Utopian Communities of Florida: A History of Hope

Utopian Communities of Florida A History of Hope Florida has long been viewed as a land of hope and endless possibilities Visionaries seeking to establish new communities where they could escape the influences of society at large have turned to Flor

  • Title: Utopian Communities of Florida: A History of Hope
  • Author: Nick Wynne Joe Knetsch
  • ISBN: 9781467136884
  • Page: 198
  • Format: Paperback
  • Florida has long been viewed as a land of hope and endless possibilities Visionaries seeking to establish new communities where they could escape the influences of society at large have turned to Florida to construct their utopias from the vast plantations of British philanthropists and entrepreneurs in the eighteenth century to the exotic Koreshan Unity and its theFlorida has long been viewed as a land of hope and endless possibilities Visionaries seeking to establish new communities where they could escape the influences of society at large have turned to Florida to construct their utopias from the vast plantations of British philanthropists and entrepreneurs in the eighteenth century to the exotic Koreshan Unity and its theory that humans live in the center of a Hollow Earth Some came to the Sunshine State seeking religious freedom, such as the settlers in Moses Levy s Jewish colony, while others settled in Florida to establish alternative lifestyles, like the spiritualists of Cassadaga Still others created their communities to practice new agricultural techniques or political philosophies Historians Joe Knetsch and Nick Wynne examine a number of these distinctive utopian communities and how they have contributed to Florida s unique social fabric.

    One thought on “Utopian Communities of Florida: A History of Hope”

    1. Interesting stuff, if a little superficial. There was a lot of material about how these communities got started, what they stood for, and, in some cases, why they died out (congrats to the Spiritualists of Cassadaga who are the only ones still going!) but very little about what life was like in those communities.

    2. I'm a Florida native and wanted to enjoy this but I think it misses the forest for the trees--focusing on mundane details about life in these communities rather than what the utopians' dreams were and why Florida has appealed to so many of these dreamers.

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