What the Night Sings

What the Night Sings After losing her family and everything she knew in the Nazi concentration camps Gerta is finally liberated only to find herself completely alone Without her Papa her music or even her true identit

  • Title: What the Night Sings
  • Author: Vesper Stamper
  • ISBN: 9780525526056
  • Page: 248
  • Format: Audio CD
  • After losing her family and everything she knew in the Nazi concentration camps, Gerta is finally liberated, only to find herself completely alone Without her Papa, her music, or even her true identity, she must move past the task of surviving and onto living her life In the displaced persons camp where she is staying, Gerta meets Lev, a fellow teen survivor who she justAfter losing her family and everything she knew in the Nazi concentration camps, Gerta is finally liberated, only to find herself completely alone Without her Papa, her music, or even her true identity, she must move past the task of surviving and onto living her life In the displaced persons camp where she is staying, Gerta meets Lev, a fellow teen survivor who she just might be falling for, despite her feelings for someone else With a newfound Jewish identity she never knew she had, and a return to the life of music she thought she lost forever, Gerta must choose how to build a new future.

    One thought on “What the Night Sings”

    1. Equally a love letter to the power of music as well as a Holocaust remembrance. Lyrical, evocative language is the real strength of this book, though the story itself is engaging, too, though horrific, because of what happened to the Jews, which it does not shy away from discussing. It's almost more poignant because the heartbreaking details are reported so matter-of-factory, while the hopes and dreams (if there are any left to have) are presented so magically, that that juxtaposition makes the [...]

    2. Read our full review on Hypable!What the Night Sings doesn’t feel like a rehash of the many other books of the genre. In fact, it feels so personal and accurately portrayed that it could almost be a true story.Historically, music had a presence in many concentration camps during the Holocaust. Used both as an act of humiliation by the guards to the prisoners when forcing them to sing and chant during punishments, and in a more meaningful yet also tragic way: an act for survival.I personally do [...]

    3. Am I your friend? Then trust me, you want to read this book. Don't read it or buy it for the wonderful weight of paper or the font or the smell of ink. They are all wonderfully apt choices. Read it for the journey your heart will make with Gerta. Read it for remembering a piece of history too oft relegated to statistics and numbers too mind-boggling to comprehend. Read it to trace your own humanity. This is not only good young adult fiction, it is good literature. The story is an immersive exper [...]

    4. Copy provided by the publisherGerta lives with her father, a viola player, and her step mother, who is a famous singer. For reasons she doesn't fully understand, she no longer goes to school, but is tutored at home. Eventually, her father stops going to work, and he and Gerta are sent to a concentration camp. The father manages to keep his viola, but it ends up in Gerta's care, which helps her to survive, since she plays in various prison orchestras. Her real love is singing, but the horrors of [...]

    5. WonderfulI read this book in the space of a day. I haven't cried so much in a long, long time. But unlike the other times I read fiction about the Shoah and think about all the lives snuffed out - including family I will never know I don't know, this time I wept with relief and hope as well. The pages sing with it, this hope.

    6. I really appreciated the fact that this book covered the recovery process of the character. I enjoyed that this was the main focus of the book- while there was some content that took place during the concentration camps and some that took place before the concentration camps, the vast majority of this book was focused on Gerta's recovery and re-discovery of her own identity. The few things that I didn't like about this book included the fact that in the section "Women's Music" (this book is divi [...]

    7. I really liked What the Night Sings. I really liked how it was set after the camp was freed with relevant flashbacks instead of about the time in the camp. The only thing that bothered me was how the Maria thing wasn't more developed.

    8. Interesting fiction book following a girl who survived a concentration camp, with flashbacks to how to she got there. She was raised by her father and an opera singer, when the truth of their secret Jewish heritage leaks and Gerta must figure out how to live after surviving.Simple illustrations. Appropriate for middle school in content, but I’m not sure all themes will land and be understood.

    9. What an extraordinarily beautiful and unique book about the Holocaust this one is! While many books about WWII cover the events leading up to the Holocaust as well as the tragedies of the concentration camps, few seem to give much attention to the aftermath, which this one does. Gerta Rauschn is sixteen when the story begins, and while others around her are dying of typhus, she is fortunate to be healthy enough to survive when the British arrive to liberate the inhabitants of Bergen-Belsen Conce [...]

    10. I really loved this book. The book is set at the end of World War II. The story begins shortly before the British liberation of the concentration camp where Gerta was. You learn about how Gerta, a teen, came to be at the camp - mostly through flashbacks. Though What the Night Sings deals with the holocaust, it really is more about being a survivor and figuring out who you were when what you thought defined you is stripped away from you. What made this book more unique to me was the fact that it [...]

    11. I really wanted this book to be more profound than it ended up being. I loved the illustrations and learning a little more about how Auschwitz worked, specifically in regards to the musical group. However, I wanted to go more in depth into the character's feelings and the butterfly metaphor.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *