Bone Game: A Novel

Bone Game A Novel Bone Game is a murder mystery on a grand scale Cole McCurtain a mixed blood Indian professor of Indian Studies at Santa Cruz California is haunted by dreams dating back to events of Spanish Califor

  • Title: Bone Game: A Novel
  • Author: Louis Owens
  • ISBN: 9780806128412
  • Page: 395
  • Format: Paperback
  • Bone Game is a murder mystery on a grand scale Cole McCurtain, a mixed blood Indian professor of Indian Studies at Santa Cruz, California, is haunted by dreams dating back to events of Spanish California Images of a Spanish priest murdered in 1812, a rearing grizzly bear, and a black and white painted Indian who offers bones in his extended hands come at a time when dismBone Game is a murder mystery on a grand scale Cole McCurtain, a mixed blood Indian professor of Indian Studies at Santa Cruz, California, is haunted by dreams dating back to events of Spanish California Images of a Spanish priest murdered in 1812, a rearing grizzly bear, and a black and white painted Indian who offers bones in his extended hands come at a time when dismembered pieces of a young woman are washing ashore in 1993 The dreams become increasingly urgent as the murders become frequent, and Cole s family and friends gather to help including Choctaw relatives who travel west from Mississippi because this story s so big, Cole sees only a little bit of it.

    One thought on “Bone Game: A Novel”

    1. This is a really fun read, with a fast-paced and intriguing murder mystery storyline, interesting characters, and lots of humor. The central character, Cole McCurtain, a mixed blood professor of literature in California, is an engaging protagonist; his daughter, Abby, is a likable and believable young woman; his friend Alex, a fellow professor and a Navajo Indian who likes to wear dresses is funny without becoming the butt of jokes by the book or the author. The best thing about this novel is it [...]

    2. Review: Bone Game by Louis Owens. 3.5★'s 05/09/2017This is the sequel to The Sharpest Sight . The book is well-written, and I could feel Owens insights to real life events that gave the story some realism, The characters were interesting and the story was understandable once I got use to his writing style. The story is woven back and forth from present murders to early Spanish Colonial events. Owens writing style of prose and symbolism imagery was slow at the start but as I read on I had no pr [...]

    3. 3.5Beautifully written novel! This is the third time I've written this review so I'm going to have to keep it short. If you are hoping this is going to be a page-turning crime novel then I must burst your bubble a little, but it is a beautiful character study and exploration of Native American and mixed-blood themes. The murder mystery aspect certainly takes a back seat but it does remain necessary to the progression of the plot and the overall point of the story; though, I will say it's kind of [...]

    4. It is books like this that make you fear when you will find another one as good. The Sharpest Sight is the other book by Louis Owens that I have read. This one is better. More full and whole, the prose is strong and the narrative is quick paced, Native American-noir, a term Owens should have capitalized on.Similar to all his fiction books, the main character, Cole McCurtain, is based on Owens himself. He was a half-breed Choctaw/Irish. A professor of English/Creative Writing and Native American [...]

    5. Interesting mixture of thriller and "literary" novel. Dense and overwritten at times, as one might expect from a college-professor novelist. And the protagonist is a disillusioned middle-aged English professor who drinks too much and despises his students-- we always need more novels like that, right? Only this English prof is a Native American, beset with troubling spirit visions. Now that is interesting. By far the best aspects of the book are the various Native American characters and their a [...]

    6. Louis Owens’ Bone Game is a deeply psychological murder mystery surrounding Cole McCurtain, a mix blooded Indian, who is a professor of English and Indian Studies at UC Santa Cruz. Owens implements many aspects of traditional Native American storytelling, such as the trickster figure, and the myth of the Gambler. Ghost walk and think among people in Bone Game; Owens seamlessly transitions from modern mystery thriller to mystical folklore, tying all these aspects together to tell a story about [...]

    7. Cole McCurtain is a Native American studies professor at University of Santa Cruz. He's also half Native American. However, he's lost what that used to mean to him. All that's left is the jargon he spits out for his students semester after semester. However, when dismembered bodies start showing up on the beaches of Santa Cruz and Cole starts seeing a man known as the Gambler outside his window, Cole realizes that something has changed and he no longer has the connection to figure it out. Owens [...]

    8. Filled with dark humor and even darker history, Louis Owens makes you remember that practically ever part of the United States is haunted by atrocities of the past that seem to be forgotten. He employs an actual series of serial killing that occurred during the 1970s around UC Santa Cruz as the basis for this novel, which revolves around indigenous tribal spirits rising up from the past to wreak havoc on the present and with obviously good reason! In any case, now whenever I visit Santa Cruz, I [...]

    9. Bone game is about rituals in Native American tribes. The novel is incredibly intense and mysterious at all times. The line between real and fantasy becomes blurred and almost invisible at most points in the novel. The novel focuses on the ritual and story and almost has nothing to do with white think, so the read can be quite confusing. However, this book is well worth it for any writer looking for a different scope of imagination.

    10. Wowzers. So after finishing other Native American novels like Reservation Blues and Love Medicine, Bone Game takes a dark and trippy turn into the spiritual part of the culture. This book focuses more on how modern Native American culture reacts to the world around it, and themes of assimilation, identity crises, and haunting dreams all wrap up a nice package of interesting characters and (very literally) gory details and language.

    11. This was a very interesting book, especially because I lived in the Bay Area during the time period in which the novel is set. I love how Owens attacks Native American stereotypes by diving into them and creates a book that makes the reader question culture, academia, and involves a murder mystery all at the same time.

    12. I suspect many readers will find this story a bit of a jumble, but if they hang in there they will be rewarded. The characters are layered, and interesting.

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