Bandhan: The Making of a Bank

Bandhan The Making of a Bank This is the story of Bandhan the only bank that emerged in eastern India after Independence Founded by the son of a sweet vendor with a mere Rs lakh the sum total of his life savings On June

  • Title: Bandhan: The Making of a Bank
  • Author: Tamal Bandyopadhyay
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 111
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • This is the story of Bandhan, the only bank that emerged in eastern India after Independence Founded by the son of a sweet vendor, with a mere Rs 2 lakh, the sum total of his life savings.On 17 June, 2015, Chandra Shekhar Ghosh stepped out of the Reserve Bank of India building in Mumbai with the much coveted banking licence, beating some of the country s top corporate houThis is the story of Bandhan, the only bank that emerged in eastern India after Independence Founded by the son of a sweet vendor, with a mere Rs 2 lakh, the sum total of his life savings.On 17 June, 2015, Chandra Shekhar Ghosh stepped out of the Reserve Bank of India building in Mumbai with the much coveted banking licence, beating some of the country s top corporate houses This moment compensated for all the frustrations that had come along the way A year later, Bandhan Bank was launched with 6.7 million small borrowers.So, how did Ghosh build India s biggest MFI from scratch and then, along with his team, transform it into a universal bank Bandhan The Making of a Bank chronicles that journey.This is also Ghosh s personal story of a boy growing up in small town Agartala struggling with poverty, but relentless in his ambition to make it big He battles competition, hostile moneylenders, a tough economic climate and the perpetual lack of resources Nobody in India perhaps knows better than him the psyche of a small borrower and the alchemy of doing business with the poor, profitably.This is one of India s biggest entrepreneurial stories.

    One thought on “Bandhan: The Making of a Bank”

    1. The book is interesting in parts, and the reason for that is either the editor or the author.Tamal's writing makes for easy reading. He starts off with a chapter on what happens when Bandhan becomes a bank. He then moves back to the origin of the idea of Bandhan, and even before that. My issue with the book was the constant back and forth across timelines in each chapter, as well sometimes within a page. Not sure what purpose is achieved by say an event in 2009, followed by an event in 2012, and [...]

    2. BANDHAN - NGO to a BANKThis book offers insight in to how a micro finance institution coverts to a full fledged financial institution. It is very informative as it gives a brief history about rural credit system and micro finance scenario in India. It is an inspirational story on many levels. It is about how Chandra Sekhar Ghosh transforms a small organization in to a financial institution/bank. Author also mentions about people like Vijay Mahajan and Vishnu Akula who played an important role in [...]

    3. This book is certainly not what I expected and it blew me away. This book is part history, part business, part biography and a must read for those who are interested in financial inclusion and rural banking. Tamal has deep knowledge of the Indian banking industry and the nuggets of information that he gives will probably not be found anywhere. Mainly this book deals with the trials and tribulations of Sanjay Ghosh who set up an NGO to empower the poor which turned into a microfinance which turne [...]

    4. Not Particular Insights from this book Its too many characters and there is no flow to the book. Its like reading facts facts facts from the annual report or from the news paper etc.The sad part is the author is in the Board of the Bandhan. P.S : I stopped midway reading this book Dont want to waste my time, Moved on to the next one.

    5. What could have been a very interesting subject turns out a drab compilation of sequence of events in Bandhan’s journey. Lots of dates, names , branches thrown around with which reader cant connect with Ghosh’s struggles in building Bandhan. Ok for a one time read given the upcoming IPO

    6. I absolutely loved the book because it gives insights about Micro Finance industry. It talks about how MF helps people coming out of poverty. It also talks about what almost killed micro finance industry. How political people for votes kill an industry and actually play with future of people indirectly. This book also gives glimpses of various Govt. schemes which failed because of corruption and poor lending practices as they were necessarily freebes. MFI's were no saints in totality but the reg [...]

    7. Bandhan's story from NGO to microfinance institution and current transformation into a universal bank along with excerpts on founder Ghosh's management style makes this book a very interesting read.

    8. The book is very informative and gives a very good insight into the workings of a Microfinance Institution. However, the quality of editing wasn't very good. The chapters were not organised well and seemed quite disconnected.

    9. The book is a great insight into making of Bandhan bank, how it started and became a Bank. Till the bank was given license it was not known and its founder Chandra Shekhar Ghosh's story should be told. the appendix has chronicled the entire history of Rural credit from few centuries back. It also covers SKS Microfinance/Vikram Akula and BSFL/Baxis/Vijay Mahajan. So, not just Bandhan but entire Microfinance industry in India. Very good read for people interested in credit, poverty alleviation and [...]

    10. Though the book has the heart is at the right place in terms of what the book intends to say but it goes too much into detail leading it to becoming tedious and boring in some parts.The author fails to keep the reader interested throughout the book though he does give some interesting insight into the thinking behind the man.

    11. The making of Bandhan Bank and Mr Ghosh's personal involvement in making it happen makes a very interesting story. I found the narrative style too journalistic and rough and beyond a point found it difficult to complete the book.

    12. An easy read, borders more along the lines of a sponsored book, not much intrigue/stimulation, bit of drama in the way it started. Could read in spare time sort of a book.

    13. Hatsoff to Tamal Sir. This book combines the virtues of a journalist with the detailed look at micro finance business through a journey of the life of a visionary leader Mr. Chandra Shekhar Ghosh

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