Night Cry

Night Cry When a local boy is kidnapped a young farm girl must overcome her fears in order to solve the mystery Ellen finds the courage to search through the dark alone for the missing boy after hearing the

  • Title: Night Cry
  • Author: Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
  • ISBN: 9780440900214
  • Page: 426
  • Format: Paperback
  • When a local boy is kidnapped, a young farm girl must overcome her fears in order to solve the mystery Ellen finds the courage to search through the dark, alone, for the missing boy after hearing the sound of a human cry in the woods Winner of the Edgar Allan Poe Award for Best Juvenile Mystery of the Year.

    One thought on “Night Cry”

    1. A sort of teaching story and mystery combined. It's a good-enough mystery story, but written with a blunted pencil in too broad of strokes. Just because something is written for youth doesn't mean it has to hit you over the head with lessons you're teaching. There is one subtle pearl in here: The young heroine doesn't give credit to the horse for helping her conquer her fears; she acknowledges the credit for herself. Having read a zillion horse stories, I've seen a lot of the former, and little [...]

    2. KUCHA PECHA REPORT AUTHOR, EDGAR AWARD WINNER, SUSPENSEEllen's dad has just got a new job and will be leaving her home alone while he travels. Living in the backwoods, there are a lot of night sounds that Granny Bo calls night cries. When a local boy is kidnapped for ransom, Ellen has to decide who she can trust. Is it the guy who showed up looking for work, Granny Bo, Jimmy-Clyde, or even the horse Sleet who threw and killed her brother? This is a story of learning to trust, the power of gossip [...]

    3. Awakened once again by the terrible night cry her grandmother has said is a inhuman, Ellen begins to believe that the scream is that of a recently kidnaped boy. I think that this is a good book for anyone who likes fear or mystery type books. I personaly liked it. It was suspenceful and well written. I really like how they described the setting. I really could see the house in my head like I was watching a movie.

    4. Read this one when I was about 11, and, back then, it was the most suspenseful thing I'd ever read (at that age, it was probably one of the only suspenseful books I'd yet read). On a re-read over 20 years later, I found that suspense hasn't diminished. It's STILL the page-turner I remember it to be! I'm happy for that.

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