In the Country of the Blind: A Novel

In the Country of the Blind A Novel A NEW YORK TIMES EDITOR S CHOICESixty years after the publication of his first novel Cat Man Edward Hogland is publishing his twenty fifth book at the age of eighty three This capstone novel set in

  • Title: In the Country of the Blind: A Novel
  • Author: Edward Hoagland
  • ISBN: 9781628727210
  • Page: 465
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A NEW YORK TIMES EDITOR S CHOICESixty years after the publication of his first novel, Cat Man, Edward Hogland is publishing his twenty fifth book at the age of eighty three This capstone novel, set in Vermont s Northeast Kingdom, introduces Press, a stockbroker going blind Press has lost his job and his wife and is trying to figure out his next move, holed up in his VermA NEW YORK TIMES EDITOR S CHOICESixty years after the publication of his first novel, Cat Man, Edward Hogland is publishing his twenty fifth book at the age of eighty three This capstone novel, set in Vermont s Northeast Kingdom, introduces Press, a stockbroker going blind Press has lost his job and his wife and is trying to figure out his next move, holed up in his Vermont cabin surrounded by a hippy commune, drug runners, farmers gone bust, blood thirsty auctioneers, and general ne er do wells Solace and purpose come from the unlikeliest sources as he learns to navigate his new landscape without sight Hoagland, himself, is going blind, and through this evocative, unsentimental novel, we experience the world closing in around Press, the rising panic of uncertainty, the isolation of exile, the increasing dependence upon the kindness of strangers, and a whole new appreciation of the world just beyond sight.Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade, Yucca, and Good Books imprints, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in fiction novels, novellas, political and medical thrillers, comedy, satire, historical fiction, romance, erotic and love stories, mystery, classic literature, folklore and mythology, literary classics including Shakespeare, Dumas, Wilde, Cather, and much While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

    One thought on “In the Country of the Blind: A Novel”

    1. I requested an ARC of this book because of the description - Set in the 60's, Press, a 47 year old former wall-street trader, has a degenerative eye condition that is causing him to go blind. Because of that, he's lost his job, his wife doesn't want to take care of him so his marriage ends and he has to live away from his kids. He moves to a modest cabin in northern Vermont, next to a hippie commune. He lives a very quiet life there.My grandfather lost his sight in a tragic accident as a young m [...]

    2. Just not my kind of novel. The best think I can say was the Vermont commune and countryside in the late 60s was an interesting setting, drawn well. The premise of a legally blind man making his way alone should have been so interesting but the plot went no where and I didn't like the characters.

    3. In the Country of the Blind tells the story of Press, a man who has lost a lot. He lost his sight to a degenerative disease, and his losses accumulated, his job, then his wife and children as she tossed him out, fearful of care taking. Fortunately, his Vermont neighbors are friendly and oriented toward care taking. He has two sets of neighbors whom he visits, who feed him, take him to church, and welcome him into their hearts.Even better, on a walk in the woods, he meets Carol. She lives at a ne [...]

    4. In the Country of the Blind, a 2016 short novel by Edward Hoagland, takes the reader inside the head of Press, a middle aged ex-stock broker going blind in post Vietnam era America. When his wife leaves him due to the onset of blindness he moves to their cabin in Vermont. He is adrift dealing with his new life with his new disability and his new community. Hoagland's descriptions of how Press experiences his world are exquisite. There's a reason why writers like John Updike and Annie Proulx are [...]

    5. This is the first Hoagland novel I've read, knowing him mostly through his multiple travel books. i e was attracted by the setting, near my home, in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont, having lost the great chronicler of this area, Howard Frank Mosher this past year. I wanted to see if this man, who had won Mosher's praise, could open the door of the Kingdom further. Hoagland sets the stage as Press, a refugee from Wall Street, who is going blind, enters the world of the ordinary world of the 10 M [...]

    6. Why? Spoiler alert. No real plot, no satisfactory end. Stockbroker becomes blind. Wife leaves him. He moves from Connecticut to upstate Vermont. Depends upon the kindness of strangers in the small town. Starts to hang out with hippies from the local commune, angling for sex and connections. Worries about drug running through his property. Listen to bird calls. . Goes back to Connecticut to connect with children. Decides on the spur of moment to drive South - with a stranger from commune. Car cra [...]

    7. fiction 11/2016. Interesting how aging in some ways frees us from planning forward.e need to plot, plan years in the future. Not exactly a 'bucket list' approach, how to take the next steptake a chance. How loved ones perceive choices at caregiving, flight from the loss enjoyment .I'm not becoming blind, but loss of mobility touches my life in similar ways. I enjoyed Hoagland's writing style.

    8. One of the most masterful writings for an age.Hoagland writes what he knows about - going blind in a sighted world.I was given a digital copy of this book by the publisher Skyhorse Publishing via Netgalley in return for an honest unbiased review.

    9. Contemporary fiction group- maybe i should be looking deeper at the story that this was the story of a divorced man trying to find his way into a future that is different from his earlier life experiences but it's just not worth it. I didn't connect with any of the characters or their situations

    10. This is one of those stories where I have not decided whether I like the main character or not. As far as the author goes, he kept me very engaged with a beautifully crafted tale.

    11. I received an ARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalleyas always, a tl;dr is at the endA whole-book pun: a blind man unable to see what he's doing wrongA Vermont-based author going blind writing about a Vermont-based man going blind, should we even pretend like this isn't Hoagland's meditation on life and the current state of it? Because this, while an okay novel, felt much more interesting as a look into Edward's mind.The main character, Press, came off as foolish, intentionally or not [...]

    12. In the Country of the Blind by Edward Hoagland is a so-so novel set in the 1960's.At 47, Press is losing his sight. Due to his loss of sight, he has already lost his job as a stockbroker and his wife, who doesn't want to care for him. He moves to a cabin in Vermont, near a couple helpful neighbors, a hippy commune, and, apparently, drug runners, while he, rather aimlessly, tries to figure out how to live the rest of his life. Carol, an artist and hippy who lives nearby takes an interest in Press [...]

    13. Press is a successful stockbroker in his 40s until a degenerative eye disease robs him of his sight – and his job and wife. He retreats to a remote cabin in Vermont where he meets a whole series of random characters – from hippies to drug dealers to kind neighbours – and a whole series of random events happen to and around him. He tries to maintain contact with his children. He becomes close to one of the free-spirited women associated with the local commune. He drifts along. And that’s [...]

    14. Clunky read, lacks a solid plot, boring overall. Supposedly this author has written 25 books. This is the first one I read by him and likely to be the last.

    15. Quick read about a divorced man coming to grips with the many changes in his life, none the least of which, his going blind. Set in the northeast, during the 60s, there's veterans, hippies and drifters aplenty who are featured as they come in and out of the main character's up-ended life.The prose was a bit clunky. The dialogue was natural if not a bit on the nose. The transitions within scenes were uneven and I found myself re-reading sentences to understand what I just missed. Not sure if this [...]

    16. I was disappointed by this- the blurb was much better than the actual book. Sad to say but it didn't arouse any sympathy in me only brought out my practical pragmatic side. It almost seemed self indulgent. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. Am sure Hoagland fans will enjoy this but it wasn't for me.

    17. Something tells me Hoagland experienced way more jollies writing this book than most of his readers will experience reading this book. The colorful 60s.

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