The Return of the Indian

The Return of the Indian The Magic Continues In The Indian In The Cupboard Omri discovers a wonderful magical world when a three inch high Indian named Little Bear came to life Now in The Return Of The Indian Omri tries

  • Title: The Return of the Indian
  • Author: Lynne Reid Banks Bill Geldart
  • ISBN: 9780833509024
  • Page: 461
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Magic Continues .In The Indian In The Cupboard, Omri discovers a wonderful, magical world when a three inch high Indian named Little Bear came to life Now, in The Return Of The Indian, Omri tries to see his friend Little Bear again, and lands in the middle of a whole new series of astonishing and dangerous adventures from which he may never escape

    One thought on “The Return of the Indian”

    1. I am not sure why Lynne Reid Banks feels the need to ruin these great books with coarse words. The Indian in the Cupboard series are great. Boys and girls both love them. There isn't much that could be more exciting to a child than their toys coming to life. But is it necessary to us a--, and other words similar to this in a child's book? I just finished reading this aloud to my children. They loved it. I edited out the words that weren't necessary as I was going.

    2. Overall, the Return of the Indian was a good book, but not amazing. The Indian in the Cupboard, the first book of the series, was more exciting, yet this was a good enough sequel. It has more problems and drama when Little Bear demands "now-guns," his name for modern guns. However, him and his tribe have no training on how to use them, and trouble occurs Banks doesn't explain the characters as well as the first book.

    3. "The Return of the Indian", the sequel to "The Indian in the Cupboard", is about a boy named Omri, a boy named Patrick, a miniature Native American brave called Little Bear, and a miniature Native American squaw called Bright Stars. When Omri opens his magic cupboard again (after keeping it closed for a year) he finds that his best friend Little Bear is now an Indian Chief and he has been wounded. Omri and Patrick must help the wounded Little Bear. As Little Bear recovers, he tells them of the F [...]

    4. In my humble little opinion this book is practically equal in its appeal to the first, which can be tricky for a sequel.The magic is still there and its still a charming story, with the added bonus of extra characters such as Matron and Corporal Fickits.I love the way the dialogue is written especially that of Little Bull and Boone, and the author has really made it very easy to fully imagine the personality of each little person.I've read descriptions of the remaining books in this series, and [...]

    5. The Return of the Indian is the second of the Indian in the Cupboard series. After a year of keeping the cupboard locked, Omri decides to see Little Bear again.When Omri brings Little Bear back to life he learns first hand the brutality of war. In an effort to help Little Bear win the war, Omri and his friends interfere first by sending weapons back and then by going back themselves.See, it's not the cupboard that's magic, it's actually the key. But what and who can go back isn't exactly explain [...]

    6. Picking up a year after the events of the first book, The Return of the Indian lacks a lot of the power and insight of the The Indian in the Cupboard. Omri's family has moved to a bigger house in a rougher neighborhood, his friend Patrick has moved away, and he's taunted by skinheads every afternoon on the walk back from school.Omri has won a writing contest with a story called "The Plastic Indian", and when Patrick comes back to the city for a few days, they decide to bring Little Bear & co [...]

    7. Book Review of Return of the Indian- by Lynne Reid Banks "Return of the Indian" is the second book of four in the classic series of "The Indian in the Cupboard." The series narrates different tales of a child's toys coming to life, similar to the Disney movie "A Toy Story." Main character Omri in "Return of the Indian" controls the fate of his toys, obliging him to make many adult decisions throughout the novel. It’s not always fun and games for Omri when the toys don't want to get along with [...]

    8. I like this book a lot because I have a favorite chapter in this book and I will tell you about it. It all started when Omri and Patrick found out how to put themselves in Indian time of Little Bear. They put Omri in the chest and then locked it with the skeleton key and opened the door and Omri was gone. Omri told Patrick to go five minutes, but five minutes passed and Patrick didn't send him back. And Boone the cowboy was sent back in time too. And while he was looking Omri saw a man who had f [...]

    9. In some ways, this sequel is even better than the first book. Omri is a year older, so he's dealing with more mature issues, specifically some skinhead bullies in his new neighborhood. Similarly, Patrick, who spends part of the book denying that the events of the first ever happened, also represents this oncoming maturity. The boys are nearing the end of childhood. The first few chapters are entirely non-magical. Omri has won a writing contest for the story of the Indian. Even though that bit is [...]

    10. Where the first Indian book was about the magic of childhood and the importance of understanding others, this book takes a bit of a darker turn. Onri brings Little Bear back to tell him a bit of news, only to find that the Iroquois village has been destroyed by the French and his friend nearly killed. Reluctantly, Onri agrees to supply Little Bear with weapons to strike back against the French, but comes to realize that he isn't necessarily supporting the "good" side. Just_A_ side.There's a bit [...]

    11. I am reading these aloud to my 8 yo daughter. She is really enjoying them & I recommend them. One caution: the second book is less light-hearted than the first. Boo-hoo Boone is still often funny and the idea of tiny beings drinking from toothpaste tops and doing other mini things is still fun, especially I think for kids who play pretend like that with their figures, but Omri, through, his little people, faces death and loss, and the heavy consequences of decisions they make. [SPOILER - - - [...]

    12. In the Indian in the Cupboard #1, Omri gets a magic cupboard but nobody knows it's magic until Omri puts a toy Indian inside and he comes to life. Now, in The Return of the Indian, Omri brings back the Indian. His name is Little Bear. When he brings him and his wife back, Omri notices that Little Bear was shot in a war because there is a war going on where Little Bear is coming from. Omri makes a nurse real with the cupboard to fix Little Bear. When Little Bear is all healed he wants to go back [...]

    13. In this sequel to "The Indian in the Cupbard", Omri brings Little Bull back to life after a year in order to share with him that he has won first prize in a writing contest. His entry was based on his adventures with Little Bull. Things become more complicated when Little Bull comes back injured and unresponsive and with two bullets in his back after his village was attacked by the Algonquins. Omri and his friend Patrick help to save Little Bull but then contribute to disastrous consequences whe [...]

    14. I liked it. They bring back Little Bear and Boone cause Patrick came on a vacation from his new house. They lose the key and Little Bear got really hurt and they couldn't get anybody to help him and they needed to save Little Bear. My favorite part was burglars were coming to their house and he shot the burglars with teeny guns and it was really funny.

    15. Después de haber terminado el primero de los libros de este volumen, La llave mágica, tengo una opinión encontrada al respecto: por una parte, enseña al público joven nociones históricas y también morales, como en la página 131, cuando Omri le dice a Patrick, sobre los hombrecitos de plástico vivientes: «Tú los utilizas. Pero son personas. Y a las personas no se las utiliza». Por otro lado, incluye comentarios e ideas sexistas, como cuando Toro Pequeño llama a Omri «mujer» por hab [...]

    16. Oh my goodness! I am not sure that I can properly wrap this up quickly! I absolutely LOVED this book! I will be sharing this one with my boys as we move back into our nighttime reading before bed.Omri has brought his friend Little Bear back in his magic cupboard, and it seems it was just in time! Little Bear was injured in the fighting that was raging in his village. But the adventures are just starting there. As the adventure moves on, the boys attempt to help their friend protect his village. [...]

    17. The continued references to Native Americans as "savages" is starting to irk me a bit, but the story continued beautifully. We got to see Omri's growth as a person, and it's easy to see why Patrick might lose his faith in the experience he'd had in the first book. I'm looking forward to reading the last 3 stories in this series. I DO hope that the image of Native Americans as "savages" is finally addressed and done away with.

    18. This is a delightful continuation on the adventures related in Indian in the cupboard. Banks begins to explore more in depth how the cupboard, key, and time travel work. This is kind of where the story breaks down for me. The mechanics of the whole process are poorly explained and don't seem to have a definitive logic. However, it is a kids book. I don't remember this being a problem when I first read it at age 8.

    19. We enjoyed the second adventure of Omni, Patrick, Little Bear, and Boone as much as their first. Once again, the imaginative premise provides a setting from which to explore differences and similarities between people from varied backgrounds. It took a little while to set the stage and launch into the action, but the second half of the book flew by.

    20. My children were enthralled with this sequel to the Indian in the Cupboard. I did not find that it had the same magic or charm as the first book, but I also grew up reading it, so it may have more of an emotional attachment. Asher and Judah loved every minute of it, and begged for ''one more chapter'' every night.

    21. We loved this book! Reading to our sons, ages 8 and 6, the four of us could not wait to read a chapter or two every night before bed. Despite what other reviewers have said, the language was not a problem for us. We enjoyed this book better than the first - it seems to have more excitement and action than the first. We will keep reading books in the series.

    22. I adore these books. It makes me sad that these probably won't be on any sort of summer reading list for kids because they aren't exactly "politically correct" and people can get offended by just about anything these days. But these books are so clever, so magical, and so fun. I can't wait to read them to my kids.

    23. Wonderful second installment! While initially I took issue with Omri abandoning his thoughtful nature and bringing whatever crew he needed to life in order to fight the skin heads, I realize now that it is a great sub-plot which helps to illustrate how he would go along with the "now-guns" plan as as he is able to empathize so easily with Little Bear and his plight.

    24. What started out as a cute imaginative story in book one took a darker turn in this book made me nervous and stressed out because it became more "real." It's not really a lighthearted kid's story.

    25. This series was brilliant! Some part of me still has nightmares about being turned into a teepee and then being burned alive.

    26. I didn't like this one as much as the first. The whole thing with Omri and Patrick traveling back in time was a bit much.

    27. Not as fresh and fun (to me) as the first one, but had some bright moments and one very sad one. Strange blend of tone and genre.

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