White Collar

White Collar A classic from the Great Depression first published privately prior to World War II White Collar depicts the stock market crash Great Depression as well as the burgeoning Labor Movement The original

  • Title: White Collar
  • Author: Giacomo Patri
  • ISBN: 9780890871805
  • Page: 368
  • Format: Unknown Binding
  • A classic from the Great Depression first published privately prior to World War II White Collar depicts the stock market crash, Great Depression as well as the burgeoning Labor Movement The original publication was distributed at CIO Congress of Industrial Organizations conventions Introduction by Rockwell Kent Afterword by John L Lewis.

    One thought on “White Collar”

    1. This is probably one of the great graphic novels of our time. It is probably the most important story ever told. It is probably of great historical importance. It is probably all these things, but it isn't for me.It is a well done, wordless story of a man being pushed out of the white collar world by the Great Depression, and how he and his family suffers as he works to make a living. Life is unfair. Workers are not treated well. Greed is everywhere. The 1%s have it all. Hmm, sounds familiar.So, [...]

    2. I have rarely read a novel told simply in pictures before (well, since putting down picture books at the age of around three, that is!). I found this an interesting story, but whilst the art style was nice and consistent, and I very much liked the use of black and white throughout, I feel it would have been far more dramatic with the addition of text. The storyline as it stands is a little predictable, but it is still an important book about the human condition.

    3. I'd rather not go into the politics of this book: oh, so you're poor and evicted? – well then, just join a post-Depression Million Man March and pretend that will help get everything better; partly because, as I suggest, they can be facile, and partly because they're not the be-all and end-all of the book. Yes, it is a tale born out of socialism but it's a social commentary at work, and it's a very good one. Our hero is trying to make his path through life, which is visualised here, among many [...]

    4. I received an eARC of White Collar from the publisher via NetGalley, in exchange with an honest review .As a person who got the opportunity to lead the discussion on Blue Collar Jobs in my 2nd year of college, I was very thrilled when I read the title of this graphic novel.This book begins and ends with written paragraphs that explain what the book of White Collar is about. In between, you get to enjoy the amazing graphics that are used to show the story.The illustrations truly emphasized the st [...]

    5. A great read. I've always loved the dark style of woodcuts, so this graphic novel in linocuts was right up my alley. It feels quite modern, this one-picture-a-page, wordless (or nearly) story, so it's fascinating to know that it was made in the late thirties. The subject matter of white collar workers stuck in jobs seen from the outside as good, but who in fact struggle to make ends meet, is probably as relevant now, in the age of zero hour contract, of the freelancing of the economy, as ever.To [...]

    6. Wordless, this classic graphic novel portrays an epoch by expressing a social message through art. In this case, a picture is definitely worth a thousand words—or more. Thank you Netgalley! Full review.Muda, esta novela retrata una época y, al mismo tiempo, expresa un mensaje social a través del arte. En este caso es verdad que "una imagen dice más que mil palabras" (o incluso más). Reseña completa.

    7. White Collar: A Novel in Linocuts by Giacomo Patri is a free NetGalley e-graphic novel that I read in early September.Originally produced between 1937 and 1939 before being published in 1940, this is a replicated new edition of the autobiographical linocut graphic novel. It's intensely moving, progressive, intricate, and speaks so directly about the working class experience during the Great Depression.

    8. 'White Collar' by Giacomo Patri is a wordless story told in 128 linocuts. They tell the story of a worker who struggles and what happens to him. In a way, this book represents and early independent graphic novel.The book starts with a couple introductions. The first is for this edition and is written by the artist's son and stepson. This one gives biographical and historical context to the work that follows. The second introduction is by painter Rockwell Kent and was written in 1940. The afterwo [...]

    9. A great, impacting, and dark story of the depression told without text. Compelling and beautiful woodcuts tell the story of a family's downfall and rise. More would spoil the tale.

    10. *ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review, thanks again*White Collar is not for me. White Collar is a novel about a man who is pushed out of his job during the Great Depression and is told only in illustrations. The idea is interesting and the I can't say that the execution isn't, but something felt missing and I guess it's the personality. The illustrations felt just like illustrations, they didn't really give any character any personality, even tough the art was great.There r [...]

    11. Most of the time the book says it all, but in White Collar that was not the case. This graphic novel was 162 pages of pictures. Forcing the reader to assume what the book means. This novel was written by Giacomo Patri in 1938. It takes place during the Great Depression and has some connection with the Burgeoning Labor movement. The whole entire novel is done in linocuts which is a very laborious and (based on my past experiences) dangerous. The art in the novel is all black or orange and white. [...]

    12. The illustrations in this book are beautiful. The historical implications are well done and would lend itself to very deep discussions about white collar workers and America's work for history. This is another great read for those who enjoy nonfiction or American history.

    13. PRO-LABOR LINOLEUM ART"White Collar" is a 1938 wordless novel about the Great Depression (1929+), told entirely through the linocuts* of italian-born artist and social activist Giacomo Patri, who emigrated to the United States in 1916. Both Patri and his protagonist were mental workers with white shirts and pretty ties, and yet threatened by unemployment, exploitation and poverty just like the blue collar workers. They started reading pro-labor books and agitated among proletarized "heads", just [...]

    14. A great graphic novel. Silent and without real text. A beautiful example of sequential art and of art created towards social reform. Simple, yet striking. Truly shows what visual art can convey without worry for words.

    15. Fairly straight-forward. The design of the art is nice, but it's in single images/screens as opposed to panels, which I'm obviously not used to.

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