The Man in Lower Ten

The Man in Lower Ten Washington D C based attorney Lawrence Blakely has been asked by his partner to deliver some important documents to a client in Pittsburgh In the course of his return trip the occupant of the train

  • Title: The Man in Lower Ten
  • Author: Mary Roberts Rinehart
  • ISBN: 9780486814506
  • Page: 400
  • Format: Paperback
  • Washington, D.C based attorney Lawrence Blakely has been asked by his partner to deliver some important documents to a client in Pittsburgh In the course of his return trip, the occupant of the train berth opposite his the lower ten, which Blakely was supposed to have taken is savagely murdered Was Blakely the intended victim, and did the crime have something to doWashington, D.C based attorney Lawrence Blakely has been asked by his partner to deliver some important documents to a client in Pittsburgh In the course of his return trip, the occupant of the train berth opposite his the lower ten, which Blakely was supposed to have taken is savagely murdered Was Blakely the intended victim, and did the crime have something to do with his briefcase full of vital evidence When the murder weapon turns up underneath his pillow, Blakely becomes the prime suspect and is forced to stay one step ahead of the police in an increasingly deadly mystery.Written by Mary Roberts Rinehart, the American Agatha Christie, this was the first detective novel to crack national bestseller lists According to The New York Times, Rinehart s literary distinction lies in the combination of love, humor, and murder that she wove into her tales She helped the mystery story grow up The Man in Lower Ten was Rinehart s debut novel, and it remains a thrilling tale of homicide, mayhem, and romance.

    One thought on “The Man in Lower Ten”

    1. I have a soft spot for closed door mysteries, and ones taking place on a moving train are extra spine tingling. This one held a lot of promise. A man murdered in his train berth, stolen forgery notes, an irresistibly beautiful woman who holds the heart of two best friends, a broken and bloody necklace. Set in the early 1900's, when cars are referred to as "machines" and many unfortunate and outdated racial terms are still employed. Lawyers Blakely and McKnight feature as the main characters, wit [...]

    2. This book was first published in 1909, so all the caveats about different cultural norms apply. That said, it is quite readable today and gives an interesting look at a time removed from ours by almost a century with an emotional tenor that is timeless.

    3. Written by Mary Roberts Rinehart, "the American Agatha Christie," this was the first detective novel to crack national bestseller lists. According to The New York Times, "[Rinehart's] literary distinction lies in the combination of love, humor, and murder that she wove into her tales She helped the mystery story grow up." The Man in Lower Ten was Rinehart's debut novel, and it remains a thrilling tale of homicide, mayhem, romance. Attorney Lawrence Blakely is on a train bound to deliver some imp [...]

    4. A nicely atmospheric mystery of a bygone era. Attorney Lawrence Blakely becomes implicated when a murder is discovered on the overnight train he is travelling in. All the evidence points to Lawrence. To clear his name he pursues a convoluted trail to find out what really occurred on the Ontario that fateful night.There is quite a bit of substance to this mystery, a well developed "whodunit" that remains suspenseful until the end. Well worth the time.

    5. True, the technology is different (one photocopier could have changed the whole course of the book), and some of the manners. But it's still amazing to think that this was written more than a century ago. Lawyer Lawrence Blakeley is sent to Pittsburg to get a deposition from a millionaire; as he returns home with the important documents, he's involved in a train robbery, a murder, and a train wreck, from which he escapes with a lovely but troubled young woman. Instantly smitten for the first tim [...]

    6. This was kind of an odd one. I love Mary Roberts Rinehart – but this one was not quite up to where I expected it to be. Unfortunately it's one of those books where the unsolved mystery is more interesting than the solution. It's a great setup – rather dull lawyer fellow (with vivid best friend – I liked that the kind of boring one was the narrator) goes off to get some very important papers for a very important case, and on the train ride home has them stolen. And also comes in as the best [...]

    7. Lies, murder, romance, a train wreck? Lawrence Blakeley has a disagreeable task, he has to deliver a statement and some forged bank notes to Pittsburgh. The lawyer ends up in a muddle of adventure which leads to him being labeled a murderer First he loses everything, clothes, shoes, and worst of all the bag with the bank notes; and then he finds a murdered man in his berth and guess what, the murder weapon is also found in his possession Then there's Ms. West his colleague's mysterious love inte [...]

    8. Edging more into thriller than mystery (and driven by some major-league coincidences), this was moderately entertaining (though I probably wouldn't have picked it up if I'd known most of the story revolved around people being wrongly suspected and having to clear their name, which isn't a plotline I enjoy).

    9. While I realize this was written several decades ago, before forensics became so much more important to solving crimes, I didn't understand why the private detective got to hang on to the evidence--why on earth didn't the police have the evidence in their possession? They seemed to think it was OK for the private detective to have it.

    10. Murder, suicide, forged papers, a train derailment. This is one entertaining book. It’s also very (intentionally) funny. There is some melodrama as well. This book was first published in 1909, and it was clearly a different world. This is reflected in the writing.There are a few spots were the action is not crystal clear, but becomes clear in further reading of the text. I think this is the author’s style. This was my first Mary Roberts Rinehart. I would read along and feel as if I missed so [...]

    11. I think by now that everyone knows I'm hooked on Mary Roberts Rinehart. After being introduced to her last year by Yvette of in so many words, I don't think it's been possible for me to get enough of the twists and turns she develops her mysteries with. I've even found myself rooting for the couples that Roberts pushed together as they faced danger and possible death.I think it's also safe to assume that most of us realize that just because you love an author, doesn't mean you are going to love [...]

    12. In 1909 this book was a top 10 best seller for the year. Famous as the grand dame of the American mystery genre ("the butler did it" is attributed to Rhinehart), I have stumbled over references to her books and plots a number of times. I was curious to read it and found it an exquisite period piece that allows you to be swept into the world of 1909 America that is modern enough for you to see the rich details and differences with 100 years ago. Mundane descriptions and actions about traveling in [...]

    13. 4.5 stars. An intricate, fun old-fashioned mystery! Lawrence Blakely, a lawyer traveling by train with some important documents, is forced by circumstances to go to sleep in the wrong berth, and wakes up in yet another wrong berth to discover that the man in the first one has been murdered, the important documents have been stolen, and he's been left in possesion of only the presumed murderer's clothes, shoesd murder weapon! Following the wreck of the train, Blakely must join forces with some ot [...]

    14. I enjoy classic "murder on a train" mysteries, but this one suffered from a predictable love story and a tendency to jump forward and refer back to events that hadn't yet unfolded, as in "Had Harrington slept in his own berth, none of this would have happened" -- before the reader is acquainted with who Harrington is, for example. This got more than a little tiresome. On the plus side, references to travel and domestic arrangements circa 1909 provided plenty of interest. At one point, the protag [...]

    15. What a joy it was to read this book. Narrated by Lawrence Blakely, the “senior” partner of Blakely and McKnight, Attorneys, the story is fast-paced, thrilling, amusing, highly entertaining, and with colorful characters on all sides of the law and from all classes. The detectives involved in this case are “Johnson” and a young, ambitious man who considers himself a detective and becomes closely entwined with the two law partners as the “plot thickens.” I’m very excited to be startin [...]

    16. Find this and the rest of my reviews at feministquill.wordpress/2Plot Description: A mystery novel involving a murder, a theft, two cases of switched berths, cases of mistaken identity, a train crash, multiple women that the protagonist cannot distinguish properly between due to a condition known as casual-sexistitis, dated English, and an idiot who thinks he's in love.[Insert Spoiler Alert here]This book appeared in my collection of Agatha Christie novels, and I began to read it under the assu [...]

    17. I read Mary Roberts Rinehart as a teenager, so I was intrigued to see that one of her books is back in print. My memory of her books is extremely vague, but, after reading The Man in Lower Ten, I'm sure the writing style and engaging characters must have been what made them so popular even then. I really enjoyed the narrator's voice in The Man in Lower Ten. He's Lawrence Blakely, a lawyer, a confirmed bachelor (At the age of thirty! What a sign of the times!), and soft-hearted towards unfamiliar [...]

    18. A fun who-done-it that has aged well over the last 100 years, The Man in Lower Ten never takes itself too seriously, and yet manages to follow a serious case with the appropriate gravity. Turn of the (last) century attorney Mr. Lawrence has important papers that can convict a man. However, his friend and law firm partner senses he's in danger. Soon he finds himself in the middle of a murder investigation - a far cry from the forgery case he was working on. Mr. Lawrence is really having the worst [...]

    19. Although the first publication date is given as 1909, this refers to the issuing of a hardback edition. The Man In Lower Ten was originally a serial, dating from 1906 and is the author’s first work.These facts help,I think, to explain the rather fragmented/ choppy style and the episodic nature of the story which I found difficult to take.The story is fairly typical of its era, very melodramatic and with the strong love interest nearly overwhelming the mystery.The author is often referred to as [...]

    20. I read this because I grew up in the town where the author lived, and I always thought I should read something of hers. In her day, she was hugely popular, and her books made her wealthy. But this book is dated to say the least, and she is unlikely to enjoy a revival anytime soon. The language, like the manners, are stilted and self conscious. No one really talked like this, not even in Rinehart's day, though a polite author was expected to make the reader think they did. There's the casual raci [...]

    21. I don't know if it's the hot weather or if I'm losing it but this novel was impenetrable for me - 20 pages in and I couldn't make heads or tails of the characters or where they were going or who was what and why. And when the the love interest appears, purely in photograph, with hands clasped demurely in front of her youthful, slim figure my eyes nearly rolled out of my head; what I wouldn't give for a heroine that's like a smooth 20 pounds overweight. I understand that this novel is both using [...]

    22. In the last 20% of this book I suddenly started worrying about how all the somewhat confusing leads would tie up. Then I started getting irritated. Plot holes started jumping out at me. The characters weren't holding my interest. The romance kind of fizzled a bit because of the other problems. I finished, having enjoyed the humor and some of the story, but an annoying wrap up loses points. Not that this is the Olympics or anything- it's a decent enough read for a snowy weekend or laid up with a [...]

    23. Oooooh so good!! Mary Robert Rinehart is really the twin sister of Agatha Christie in mystery literature. Here we have the laid back, rather content with his placid life lawyer, the completely Irish and warm hearted friend and co-owner of the lawyer firm, the three very confusing and mysterious women-how are they all connected?? And the chilling murder in Lower ten on a moving train, in the middle of the night! A wreck, a broken necklace and a light that goes up and down the stairs of an abandon [...]

    24. This book was copyrighted in 1909 and the two young main characters spoke in a slang of that age that defies augury. But still, as in all Roberts books, a decent mystery and interesting characters leading to a very surprising and satisfying ending.

    25. Too long. Started out great but had to force myself to skim a lot of the pages just so I could get to the parts about the main mystery and hurry up and complete it.

    26. Riveting, murder mysteryI thoroughly enjoyed this adventure as I experienced the twists and turns to the end. A classic in every sense of the word.

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