Wetlands: A Threatened Landscape

Wetlands A Threatened Landscape Wetlands occupy some six per cent of the Earth s land surface They vary from fens and freshwater marshes to tropical mangroves and tundra swamps They perform vital hydrological chemical and biologica

National Wetlands Inventory U.S Fish and Wildlife Service Wetlands Horicon National Wildlife Refuge Credit USFWS Wetlands provide a multitude of ecological, economic and social benefits They provide habitat for fish, wildlife and plants many of which have a commercial or recreational value recharge groundwater, reduce flooding, provide clean drinking water, offer food and fiber, and support cultural and recreational activities. Birds Korea Habitat Wetlands Korea s most threatened South Korea lacks endemic bird species, and is rather poor in terms of avian dry land diversity compared with other East Asian countries, but its wetlands and waterways are extremely important for the future conservation of migratory waterbird species, around of which are globally threatened, and for the future well being of the human population. Why are Wetlands Important Wetlands Protection and Wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, comparable to rain forests and coral reefs An immense variety of species of microbes, plants, insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds, fish, and mammals can be part of a wetland ecosystem. Fivebough and Tuckerbil Wetlands Fivebough Wetlands Fivebough Tuckerbil Wetlands, located near Leeton NSW are Ramsar listed Reserves, managed by NSW Department of Industry Lands Water, with collaborative agency involvement, for the preservation of high value natural ecosystems which support threatened and endangered water birds and waders as well as other bird life and native wildlife species. Wetland A wetland is a distinct ecosystem that is inundated by water, either permanently or seasonally, where oxygen free processes prevail The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other land forms or water bodies is the characteristic vegetation of aquatic plants, adapted to the unique hydric soil.Wetlands play a number of roles, sometimes referred to as functions. Classification and Types of Wetlands Wetlands Protection Used by U.S Fish and Wildlife Service One commonly used classification system for wetlands was developed by Cowardin and is described in Classification of Wetlands and Deepwater Habitats of the United States.The Cowardin system is used by the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service for the National Wetlands Inventory. Kinabatangan Wetlands Resort A charming resort tucked in the wilderness of Lower Kinabatangan surrounding the pristine freshwater swamps and mangrove forest An exclusive nature retreat, distance away from the crowded city and the busy tourists areas of Sabah Environmental Destruction World Centric Environmental Destruction The planet s natural ecosystems and regenerating bio capacity are being severely degraded and, as a result, this compromises the ability of the planet to sustain life. Wetlands in California and Oregon Could Disappear With Sea Northern pintail ducks flock to the wetlands of the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge during their migrations in southern Oregon in this handout photo from the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service Homepage Ramsar Wetlands world s most valuable ecosystem disappearing three times faster than forests, warns new report September Wetlands, the most economically valuable and among the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world, are disappearing three times faster than forests with severe consequences for our future unless urgent action is taken to ensure their survival, warns a new report by

  • Title: Wetlands: A Threatened Landscape
  • Author: MichaelWilliams
  • ISBN: 9780631166146
  • Page: 286
  • Format: Unknown Binding
  • Wetlands occupy some six per cent of the Earth s land surface They vary from fens and freshwater marshes to tropical mangroves and tundra swamps They perform vital hydrological, chemical and biological roles and contain unique and diverse forms of wildlife and habitat They are disappearing at an alarming rate and are threatened by both the direct and indirect effects ofWetlands occupy some six per cent of the Earth s land surface They vary from fens and freshwater marshes to tropical mangroves and tundra swamps They perform vital hydrological, chemical and biological roles and contain unique and diverse forms of wildlife and habitat They are disappearing at an alarming rate and are threatened by both the direct and indirect effects of human activity The purpose of this book of especially commissioned articles is threefold a to explore the occurrence and composition of wetlands and their physical and biological dynamics b to consider the impact upon them of agriculture, industry, urbanisation and recreation and c to examine what steps can be taken to manage and to preserve their future survival.

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