The Making Of An Economist, Redux

The Making Of An Economist Redux Economists seem to be everywhere in the media these days But what exactly do today s economists do What and how are they taught Updating David Colander and Arjo Klamer s classic The Making of an Econo

  • Title: The Making Of An Economist, Redux
  • Author: David Colander
  • ISBN: 9780691125855
  • Page: 380
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Economists seem to be everywhere in the media these days But what exactly do today s economists do What and how are they taught Updating David Colander and Arjo Klamer s classic The Making of an Economist, this book shows what is happening in elite U.S economics Ph.D programs By examining these programs, Colander gives a view of cutting edge economics and a glimpsEconomists seem to be everywhere in the media these days But what exactly do today s economists do What and how are they taught Updating David Colander and Arjo Klamer s classic The Making of an Economist, this book shows what is happening in elite U.S economics Ph.D programs By examining these programs, Colander gives a view of cutting edge economics and a glimpse at its likely future And by comparing economics education today to the findings of the original book, the new book shows how much and in what ways the field has changed over the past two decades The original book led to a reexamination of graduate education by the profession, and has been essential reading for prospective graduate students Like its predecessor, The Making of an Economist, Redux is likely to provoke discussion within economics and beyond.The book includes new interviews with students at Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, MIT, Chicago, and Columbia In these conversations, the students the next generation of elite economists colorfully and frankly describe what they think of their field and what graduate economics education is really like The book concludes with reflections by Colander, Klamer, and Robert Solow.This inside look at the making of economists will interest anyone who wants to better understand the economics profession An indispensible tool for anyone thinking about graduate education in economics, this edition is complete with colorful interviews and predictions about the future of cutting edge economics.

    One thought on “The Making Of An Economist, Redux”

    1. This is a follow-up to Colander and Klamer's first book of the (almost) same name. I read them back-to-back, which I think was a good idea.Again, this was just a hugely useful read for anyone considering graduate school in economics. As a follow-up, it was also interesting because of its decision to re-survey economists from the original study to see whether or not their views had changed. It also was able to compare the survey results of graduate students in the 1980s to those in the early 2000 [...]

    2. I began this book with a lot more optimism about the economics profession and my own role in it than I had by the end. Some background on me, I'm a rising junior who studies economics at Swarthmore College. That's a liberal arts school for those of you who are wondering: what's that? The past year of college has been an exercise in answering: "What do you want to do after college?", and for me, the idea of being a professor didn't seem too bad. Economics is interesting. Teaching is fun. Thus, ec [...]

    3. I read this book shortly after having read the original Making of an Economist (1990) by Klamer and Colander, which I liked a lot. In fact, it was precisely because I liked the original book so much that I read this one shortly after. I was excited and curious as to what had changed. The original book was written more than 25 years ago so when I read it I approached it from a somewhat sociological and historical perspective. I could relate to many of the feelings the students referred to, but I [...]

    4. This book provided me with a lot of insight into what graduate school in economics is like. Though much of it is above my head because of my limited background in economics, it still answered a lot of questions I had and gave me a sense that graduate studies in economics may not be the path I seek. Though economics has much to offer, and may well be the most technical and math-oriented of the social sciences, I'm concerned about how theoretical PhD programs are nowadays. PhD programs are geared [...]

    5. This was a second read. The first time I read this book was either when I was in undergrad or shortly after I graduated, and at that time it put me off of applying to PhD programs. Having decided to apply, I figured I should read it again. It didn't put me off this time. I think on the previous read-through, I didn't feel like I could say I was sure I wanted to go to a doctoral program, which many of the interviewees in this book say is an important thing to be sure of (for good reason). I also [...]

    6. As a prospective graduate Economics student, I found the Making of an Economist, redux to be a good teaser into what I could expect from Economics graduate schools in the US, and would recommend it to anyone considering the same path. I read it a while ago, but what I found particularly interesting about the book was the current state of the Economics profession, and how it's progressed since the original 1990 book. They sample phd interviewee's from the top schools, which allows the reader to g [...]

    7. Part of my dissatisfaction with this book may stem from the fact that the one I got from the library is the one published around 1989 and not the "Redux". I read several websites that recommended it as helpful to anyone considereing graduate study in economics. There was some information that was useful about this, and the culture and environment of economics Ph. D. students and the economics departments of major universities. I personally just didn't get what I was looking for out of it.

    8. Colander’s survey of top graduate econ programs is mandatory for anyone considering an econ PhD, and holds interest for those who want insight into the evolution of economics in the 20 years since Colander’s original book. Colander’s conversational interviews with grad students are particularly fascinating, as they wrestle honestly with their thoughts on what economics can-and cannot-accomplish.

    9. A thought provoking survey of economics graduate students around 2004. A good read for those considering graduate school or thinking about how graduate curriculum in economics should be structured.

    10. Note: I didn't add the same book twice. They wrote "The Making of an Economist" in 1990, then did another book in 2004 with the same methodology. They're both enlightening.

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