The Empty Nest: 31 Parents Tell the Truth About Relationships, Love, and Freedom After the Kids Fly the Coop

The Empty Nest Parents Tell the Truth About Relationships Love and Freedom After the Kids Fly the Coop A heartwarming wry and often surprising collection of essays about the next rite of passage for Baby Boomers what happens when the kids leave homeAs the baby boom generation ages the oldest are now

  • Title: The Empty Nest: 31 Parents Tell the Truth About Relationships, Love, and Freedom After the Kids Fly the Coop
  • Author: Karen Stabiner
  • ISBN: 9781401302573
  • Page: 354
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A heartwarming, wry, and often surprising collection of essays about the next rite of passage for Baby Boomers what happens when the kids leave homeAs the baby boom generation ages the oldest are now turning sixty many of them are learning to deal with a whole new way of life, after the last child has finally moved out and they are, once again, alone It s the sameA heartwarming, wry, and often surprising collection of essays about the next rite of passage for Baby Boomers what happens when the kids leave homeAs the baby boom generation ages the oldest are now turning sixty many of them are learning to deal with a whole new way of life, after the last child has finally moved out and they are, once again, alone It s the same milestone their own parents faced, but as with so many other markers, this generation approaches it in a whole new way.In this fascinating collection, journalist Karen Stabiner has assembled essays from thirty one writers about their own experience with the empty nest Parents whose children left home last week join those with grandchildren to explore how life changes once the offspring leave unless, of course, they move back in again later They represent the full range of experience from traditional nuclear families to single parents to gay parents to grandparents with humor, grace, and poignancy.

    One thought on “The Empty Nest: 31 Parents Tell the Truth About Relationships, Love, and Freedom After the Kids Fly the Coop”

    1. I happened across this one while I was browsing at the library and, since I'm still in the throes of empty-nesting myself, decided to give it a whirl. It's a compilation of essays, and the variety of stories and styles keep it fresh.At least, for a while. After eight or ten of them, a certain predictability creeps in. Youngest or only child is going away to college, parent reminisces on the upbringing experience with a dollop of parent's own upbringing thrown in for ballast. At the end of the da [...]

    2. I read this book for a couple of reasons, one, because the last of my two children moved out over Christmas and the other, for research for a book I am writing. I found the essays quite useful in helping me to understand how I feel about the kids being gone. I wish there hadn't been so much emphasis on the college experience because to me that's just the dress rehearsal; there was only really one essay (by Ellen Goodman) that explored the years after college and how adult children and parents re [...]

    3. The writing was good, but there was sort of a solipsistic tone to this collection of essays about children leaving home. If there is one place where reflection into one's interior state seems easy to overdo, it is in relation to one's children. Too many of the authors fell into the standard theme that while it is a transition seeing one's children leaving to enter the world, it brings freedom and new life for the parents along with it. Perhaps the book would have been better if it had been sub-d [...]

    4. Not great -- but, mostly because I expected something else. Would have been nice to have known that the list of writers were all well, writers. They're big name, serious authors, with a need to explain their perspective on life -- it was only minimally helpful (for me) from the perspective of "how to deal with kids leaving for college, or leaving for life" I wasn't helped a bunch.It was good to see how many different ways a couple or an individual can approach this "phase" of life. Only a few il [...]

    5. With my two girls in college and one about to graduate, I finally admitted it was time to read this book that had been recommended by a friend at work. I was really able to relate to the thoughts and feelings of the authors of these essays - and it's always good to know that you're not alone as you figure out how to adjust to the absence of the children you love more than anything else in the world. Even if it feels right and good, it's still hard.

    6. It was comforting to read about other parents struggling through the same feelings I am. I especially loved the part about "the crying cure" from the mom who forced herself to cry and cry and cry about her son leaving home so that she would be able to not shed a tear at the airport when she dropped him off, as per his request.

    7. A MUST read for every empty nester (or almost empty nester) The collection of essays were oh so true and so well described that I found myself laughing out loud in recognition. Engaging and endearing stories that will pull at your heart strings.

    8. I read this book with hopes it would help me garner some sympathy for my future mother in-law. At moments it did, but then the next thing I knew, I was annoyed. This book is touching - then indulgent - then sappy - then tender - then annoying - then repeat.

    9. The book would have been better with more socioeconomic and geographic variety in its contributors. Still, probably a good discussion starter for book clubs that have recent empty nesters.

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