Pacific Dream: A 2,657-Mile Through-Hike Up the Pacific Crest Trail

Pacific Dream A Mile Through Hike Up the Pacific Crest Trail A PACIFIC CREST TRAIL THROUGH HIKE THIS VIVID ACCOUNT OF A MAN AND HIS WIFE HIKING FROM MEXICO TO CANADA AT ONE GO IS AMAZING Unflinchingly honest vividly told funny true fascinating exciting Pac

  • Title: Pacific Dream: A 2,657-Mile Through-Hike Up the Pacific Crest Trail
  • Author: John Illig
  • ISBN: 9781932762372
  • Page: 459
  • Format: Paperback
  • A PACIFIC CREST TRAIL THROUGH HIKE THIS VIVID ACCOUNT OF A MAN AND HIS WIFE HIKING FROM MEXICO TO CANADA AT ONE GO IS AMAZING Unflinchingly honest, vividly told, funny, true, fascinating, exciting Pacific Dream is all these things It s the best book I ve read this year and I ll never forget it John writes with a candor that s shockingly fresh and real His prose is cA PACIFIC CREST TRAIL THROUGH HIKE THIS VIVID ACCOUNT OF A MAN AND HIS WIFE HIKING FROM MEXICO TO CANADA AT ONE GO IS AMAZING Unflinchingly honest, vividly told, funny, true, fascinating, exciting Pacific Dream is all these things It s the best book I ve read this year and I ll never forget it John writes with a candor that s shockingly fresh and real His prose is clear as the water in one of the rushing streams he fords It s as if I walked the trail with him, and I loved every step and this, coming from a non hiker, is high praise D.W.St.John, Author Editor

    One thought on “Pacific Dream: A 2,657-Mile Through-Hike Up the Pacific Crest Trail”

    1. John Illig’s Pacific Dream is not a journey simply from point A to point B. It is much more than that. We get the chance to venture across physical and emotional terrain. For those thinking this is a how-to book, you are sadly mistaken. John does something that many are incapable of doing. He captures his surroundings while venturing into the human psyche, revealing a level of honesty and vulnerability seldom seen. He dislodges the myth of the alpha athlete simply pushing the physical envelope [...]

    2. I really enjoyed this book about the PCT. Inside Illig's life is more drama that the typical PCT/AT/Camino hiking books I've read. Illig's Pacific Dream reads much more like memoir and a good memoir at that. His ability to describe scenery took me on location. I froze when he froze. I felt despondent when he described his feelings. I don't want to spoil the book for anyone so I won't get into details on feelings expressed.Toward the end of the book the editing (at least of the ebook) is poor. In [...]

    3. This book was OK. It was less about actual experiences on the trail and more about getting from one trial town to another. Too many numbers- by that I mean he is always telling you how many miles he hiked, at what elevation he tented, etc. Those numbers don't mean much to me. I want to know how it feels to EXPERIENCE the PCT- not how many miles to the next hotel. Yes, the author was very honest in his writing but I couldn't relate to or understand a lot of what was going on inside his head. I ha [...]

    4. I devoured this book because I've been itching to do a through-hike for a long time and consequently read any through-hike journal/book/blog I can get my hands on. I like this book because it describes the entire PCT (Mexico to Canada) and also discusses some of the more interesting/challenging aspects of it. However, it is very repetitive (several passages were obviously cut-and-re-pasted, along with an incessant recitation of mileage) and rather too much detail is paid to the time spent in tra [...]

    5. Struggling with mental health issues and an ill suited marriage the author needs to hike. More a journey of self discovery than a 'what's it like on the PCT' guidebook, and that's what makes this book interesting.You can certainly understand why the author was diagnosed as bipolar after his hike.I liked this book. A lot.

    6. I love to hike, and enjoy first hand accounts of epic hikes far more than fictional travel stories, as you really can't make it up. I may not be able to tackle this challenge myself, but I can live vicariously!

    7. Better than I thought it would be. Ends up being more biographical, as books of this type often do (for them to have mass appeal, I'm guessing they must, even though I would enjoy a biography-less version). I liked it enough to probably check out his other two books - about the AT and the CDT.

    8. Illig is a natural memoirist who can open up his heart and mind and let the reader in to share his life. It's a skill few writers have, to write as they speak. Great adventure story, too.

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