The Whims of Creation

The Whims of Creation The inhabitants of the artificial world called The Agamemnon are suddenly overrun with fairies unicorns dwarves and dragons As they search for answers a young misfit named Ulysses stumbles upon an

  • Title: The Whims of Creation
  • Author: Simon Hawke
  • ISBN: 9780446365185
  • Page: 133
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • The inhabitants of the artificial world called The Agamemnon are suddenly overrun with fairies, unicorns, dwarves and dragons As they search for answers, a young misfit named Ulysses stumbles upon an alternative reality within an interactive cybergame and the software is alive.

    One thought on “The Whims of Creation”

    1. The concepts in this book - between the AI, the ship itself, and the extrapolations of automation - are well ahead of their time. As we become more 1) reliant on machines 2) capable of developing sophisticated AI 3) lazy - intellectually and physically, I think that our society might have to face some issues like the ones addressed here. We may not. Those things might happen slowly enough that we adapt well to them, or we might just blow ourselves up. Even if our species never falls into a place [...]

    2. This was the best fantasy book I read in high school. Of course I'd need to re-read it now, as it's been ~15 years since the last time I read it (which was the sixth time, I think) and there have been many new books since then. But Simon Hawke's "Wizard of Fourth Street" (also Fantasy/Sci Fi) is *THE* book that got me interested in reading in 7th grade. Yes, I had hit the Roald Dahl really hard in 4th through 6th grades, but then I found Wo4St in Ms Bowie's reading class and I was never the same [...]

    3. For a reason I can't quite pin down, I found myself totally, utterly absorbed into this book. The meld of concepts - generational spaceship with strange, mystical apparitions worthy of a fantasy novel - was a pull. Most of Hawke's stuff I quite take to, but this just hit a spot for me and I found it a pleasant little gem.

    4. Well--interesting concept. I think it shows a decent grasp of human nature and how it would respond to cultural conditioning to suppress its natural instincts and functions. Or, at least, theories thereof. The writing, however, is somewhat immature, distracting from the story.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *