A Secret History of Memphis Hoodoo: Rootworkers, ConjurersSpirituals

A Secret History of Memphis Hoodoo Rootworkers ConjurersSpirituals Widely known for its musical influence Beale Street was also once a hub for Hoodoo culture Many blues icons such as Big Memphis Ma Rainey and Sonny Boy Williamson dabbled in the mysterious traditio

  • Title: A Secret History of Memphis Hoodoo: Rootworkers, ConjurersSpirituals
  • Author: Tony Kail
  • ISBN: 9781467137393
  • Page: 405
  • Format: Paperback
  • Widely known for its musical influence, Beale Street was also once a hub for Hoodoo culture Many blues icons, such as Big Memphis Ma Rainey and Sonny Boy Williamson, dabbled in the mysterious tradition Its popularity in some African American communities throughout the past two centuries fueled racial tension practitioners faced social stigma and blame for anything fromWidely known for its musical influence, Beale Street was also once a hub for Hoodoo culture Many blues icons, such as Big Memphis Ma Rainey and Sonny Boy Williamson, dabbled in the mysterious tradition Its popularity in some African American communities throughout the past two centuries fueled racial tension practitioners faced social stigma and blame for anything from natural disasters to violent crimes However, necessity sometimes outweighed prejudice, and even those with the highest social status turned to Hoodoo for prosperity, love or retribution Author Tony Kail traces this colorful Memphis heritage, from the arrival of Africans in Shelby County to the growth of conjure culture in juke joints and Spiritual Churches.

    One thought on “A Secret History of Memphis Hoodoo: Rootworkers, ConjurersSpirituals”

    1. This is a fantastic book that shows where hoodoo came from, how it entered Memphis, how it survived here and where it is still seen today. I love how the author blended facts, like the types of roots used in rituals and the history of Memphis based companies that made hoodoo products, with stories from people who practice hoodoo. The stories to me really helped show how the materials discussed were actually used. As well as the book progress it shows how people in Memphis felt about hoodoo and t [...]

    2. Kail isn't exactly a great writer, but he keeps rhetorical flourishes to a minimum and lets his research and the interesting history carry your attention. It's like reading a very long, very interesting article.

    3. Who knew Hoodoo was so prevalent?I heard Tony Kail speak at the 1st Annual Mystic South Conference and realized that some of my family's practices were based in Hoodoo even though they are devout Baptists.

    4. Very interesting anthropological work on an aspect of southern history & society I didn't really know anything about.

    5. I have quibbles and I kind of wish it had been more in-depth. But it's a solid introduction and his bibliography is nice.

    6. Memphis has long been proud of it's strangeness and this adds to the story. I wanted more than what is given here and felt like the surface was skimmed. When you tell Memphis stories their nature is somewhat sketchy but this account jumps in time and place like a Beale St. "Flipper". What little I found here makes me want more about the people and their life and times and thinking of the "roots men/women". I also was left wanting to know about the commercial operations that these beliefs spawned [...]

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