Living with Our Genes: Why They Matter More Than You Think

Living with Our Genes Why They Matter More Than You Think A lucid thought provoking account of the case for nature as a determinant of personality Peter D Kramer Author of Listening to Prozac and Should You Leave Nowhere is the nature nuture controversy be

  • Title: Living with Our Genes: Why They Matter More Than You Think
  • Author: Dean H. Hamer Peter Copeland
  • ISBN: 9780385485845
  • Page: 244
  • Format: Paperback
  • A lucid, thought provoking account of the case for nature as a determinant of personality Peter D Kramer, Author of Listening to Prozac and Should You Leave Nowhere is the nature nuture controversy being arduously tested than in the labs of world renowned molecular scientist Dean Hamer, whose cutting edge research has indisputably linked specific genes to behav A lucid, thought provoking account of the case for nature as a determinant of personality Peter D Kramer, Author of Listening to Prozac and Should You Leave Nowhere is the nature nuture controversy being arduously tested than in the labs of world renowned molecular scientist Dean Hamer, whose cutting edge research has indisputably linked specific genes to behavioral traits, such as anxiety, thrill seeking, and homosexuality The culmination of that research os this provocative book, Living with Our Genes In it, Dr Hamer reveals that much of our behavior how much we eat and weigh, whether we drink or use drugs, how often we have sex is heavily influenced by genes His findings help explain why one brother becomes a Wall Street trader, while his sibling remains content as a librarian, or why some people like to bungee jump, while others prefer Scrabble Dr Hamer also sheds light on some of the most compelling and vexing aspects of personality, such as shyness, aggression, depression, and intelligence In the tradition of the bestselling book Listening to Prozac, Living with Our Genes is the first comprehensive investigation of the crucial link between our DNA and our behavior Compulsive reading, reminiscent of Jared Diamond, froma scientsit who knows his stuff and communicates it well Kirkus Reviews A pioneer in the field of molecular psychology, Hamer is exploring the role genes play in governing the very core of our individuality Accessibleovocative Time Absolutely terrific I couldn t put it down Professor Robert Plomin, Social, Genetic Developmental Psychiatry Research Center, Institute of Psychiatry

    One thought on “Living with Our Genes: Why They Matter More Than You Think”

    1. I have to read this book for a lower division general biology class that I am taking to fill up my schedule. I am actually about to graduate with a degree in biological anthropology so nothing in this book was much of a surprise to me. HOWEVER, I think everyone should read this book. I think science is so important and it seems that a lot of people don't care about it because they don't understand it. Living With Our Genes (although probably a bit dated by now on some topics), is a great introdu [...]

    2. An extremely disappointing book that places far more importance on nature (genes) than nurture (environment) and wildly suggests that the decoding of the genome is the greatest boon mankind will ever receive, capable of curing all human ills, extending life and bringing an end to suffering. There are many more balanced and interesting books on the topic of genetics since this was published.

    3. I read this as part of my AP Psychology class in high school. I found it very interesting and still think about what I read, even 10 years later. I may even reread it.

    4. I fully believed that this book was onto something, utilizing tests between twins and adopted children. But then I went and got psychotherapy. One opinion prescribed me psychoactive medication. Another suggested social integration tactics without the drugs. I asked the latter psychologist if anxious and depressed people have more sex. This book suggested yese stated nopulsive people have more sex. Compulsion seems to tie into anxiety, but it's sort of a side-effect for some and not for all. It p [...]

    5. An interesting read about various human "conditions" and the genes that may play a role in their occurrence. I wanted to like this book more but I found it a very uneven read. It covers the areas as Thrills, Worry, Anger, Addition, Sex, Thinking, Hunger, and Aging.At times it felt like reading an undergraduate thesis paper. Each section would start off with a little vignette about a "condition" then proceed into varies studies about genes that may be related/the cause of the condition. This auth [...]

    6. This book contained a great amount of new and intriguing information. I was able to skim through or pass some sections because I had already learned about them in my psychology course, so that was reassuring since the information could be validated. However, I felt that even though the book was focused on the genetic perspective, it still included environmental/social explanations, but I wish there could have been more. A few areas seemed a little one-sided, but I did appreciate that some topics [...]

    7. I had to read this for my BioPolitics class in conjunction with a law book (court cases, journal articles, etc.) and newspaper articles. It provides a really good, lay-person's explanation of the scientific perspective of how genetics influence behavior. Hamer works for the NIH as a biochemist and thus gives a very scientifically-sound description. A good read for anyone who wants to know to what extent their genes affect their anxiety, weight, personality, aging, and aggression.

    8. AWESOME BOOK!!!! An honest look at the nature vs. nurture debate. The author challenges stereotypes; from intelligence within races to obesity. I appreciate all the work the author put into this book. I can see that the author took the time to really study the nature vs. nurture debate using facts and not opinion. Which in our culture can be extremely convoluted.

    9. AWESOME BOOK!!!! An honest look at the nature vs. nurture debate. The author challenges stereotypes; from intelligence within races to obesity. I appreciate all the work the author put into this book. I can see that the author took the time to really study the nature vs. nurture debate using facts and not opinion. Which in our culture can be extremely convoluted.

    10. If you've always suspected that nature wins over nurture most often, then this is the book for you. It shows how genes affect our anxiety, weight, personality, aging, and aggression. I used to puzzle over how often relatives told me my looks and mannerisms matched those of my maternal mother, although I barely knew her. Now I know why.

    11. This book is chock full of examples to pit nature versus nurture. I still remember being convinced for a long while after reading this that we have very little control over our behaviors per our genetic predispositions. They take many cases of identical twins separated at birth and compare their outcomes later in life; you know, the obvious.

    12. Quite an interesting book about some of the research into the effect of genes on many parts of our personality and character: Thrills, worry, anger, addiction, sexuality, thinking, hunger, and aging. It was written in 1998, so I wish he would write another that tells us what further research has found.

    13. I feel like I got a broad sense of how genes play into nearly every aspect of human behavior, personality, health, etc. but there wasn't much concrete facts or info to remember as he often would imply something had a big effect then cite another study that discounted that effect.I also felt nervous reading a science book from 1998.

    14. i picked this up from the library when i was wanting to read the book about gays but it was checked out.I don't like it so much but i have only read about a chapter. Seems really dumbed/watered down. I'm worried it won't contain any science.I gave up on this one. returned to the library

    15. nf--found very interesting--objective telling.didn't realize it was pub. in 98---now want to read updated verson (but am going to read the Violinist's Thumbwhic h I believe will bring me up to date on this subject.)

    16. This book didn't really do it for me. I didn't enjoy the constant switching from story telling to in depth biology. If you can't find a way to properly intertwine the two, then pick one and stick with it.

    17. Like Judith Herman's book, this is meant for people who want to know what external circumstances shape the human soul.

    18. Although I usually only read fictional, I really enjoyed this book. The style was very comprehensive and the author used really interesting examples to make it totally relatable.

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