The Kurdish Bike:A Novel

The Kurdish Bike A Novel Gold Medal Best Regional Fiction Independent Publishers Book Contest and First Place Best Fiction of North Street Book Contest Courageous teachers wanted to rebuild war torn nation With

  • Title: The Kurdish Bike:A Novel
  • Author: Alesa Lightbourne
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 155
  • Format: Paperback
  • Gold Medal, Best Regional Fiction, Independent Publishers Book Contest 2017 and First Place, Best Fiction of 2017, North Street Book Contest Courageous teachers wanted to rebuild war torn nation With her marriage over and life gone flat, Theresa Turner responds to an online ad, and lands at a school in Kurdish Iraq Befriended by a widow in a nearby village, Theresa is eGold Medal, Best Regional Fiction, Independent Publishers Book Contest 2017 and First Place, Best Fiction of 2017, North Street Book Contest Courageous teachers wanted to rebuild war torn nation With her marriage over and life gone flat, Theresa Turner responds to an online ad, and lands at a school in Kurdish Iraq Befriended by a widow in a nearby village, Theresa is embroiled in the joys and agonies of traditional Kurds, especially the women who survived Saddam s genocide only to be crippled by age old restrictions, brutality and honor killings Theresa s greatest challenge will be balancing respect for cultural values while trying to introduce enlightened attitudes toward women at the same time seeking new spiritual dimensions within herself The Kurdish Bike is gripping, tender, wry and compassionate an eye opener into little known customs in one of the world s most explosive regions a novel of love, betrayal and redemption.

    One thought on “The Kurdish Bike:A Novel”

    1. I’m so happy to discover another author I completely enjoy. This book gets 5 stars for multiple reasons. First, it’s a debut novel of literary fiction, and to create an excellent book the first time in this genre deserves big applause.Second, the story is based on experiences the author had while teaching English in Kurdistan. The characters are melds of people she knew at the time. The whole comes together as very real, so real that the reader feels s/he knows the characters too, and wants [...]

    2. All my preconceptions of this book said "stay away"--self published book, the topic is bound to be depressing. But those were wrong. I've worked as an editor, and this book has none of the shortcomings of many self-published books. It's carefully conceived and executed, so there's not one distracting nit in it's publication.Depressing? No. Scary? Yep. But all the scary bits show Theresa's courage and commitment to her values. I admire her willingness to take risks for the sake of making somebody [...]

    3. This was a fascinating read for me and one that I could very much relate to, as an overseas educator. Based on Lightbourne's own experiences of teaching in a school in Iraq, I thoroughly enjoyed her depictions of the students, administrators of the school, and the personalities of her fellow teachers. Her story about befriending an Iraqi family, what I believe was the fictional part of the book, was woven in nicely giving the book another dimension, while portraying what it is like to be a femal [...]

    4. The Kurdish Bike was an enthralling, lyrical novel that shared a perspective rarely portrayed in modern literature. The writing absorbed me. Not only did I imagine myself as the American protagonist, but I entered the minds and hearts of the Kurdish women whom the protagonist befriends. Now when I read the news about Iraq and Syria and the Kurds, I see more than a barrage of foreign sounding names and places and numbers. I see people. Thank you, Alesa, for this gift.

    5. I loved this book. Books having to do with the Middle East always interest me. This is a region that the author says is “older than the flood.” It is a land that has been ruled at one time or another by the Assyrians, the Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Parthians, Romans, Islamic Arabs, Mongols, and Ottomans. I was really enthralled with this part of the book. The protagonist Theresa is an American teacher working in Iraqi Kurdistan. Unlike the other expat teachers assig [...]

    6. The Kurdish Bike works on many levels. Billed as a novel, it has the direct feeling and intensity of a memoir- which the afterword reveals it in some part is. This is a deeply personal story of connections between people from very different cultures, their strong affection and profound differences. In particular, the ways in which women in both American and Kurdish societies deal with the burdens placed on them by their societies- particularly by males- are illustrated with subtlety and insight. [...]

    7. The Kurdish Bike recounts the experiences of Theresa Turner, an American teacher who takes up a teaching job in Iraqi Kurdistan. In addition to financial troubles and emotional baggage from a previously failed marriage, Theresa's new environment proves to be challenging, made even more daunting by her new school's rigid guidelines. Determined to make the most of this new chapter in her life, Theresa gets herself a blue bike and sets about exploring a nearby village. She befriends a local mother- [...]

    8. Review THE KURDISH BIKE by Alesa LightbourneNot only do I rank this novel among the top 10 of all I’ve read, I just was gifted at my book club with an in-person slide show presentation by the author on “The Real Story,” complete with maps, an outline of the history of the area, photos of the characters (all names changed) she depicted so vividly, both in the private school she taught at in Kurdish Iraq in 2010, and the extended family she befriends and visited weekly in the novel and twice [...]

    9. One of the best books I have read. Perfectly written, easy to follow. Very Authentic due to the fact that the author doesn't show even slightest form of cultural bias and just tell things as they are. It is a kind of books that takes you to the set, so real that you don't see yourself as an observer but as a part of the story. The comparison between the lives of Kurdish women and an America woman is very interesting. It transcended cultural barriers and shows that being a women is difficult whet [...]

    10. Timely Must Read – perfect for book groupsI was really impressed with the Kurdish Bike. It is a good read, well written, paced, and draws you into the awesome story of a woman teacher from the Northwest struggling with culture, sticky teaching challenges, and the realities of the Kurdish people. At the midway point in the book, I couldn’t put it down, and stayed up late reading, which I rarely do.The book provides a glimpse into the human impacts of Saddam Hussein’s reign of terror on the [...]

    11. The Kurdish Bike does what all good books should do: allows you to escape your present life and become immersed in a world unlike your own. I felt like I was right there with narrator Theresa Turner living through her experiences as they unfolded in this desolate part of the world that so few of us know or understand.This is a remarkable story about life in an area of the Mideast that has suffered through the ravages of war and left it's people poverty stricken and disenfranchised. A story that [...]

    12. What a delightful read. And Lesa provides a first-person (and personal) insight into a part of the world that is far away from us, both geographically and emotionally. If one has never had an experience of living and working in an environment that, for most of us, would be unfamiliar and unsettling in its differences, this story helps us build just the smallest bridge between our comfortable daily lives and that of a different culture. The efforts of this small group of expats living in a war-to [...]

    13. I downloaded this as I love to read about adventures in other parts of the world. This book has Teresa, a 50- some American teacher, recently divorced and financially wiped out by her ex-husband. She seeks change and takes a position teaching in a for profit school in Kurdistan. Life is grim but she buys a bike and sets out, in her spare time, to explore the nearby villages. Theresa meets Bezma, a village girl, and her life gives her a peek into the lives of women in third world countries This p [...]

    14. I just can't imagine being transported to such a culturally different place! I would love to go in a time machine, safe bubble that could zap me in and out at a moment's notice. All the women, children and families that have the same feelings as everyone around the world. Sure must change you!Alesa came to our book group to share the "behind the scenes" of her book and it was amazing! To hear her tell her story in her own words and with her emotions was wonderful! She even brought her Kurdish at [...]

    15. My book club has both men and women in it, with people living in several different countries. We all raved about this book. We kept wondering how much of it is true -- because practically everything seems true. In parts it was funny. In other parts it was unbearably sad. It's super easy to read, but also has a lot of classy literary touches that makes me think it's going to become a best seller. I want to read more from this amazing author!

    16. Worth readingI downloaded this book to my Kindle out of curiosity about the Kurdish people. What a wonderful reading experience! I enjoy reading about other countries and cultures and this book didn't disappoint. It's loosely based on the author's experience in Kurdish Iraq. I felt like I was actually there, enjoying the food and fellowship with a Kurd family. Well written, credible characters and educational.

    17. four and a half starsMy thanks to the author for the gift of this book.The fictionalized account of the author's time spent teaching in Kurdish Iraq and the friends shefound there. Painful subjects are dealt with and yet is interesting rather than painful to read.Perhaps because the story moves on quickly and the characters, although from a different culture,are easy to understand. Just like people everywhere.If you love humanity you will love this book.

    18. An ancient culture and a blonde foreigner on a bike sharing both joy and sadness. Ms. Lightbourne has the most caring heart and urge to be of service while living in the moment. She brought her own radiance to a dusty distant land and people who learned to love her. The world would change in an instant if more people followed her lead. Bravo for your sincerity and openness!

    19. I had a difficult time putting this book down. The author's voice was clear, I could hear her speaking - also I could see her in the school and village as I read the book. This is an interesting glimpse of a world that is very different from the one I currently live in. Reading this has made me want to try teaching abroad.

    20. I enjoyed this read for this most part. If you would like to know more about the 21st century Iraqi culture from the standpoint of an American teacher, this is a easy, detailed read. However, I wish there were a Volume 2 of the book I felt as though I were left with more questions about the characters and their outcomes than I prefer when reading this type of novel.

    21. As a millennial who never knew much about Kurdistan, it was enlightening to learn about Kurdish culture through the perspective of an American woman. I loved this story and would totally recommend this book to anybody who is curious about life outside their own backyard!

    22. An exceptional read. Beautifully written. Your senses are sucked up experiencing the suffering and the joys of a unknown culture. It does not take long to be reminded that our differences are not nearly as great as our sameness. A must adventure for you to take!

    23. This is a great book! It is an opportunity to learn about Kurdish culture (and the ex-pat teacher culture) while reading a great and moving story. It is well written, touching and educational. I recommend it highly.

    24. The characters in this book are fascinating and kept me turning the pages to see how their story would unfold. I hope the author writes a sequel so I can keep in touch with my friends.

    25. Amazing, educational, heart warming and heart renching. Wonderful story about the connection and bonds formed between a teacher and the women in a small village in Kurdistan.

    26. This book was so amazing to read. It is easy to get lost inside it as you read. I have always wondered what it is like to live in Kurdistan so now I have a glimpse. Thanks, Alesa!11

    27. Sections of this book were good, but there were so many things that were absolutely stupid. Her former husband treated his first wife horribly in their divorce, but she's surprised when he does the same thing to her. After the divorce she keeps her accounts in the same bank that she had when she was married, and then is surprised when the bank takes her money to pay her former husband's debts. Her Kurdish friend is noticeably gaining weight in the stomach and breasts before the wedding, so she m [...]

    28. With her marriage over, an "OLD LADY"-57 years old-ends up in Kurdistan as a teacher to young Kurd students. She ends up befriended people in the village (against the school rules) and starts to bond with the people of Kurdistan. Many things present themselves to her through her new relationships and she has to come to understand the culture and what is accepted and what is not. I thoroughly enjoyed this book-especially that she was trying to make a difference at this stage in her life! This is [...]

    29. It’s a great read selected by our book club. It is well written and an easy read. The author takes us to a teaching job accepted at the drop of a hat in Iraq in an unusual school system. But the highlights were her adventures on the Blue Angel exploring the villages and countryside, sharing the culture, values, and mores of the Kurdish Iraqis. Well worth it.

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