Growing Up Again: Parenting Ourselves, Parenting Our Children

Growing Up Again Parenting Ourselves Parenting Our Children This guide helps adults help themselves and their children as it explains the differences between love and indulgence structure and criticism independence and abandonment Exercises and charts help o

  • Title: Growing Up Again: Parenting Ourselves, Parenting Our Children
  • Author: Jean Illsley Clarke Connie Dawson
  • ISBN: 9780894865664
  • Page: 474
  • Format: Paperback
  • This guide helps adults help themselves and their children as it explains the differences between love and indulgence, structure and criticism, independence and abandonment Exercises and charts help organize the information into an easy to use resource.

    One thought on “Growing Up Again: Parenting Ourselves, Parenting Our Children”

    1. My copy of this book is fairly tattered, I used it so much while processing my adult-child issues. It was invaluable in understanding the causes of problematic behavior being raised by two alcoholic parents had given me. Also, how to correct it all, going right back to the root of it. Yup. Thank you Ms Clarke & Ms Dawson for all your help.

    2. An easy read with good information.Great book for any person who has children in their life.Affirmations to development stages, the impact of different style of parenting on a child. You learn the internal message that sticks with them when you are critical or overindulgent.The chapter on discounting alks about how a person experiences and emotions and what it looks like when you discount that. Insight is important because you can then choose to create change in your own behaviors towards self a [...]

    3. I liked the beginning of this book. Some of it was a little obvious. I do like the developmental guides in the back of the book that list the job of the child at that stage and the job of the parent to foster the child's development and confidence. I plan to keep it on my bookshelf as a reference. Some examples of responses to teenagers were great!

    4. This book was recommended by a counselor. and it has been extremely insightful and edifying. I found it particularly helpful that the book did not only focus on how to provide nurture and structure for a child, but also for ourselves. So often, the unforgiving voice in one's own head can hamper all progress, fulfillment, or joy.

    5. Interesting metaphors about how we surround ourselves with a protective shield. The book stimulates ideas about how our capacity for resilience is shaped by our carers and early life experiences. It is empowering in that it provides practical advice on how individuals are capable of devising a robust coping strategy.

    6. All parents should read this book. Also everyone who didn't receive ideal parenting (that's all of us). It will help you to fill in the gaps in your own development so that you can become more fully yourself, and accept yourself and that your parents did the best that they could. It will also help you to understand how to balance your parenting with your own children, as well as yourself.

    7. There is a wonderful chart that categorizes styles of child-rearing, from abuse to respect to love to indulgence to neglect. The extremes of the spectrum, abuse and neglect, are similar in the degree of damage they do to the child.

    8. Wow. I have read hundreds of parenting books; it is hard to impress me. The depth of understanding about why we do the things we do, what the possible effects are, and how changing those actions is healing both to our children and ourselves.

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