Pitied But Not Entitled: Single Mothers and the History of Welfare, 1890-1935

Pitied But Not Entitled Single Mothers and the History of Welfare When Americans denounce welfare most are thinking of the program of aid for single mothers and their children the only program of the Social Security Act to become stigmatized Gordon uncovers the ta

  • Title: Pitied But Not Entitled: Single Mothers and the History of Welfare, 1890-1935
  • Author: Linda Gordon
  • ISBN: 9780029124857
  • Page: 479
  • Format: Hardcover
  • When Americans denounce welfare , most are thinking of the program of aid for single mothers and their children the only program of the Social Security Act to become stigmatized Gordon uncovers the tangled roots of competing visions of welfare and shows that welfare reform can only work if it recognizes that single motherhood is an enduring aspect of contemporary life.

    One thought on “Pitied But Not Entitled: Single Mothers and the History of Welfare, 1890-1935”

    1. In "What is 'Welfare'?," Gordon explains that welfare's meaning in today's society as an underserved handout is primarily liked to the AFDC program. AFDC is the successor to ADC which was part of the Social Security Act of 1935. But Social Security had 11 titles that established 9 different programs, but it is in the difference between Old Age Insurance and ADC that Gordon sees the historical roots of welfare's stigmatization:The Social Security Act created the contemporary meaning of "welfare" [...]

    2. Gordon's history of welfare is essential reading for those interested in both women's history and in the history of welfare.

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