become the president of the United States And she knows that the chair that wonderful, beautiful, beloved chair, the chair for her mother will always be there.Always Just the way it is Covered in velvet with roses all over it, ready for who knows what new adventure .

    One thought on “A Chair for Always”

    1. This is a continuation of a Chair for Mother. This book continues with the adoribal little girl from the first one and continues with it's warm colored water colors. In the first book. It focused on her getting the chair, and in this one she is sharing and showing off her to her family and friends. This is a great cultural book, the same as the first one. This book would be included in my selection of diversity books. Even though it uses the same style of water color illustrations, it uses a dif [...]

    2. Another in the series about Rosa and her family that began with the luminous _A Chair for My Mother_. (Winner of the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award and a Caldecott Honor Book in 1983.) This is an adequate sequel, but really tells two stories: the first is about the birth of Aunt Ida's new baby, Rosa's little cousin. The second, and more poignant, is about the chair. When Grandma reupholsters it she is resigned, but when Mama suggests they may need to replace it someday, Rosa is indignant, remindin [...]

    3. A Chair for My Mother, the hugely successful prequel to this book, is one of my favorites and I look forward to it every year as part of the 2nd grade tutoring curriculum at the school. Obviously I snapped up this sequel as soon the library put it into circulation. Although the characters are the same, the story and illustrations aren't as good. Where A Chair for My Mother draws children in with the pictures and story, this one seems to ramble around and not have a tight enough focus.

    4. This fourth (and final) book about Rosa and her family, begins with Grandma and Rosa together in the chair. Aunt Ida is pregnant and baby Benji is coming soon. Rosa imagines sitting in the chair with the baby and dreams about the baby's future. Rosa loves the chair but it is getting worn and her Grandma and mother want a new chair. But Rosa wants it to stay there forever and the same. It was another really sweet story about Rosa and her family. I can kind of relate to Rosa and her chair - I'm ki [...]

    5. The classic A Chair for My Mother is followed by this story, which tells the story of Rosa's cousin's birth and an attempt to reupholster the famous chair. The obvious theme juts into a jagged story. It really feels like Williams has two stories to tell but wasn't quite sure how to squeeze them into one book. Proponents of home births and midwifery will appreciate this low-key story about a baby being born at home.

    6. This was just OK. Nothing near to the Reading Rainbow quality of "A Chair for My Mother." It was nice to return to the characters, and the illustration style. It just didn't click with me. Except for the part about being attached to a chair that has memories. Having to (last year) throw away my favorite chair that was part of our family for ~20 years, I know how it is to want to take that chair where ever you are, no matter how impractical.

    7. Little Rosa is so excited about the upcoming birth of her new little cousin. The cousin will be delivered right upstairs at her Aunts, and she can't wait to play with the new baby. She is also fond of a very lucky chair that was her mothers. Now the chair belongs to Rosa, but she shares it with her friends and new cousin.

    8. This is a nice enough story that is a continuation of "A Chair for My mother". "A chair for my mother" is one of my perennial favorites and this one is nice, but to me, it didn't have as big of an emotional hook as Chair for my mother. This one has the same cast of characters but a baby gets born and the chair is getting old. Rosa would like things to stay the same. So it was ok.

    9. We picked this up because my daughter wanted a book about birthing babiesoh boy! So I saw this book, which is a nice continuation of A Chair For My Mother, and it features an aunt who has a home birth (appropriate for young audiences). The chair is back and filled with more people and history then ever.

    10. The borders for each two-page spread are by themselves worth checking out this book. The very colorful illustrations in a somewhat childlike style are the strength of the book, while the storyline is a bit stretched (birth of a nephew, attachment to a beloved chair), including elements that didn't necessarily converge cleanly.

    11. Admittedly I have not read A Chair for My Mother, yet. I also did not realize that this book was a sequel. That being said, I felt that it stood on its own as a gentle story about family love and kindness. The home birth experience is well written, and the chair symbolizes the unstated family bond that is felt across generations of Rosa's family.

    12. This story is a take off from a chair for my mother. Same story line except it centers on the aunt and new baby in the family.Could not find guided reading level for this text. It was published in 2009. As I read it not sure if it is a good text for guided reading groups.

    13. Beautiful watercolor illustrations, but a disappointing, messy "plot" that doesn't really seem to get to the point until the next-to-last page. Williams' A Chair for My Mother was more direct and well done.

    14. K-3. Great follow up to A Chair For My Mother. Used book to work on comparing and contrasting and also to talk about sequels. The students enjoy seeing the similarities in the illustrations and are great at catching specific details.

    15. This is a cute continuation of the first book. Now we add a cousin but the chair is still the main theme will go with Rosa forever. It is okay. The pictures are good, and the story is interesting but not a rave for me!

    16. This book written as a sequel to A Chair for my Mother (which we really liked). This one is definitely not as good. The story wanders, BUT I do really like that it talks about a home birth with a midwife. That is something you never find in a children's book.

    17. I love "A Chair For My Mother" and all of her other picture books. I like this because it is all about family and friends and even includes the idea of a home birth!

    18. A Chair for My Mother is one of my favorite picture books to recommend. This follow-up is a nice story having to do with a new baby, memory and change. It's very well done.

    19. A special chair helps Rosa as changes come to her family. Williams gives readers a strong extended family and friends that welcomes not only a new baby, but also continues to have a place for Rosa.

    20. Sequel to A Chair for My Mama - fun memories. First book probably better, but good. Read through CCPL Mock CaldecottThemes: baby, family, music, midwife, chair, saving, tradition, memories

    21. a wonderful tale about remembrance and the way most children, even adults want things to stay the same and be passed on to the next generation.

    22. This book could be used to teach the differences of economic status within the classroom. Despite these differences, all students deserve respect.

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