The Quiet Death of Thomas Quaid

The Quiet Death of Thomas Quaid Lennox liked Quiet Tommy Quaid Perhaps it s odd for a private detective to like even admire a career thief but Quiet Tommy Quaid was the sort of man everyone liked Amiable easy going well dressed

  • Title: The Quiet Death of Thomas Quaid
  • Author: Craig Russell
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 157
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Lennox liked Quiet Tommy Quaid Perhaps it s odd for a private detective to like even admire a career thief, but Quiet Tommy Quaid was the sort of man everyone liked Amiable, easy going, well dressed, with no vices to speak of well, aside from his excessive drinking and womanising, but then in 1950s Glasgow those are practically virtues And besides, throughout hisLennox liked Quiet Tommy Quaid Perhaps it s odd for a private detective to like even admire a career thief, but Quiet Tommy Quaid was the sort of man everyone liked Amiable, easy going, well dressed, with no vices to speak of well, aside from his excessive drinking and womanising, but then in 1950s Glasgow those are practically virtues And besides, throughout his many exploits outside the law, Quiet Tommy never once used violence It was rumoured to be the police who gave him his nickname because whenever they caught him, which was not often, he always came quietly So probably even the police liked him, deep down.Above all, the reason people liked Tommy was that he you knew exactly what you were dealing with Here, everybody realized, was someone who was exactly, simply and totally who and what he seemed to be.But when Tommy turns up dead, Lennox and the rest of Glasgow will find out just how wrong they were.

    One thought on “The Quiet Death of Thomas Quaid”

    1. The award winning Craig Russell continues his atmospheric period 1950s Glasgow series with the private enquiry agent, Lennox. This is a high calibre, superbly crafted, complex and intelligent crime story that you would expect from Russell. Lennox and Quaid are sharp dressed friends who go way back. Quaid is a well known thief and master cat burglar, he is popular and well liked, even by the police. His good humour and character suggests that he is an open book. Not so, as we are to discover.Lenn [...]

    2. Very stylish - I had forgotten how well the Lennox series blends hard-boiled Marlowesque prose with the more favourite of mine Scottish noir. The plot here is excellent (investigating the death of the titular associate of Lennox, and the complex reasons behind it) but more impressive is Russell's talent for describing the post-WWII Glasgow setting and the varied characters inhabiting this dark place, and doing so with wit and colour.One of the most notable aspects is how Russell avoids one of my [...]

    3. A worthy addition to Craig Russell's series of books about Glasgow private inquiry agent Lennox. Set in the 1950's, the book opens with Lennox being hired by a mystery man named McNaught to burgle a city foundry, better known for its production of cast iron fountains and steal a set of plans. McNaught doesn't give details of these plans, but Lennox accepts the job and engages an old friend , "Quiet" Tommy Quaid - a master cat burglar - who expresses some concern at the reason behind the proposed [...]

    4. I would like to thank Netgalley and Quercus for an advance copy of The Quiet Death Of Thomas Quaid, the fifth outing in late 1950s Glasgow for enquiry agent Lennox.Lennox is an enquiry agent (we would call him a private detective) with a rather elastic view of the law. He is trying to go straight but when he is offered funny money to break into a foundry and steal some plans he can't refuse. He enlists the help of Quiet Thomas Quaid, cat burglar extraordinaire, to carry it out. They both have mi [...]

    5. I have not read any of the previous 4 in the Lennox series & I honestly believe that this made no difference whatsoever to my enjoyment of this book. There were so many twists and turns in the plot that my head was spinning. Lennox is a very likeable lead character and the writers description of 1950s Glasgow was very informative. Will now be looking out for the previous in series & any after this one

    6. If I thought once, reading this, "This feels like the end but cannot be because there's too many pages left" I thought it more than half a dozen times. Intricate, twisty, well-charactered and perfectly executed, this had a high but frequently well-deserved body count. And Lennox continues to grow in stature.

    7. Hard to review without spoiling the surprises - but in general terms another carefully observed and authentic slice of post-war Glasgow gangland, with a few of the sardonic asides that we've come to associate with Lennox. For once, he isn't operating totally alone, he's able to call on some of his contacts for a good cause, and I enjoyed meeting some of his friends again. It's a satisfying read because although he can't undo the harm that was done, he's able to wreak a bit of havoc in his own co [...]

    8. Set in 1950’s Glasgow this is a very atmospheric and funny novel with a great detective story. Tommy Quaid dies whilst undertaking a task for his friend Lennox, who as a private detective was already suspicious of the client, certain his death is not the tragic accident that the police think. Digging further into “Quiet Tommy’s” death he starts to uncover connections that leads him into trouble and using his network in the police and the criminal underworld he is determined to track down [...]

    9. "Another fantastic Lennox Story in Wartime Glasgow"Craig Russell`s storylines and Sean Barrett`s narration were made for each other.Set in the Glasgow that my grandparents grew up in The Quiet Death of Thomas Quade is a another compelling Glasgow Noir Novel. Its gritty and that includes the fog, love interests and police. But its more than that the characterisation and the brilliant narration put you right inside the heads of a very troubled generation who were coping with the aftermath of the w [...]

    10. Another thoroughly enjoyable journey through the darker side of 1950s Glasgow, courtesy of Lennox. An engaging story, told with great writing and strong dialogue, with several moments of humour - both dark and light. Highly recommended reading, for both previous readers and new initiates! Craig Russell's Lennox could almost be a Scottish-based relative of Raymond Chandler's Marlowe!

    11. I love the Lennox series and the Glasgow setting. Once I started, I could not put this book down.It grips you and pulls you in from the start. Great characters and another fantastic plot from Craig Russell. Thank you net galley for my copy.

    12. The Quiet Death of Thomas Quaid is the fifth book in the Lennox series. The story begins one Friday the eleventh of July, nineteen fifty-eight in Glasgow. A year before, Lennox, a former Canadian officer who had settled in Glasgow at the end of the World War II, had hired Archie McClelland, a former Glasgow policeman to help him in the business. Archie had helped Lennox to stay on the straight and narrow and for what he had done, the sign on the door now says Lennox and McClelland, Enquiry Agent [...]

    13. A PI in the 50s surrounded by gangsters and dodgy cops gets mixed up in something a lot bigger than him - and it turns out to be very, very dangerous(Well it's not The Maltese Falcon, but it's fairly close - and I guess it's hard to avoid sounding a little cliché, when writing about a setting that's been done to death and then parodied for decades)Actually it's a rather complicated and clever plot, and nicely executed - even if it was a bit longwinding in places, and I really don't care about n [...]

    14. I have read a number of run of the mill crime novels lately, so it is a real pleasure to return to one of my favourite authors. The plot moves along at a cracking pace, although actually I found the ending slightly disappointing - it was just a little pat. The real pleasure though is in the writing style, crisp dialogue and evoking a real atmosphere of 1950s Glasgow still getting back normal after the war.I hope we get more of Lennox soon.

    15. I was lucky to receive an advance copy and this is the best yet. A good story, with plenty of dark humour, mixed with observations on Scotland at the time. Every book has improved from the last and I'm already looking forward to the next (I hope)

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