1848: Year Of Revolution

Year Of Revolution In a violent storm of revolutions ripped through Europe The torrent all but swept away the conservative order that had kept peace on the continent since Napoleon and traces its reverberations to

  • Title: 1848: Year Of Revolution
  • Author: Mike Rapport
  • ISBN: 9780316729659
  • Page: 235
  • Format: Unknown Binding
  • In 1848, a violent storm of revolutions ripped through Europe The torrent all but swept away the conservative order that had kept peace on the continent since Napoleon and traces its reverberations to the present day.

    One thought on “1848: Year Of Revolution”

    1. Last fall I read a biography of Napoleon, which was awesome. But as I finished, I was left wanting to know what happened next. In that review I noted that history as taught in America (at least where I went to school) focused on Europe until the beginnings of America and then totally shifted to American history. We did not learn about Europe between the end of the Revolutionary War and the beginning of WWI. I've picked up a little and that Napoleon book helped. This book did too. This book tells [...]

    2. Broad history of the momentous European revolutions of 1848. It was the year of the overthrow of French King Louis-Philippe, abolishment of serfdom in Austria and Hungary, and the establishment of the Frankfurt Assembly meeting to determine the unification of Germany. It is the year Metternich runs from Vienna while Bismarck begins to gain favour in Prussia; the bombardment and great seige of Venice; rise and fall of Kossuth's liberal Hungary, and the heroic return to Italy of the 'red-shirted' [...]

    3. This is a really fantastic overview of the Revolutions of 1848. Providing background on not just the relevant political history but also biographies of the major individuals, Rapport places the events solidly in context.What I liked about this book was that it explains the interplay between nationalism, the movement for democracy, republicanism (meaning elections but with restricted electorate), and "social" issues, meaning workplace/wage issues, hunger (in a time of extended economic downturn), [...]

    4. This was an interesting book, but it's very dense. Perhaps part of my issue is the way I read books these days, a few pages at bedtime, but it took a lot to keep track of everything; of everyone. Frankly, I kept wishing there had been some maps to refer to to keep track of all the nation states. The closing chapter, the Conclusion, did a good job of summarizing the whole. For me, it also probably would have been better to have read it on my Kindle, where I could have easily referred to the footn [...]

    5. Sorry read this long ago. To understand Minnesota, the Eastern Dakotas, western Wisconsin, and northern Iowa you have to read this book on purely European events. The people who fled their failed democratic socialist revolutions in Northern Europe, all ended up in these states. The closest we ever came the United States to a Marxist-Socialist Revolution, was the Bonus Marcher's in Washington DC that Hoovers Army (MacArthur and Patton) rode down with Cavalry and tanks. They were led by Socialists [...]

    6. This is what you might call a “general interest” history of the events that occurred in Europe in 1848. What started in Sicily quickly spread all over Europe: to France, Germany, Austria, the Italian states, Demark, Wallachia, Poland, and several other places. While almost no structural or political change actually took place as a result of these revolutions and therefore they are usually considered somewhat of a failure, it is often thought to be the historical location of the birth pangs o [...]

    7. Back in 2007 I read Freedom & Necessity by Steven Brust and Emma Bull; although I highly enjoyed it (really, it's a great book--China Miéville even says so!), I missed out on the historical context: "It is 1849. Across Europe, the high tide of revolution has crested" Revolution? Europe? Chartists? My knowledge of European history was (and still is) extremely poor, but I shrugged and kept reading. Four years later, with F&N on my to-reread shelf, I'm reminded again of my ignorance--but t [...]

    8. I wanted to love this book. I already love the topic and time period, so it should have been a cinch to love the book, too, right? Well. I'm sad to say this book was a slog. It jumped right into the fray without enough historical background on the events of 1848; I felt like I needed at least a B.A. in European history to swim and not sink in the depths to which Rapport immediately plunges. The narrative jumps around among countries, regions, and people so often that it was making me seasick. Ju [...]

    9. I struggled with this book. As an avid reader of Victorian-era history, I expected to love it, but Rapport doesn't give us enough of a story line to hang his facts on. And he provides a never-ending flow of facts, details, and trivia. Partly the problem is the subject -- he's trying to cover Germany, with all its little states, Italy, with ditto, Austria, France, Hungary, the UK, the Baltic states -- and on and on. Each one of these countries suffered some sort of cataclysm during the 1848-49 pe [...]

    10. Interesting period of time which I, admittedly knew nothing about. However, this book is very dense. I'd recommend it only to people with prior knowledge of the events and want to learn more about it or huge history buffs.

    11. If you are interested in 19th Century European History this book is a must read. It is very well written and is well balanced and engrossing. I wish I'd had Mr. Rapport as a professor in college!

    12. The events depicted in this book needed more than 400-ish pages. There is very little background about why the various revolutions happened in this single year which means that there is little context for what happened. Parts of the book felt muddled, trying to cram too much information into too small a space. There's not enough description of the personalities involved, and there were some very distinctive personalities in this period of European history.Parts of the book shine, though. The dep [...]

    13. I had a hard time with this book. Although the subject is of interest to me, I felt like it was too choppy. It was as if I needed to keep notes to remember what he had written about a place last. The flow was all wrong. This book is about the multitude of revolutions that changed the borders of Europe in just one year.

    14. Solidly done1848 is a solid work about the twists and turns in the 1848 revolutions. This detailed rendition if the events of 1848 shows how contingent social movements were and by no means deterministic.

    15. A reasonable review of this period. It includes many details and analyses. It suffers, however, from some discontinuity and relating the time and the effects of significant events to different places, rather treating the same event piecemeal in different sections.

    16. I read this book because of another book. Dierdre McCloskey points out repeatedly that after 1848 the intellectuals of Europe turned against capitalism for good. So when I spotted this book at Haslam's in St. Pete, I had to pick it up. WHY did intellectuals turn against capitalism, was my question. Well, "1848" turned out to be a very thorough review of the liberal revolts against the rulers of much of Europe. There were a lot of gems in the book that are very apropos to today, because nationali [...]

    17. The book “1848 Year of Revolution” has depicted series of revolutions happened in Europe especially in 1848. Following after the sparkle in Sicily first, nearly the whole Europe besides the United Kingdom, Russia and Netherland was affected by the wave of revolution. The most successful one might be the fall of July Monarchy and the establishment of the Second French Republic. Although the revolutions were brutally oppressed by kingdoms led by Habsburg, many people have first touched and exp [...]

    18. 1848 truly was the year of revolution; so many events that Mike Rapport spends 400 pages and gives us a panoramic glimpse. Rapport lectures in history at the University of Stirling in Scotland and emphasizes the stick-to-the-facts chronology. It’s refreshing not to be plagued by “it seems that” and “one must imagine.” The book is well-supported by research.I, however, longed for the approach of the superb Lords of Finance. The context of the times was easier to understand because of th [...]

    19. This book covers a set of uprisings in the year of the title spread widely over Europe - ranging from France to Romania. Many characters appear in more than one revolution and the interaction between the leading characters is well narrated giving a good sense of the intents and personalities taking part.The first half of the book introduces the uprisings and the parties involved while the second half details the build-up of the reactionary forces and the often tragic fractures between the variou [...]

    20. Three Favorite Passages:1. "Most patriots of 1848, in claiming national rights and freedoms for their own people, were in the process willing to trample on the liberties of others. All too soon the hard iron of national self-interest invariably won out over the more fragrant universal principles of 1848. Consequently, in many places where the 'national question' arose, Europeans would experience the brutalities of ethnic conflict, setting the revolutionaries against each other and providing the [...]

    21. This book focuses on the political aspects of the tumultuous year of revolutions, 1848. If you are looking for anything on the various battles of that year, look elsewhere; the pivotal fights are all disposed of in a paragraph of less.While an interesting read, it is by no means a page-turner. Partly, the history is a flood of personas who appear for a page and then disappear, never to be seen again. Mainly, it is the structure of the book, though. It is subdivided into the various phases of the [...]

    22. 1848 was a reasonably compact telling of the revolutions that began around that year and their results. Every kingdom (there were few nations yet) in Europe, even Russia and Britain was touched to some extent. The author did not talk about where the ideas that stirred up the trouble came from but they included desire for nationhood, broader suffrage, freedom for serfs/peasants, the right to own property, universal education, and freedom of the press, speech, and association. There were popular d [...]

    23. This is a really fantastic overview of the Revolutions of 1848. Providing background on not just the relevant political history but also biographies of the major individuals, Rapport places the events solidly in context.What I liked about this book was that it explains the interplay between nationalism, the movement for democracy, republicanism (meaning elections but with restricted electorate), and "social" issues, meaning workplace/wage issues, hunger (in a time of extended economic downturn), [...]

    24. First let me say that I applaud the author for his knowledge and the amount of information he is able to cram into this book on the 1848 Revolutions. I am impressed that he knows so very much about a wide-ranging group of people. He must have spent years researching information in multiple languages and I give him credit for all of this.However, for me, I had a really hard time with this book. I read dense history books all the time, but I had a difficult time following the story in this one. Th [...]

    25. Not an easy read due to the way it's organized, and the scope of the topic. The narrative covers the wave of revolution, and counter-revolution, that swept through Europe in 1848-9. It jumps from France, to the Hapsburg Empire, to the German Confederation, to Italy, and then cycles back around repeatedly. So many different people are introduced that it's very difficult to keep clear on who's who, and at each geographical jump one has to strain to recall what was going on in that location when la [...]

    26. Given that the Financial Times review calls this book "fully nuanced", its conclusions must be taken with a large grain of salt. This is quite the conservative acount of events and facts.P. 3o:" the 'social question'. This meant the problem of poverty and the dislocation caused by the painful economic transformation that was under way. Pauperism stemmed mostly from the sustained rise in population, which had begun in the mid-eighteenth century and continued relentlessly ever since. Ultimately, e [...]

    27. Much like how James McPherson's history of the US Civil War details how broader social issues triggered the conflict, Rapport wants to prove the events of 1848 were more than a series of events that happened concurrently, but rather were the result of European-wide social movements and conflicts from increasing industrialization and urbanization, movements that even impacted nations that didn't undergo violent conflicts. That's an argument Rapport succeeds in making, especially in his guiding th [...]

    28. The one issue with this book is a matter of style; the paragraphs and chapters were too long. Now, on to the good stuff! I learned a lot as this is a topic rarely discussed in our country. The revolutions of 1848 need to be remembered as the repercussions led to the European wars later in the century and of course the World Wars. It was this moment in history we first heard the names Emperor Franz Joseph, Giuseppe Garibaldi, and Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte. Democracy and republicanism had a real ch [...]

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