The Moneylender of Toulouse

The Moneylender of Toulouse In A D Theophilos jester and agent for the Fools Guild is sent to Toulouse with his jester wife infant daughter and young apprentice with one simple mission get the current Bishop to quietly r

  • Title: The Moneylender of Toulouse
  • Author: Alan Gordon
  • ISBN: 9780312371098
  • Page: 342
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In 1204 A.D Theophilos, jester and agent for the Fools Guild, is sent to Toulouse with his jester wife, infant daughter and young apprentice with one simple mission get the current Bishop to quietly retire so that the position can be filled with one sympathetic to the Guild s goals Arriving just before Christmas, they quickly learn that the Bishop is in some hotIn 1204 A.D Theophilos, jester and agent for the Fools Guild, is sent to Toulouse with his jester wife, infant daughter and young apprentice with one simple mission get the current Bishop to quietly retire so that the position can be filled with one sympathetic to the Guild s goals Arriving just before Christmas, they quickly learn that the Bishop is in some hot water with a man widely known as the local money lender A man who, a day after pressing the Bishop particularly hard, is found floating face down in a tanner s vat Now, with time running out for him to accomplish their mission and thus protect the Guild, Theophilos has but one option left find out what actually happened the night that the Moneylender of Toulouse ended up so spectacularly dead.

    One thought on “The Moneylender of Toulouse”

    1. I just cannot praise this wonderful mystery series enough! Usually, when I find a series where I absolutely love the main character and their family/friends, there's a lack somewhere else--the writing is clunky or the plot wanders or the grammar is horrible or somethingis series shines on all fronts, and add to that list a sense of immersion in the time and place (Toulouse, France in 1204) and sneaky history lessons--because I always learn something interesting from the series, even though it do [...]

    2. If this is my least favorite book in this whole series, and if the reason why this is my least favorite stays the same, then boy am I lucky. The only reason I didn't like this one as much was that the characters in it, I was already familiar with. Not Helga, Portia, Claudia, or Theo, but the secondary characters, such as Pelardit and the Count. I already knew these characters and who they were, so setting up their role in the next book was a bit annoying for me. If I read this one before the eig [...]

    3. Great mystery writer who's half comedian and half historian. The series is all about a jester in the 1200s whose guild runs top-secret spy missions in the name of peace. That's right, it's 007 in tights.

    4. Worth reading all of this series. Well developed characters, a solid historic backdrop, and entertaining dialog. What's not to like?

    5. This is about the 6th in the jester series by Alan Gordon, and one of the best. In this novel, Theophilus and Claudia are dispatched to Toulouse to depose the local bishop, who has been antithetical to the Fools' Guild. On arrival they find the bishop in a verbal altercation with a local moneylender. The following morning the moneylender is found murdered, face down in a tanner's pit with a hole in his skull.Theophilus is drawn into the murder investigation by the bishop's assistant, and soon fi [...]

    6. I am just starting this book, but I know I will love it!Though I'm not a huge fan of "historical" fiction as a rule, Alan's books take me happily back to medieval times, when the "fools" (aka jesters) did more than just entertain royalty; they had a tight, secret system of obtaining and transferring information about the politics of the times - hoping to keep their world on an even keel, as much as possible.Alan's descriptions of the peoples, places, lives, loves (and hardships) make that world [...]

    7. Nothing revolutionary, but again I am impressed by the way that Gordon makes such relatively short novels feel so packed with twists and turns. Here he makes the city of Toulouse as well as its inhabitants come alive as we see Theophilos and his family arrive in town with the goal of deposing the current Bishop in order to replace him with one more sympathetic to their cause.Murder, conspiracy, wordplay, intrigue, foolishness.Good stuff, very well written.

    8. Although the actual mystery was only so so, the characters, setting and humor were great and I plan to go back and read more of this series. The book is set in early 1200s. Jesters or fools belong to a secret society which tries to keep peace in Christiandom. The main character is funny and irreverent. He and his wife interact like Nick and Nora, but with "Nora" being let in on the goings on.

    9. Theophilos and his wife Claudia arrive in Toulouse to help change the bishopric to Folc, a monk and former fool. There are two murders, and a book must be found. In the middle of all this, Theophilos has become chief fool of Toulouse and how he makes the established fools accept him is important. This is a marvelous historical mystery set in 1205. The story picks up from where the previous book finishes. The puns between characters are great. I highly recommend this series.

    10. I confess I loved this book (as I have ALL of Alan's to date) and finished it, like, the day after my posting. (Sorry, Alan!) Misplaced my password and totally forgot.The next book in this delightful (and educational!) series, The Parisian Prodigal (2010), was equally intriguing, funny, smart and poignant. I'd surely love another Fools' Guild mystery! :)

    11. Gordon's characters are very likable, and he places them in historical settings that interest me. While his novels are touted as being historically accurate, there are quite a few anachronisms. This was the fourth book I read in his series, which shows that they have kept me entertained. They don't need to be read in sequence because he retells pertinent history.

    12. This was an entertaining book that I realized was the most recent in a series. I think I'll try to go back to the beginning and see if I appreciate this one more. The ending felt a little thrown together to me, but, then, I don't read many mysteries. I did enjoy the plot of jesters being secret agents.

    13. This book was a lot of fun to read (and I needed a fun book after the last couple of books I read.) It's not much of a mystery but the dialogue is very clever. It's part of a series and I want to read more of them.

    14. A great, quick read. Clever, down-to-earth characters, fascinating historical details that don't feel inserted by the author for their own sake, and a suspenseful plot. I will seek out the other "Fools' Guild" books!

    15. What the others said. Good fun, if you ignore the dialogue that's a thousand years out of place (and you should!). Nice integration of some real history. I'll definitely read the rest of the series now.

    16. God bless whoever left this in the Hotel Chania - this book kept me from going crazy with boredom during a vacation. Quickly paced, smart, and I even learned some things I didn't know about the medieval/renaissance world. Good stuff all around.

    17. This is a fun piece of alternative history. I expect I'll read the rest of the series. Starting in the middle wasn't intentional, but I think it won't hurt.

    18. My entry into this series. Amusing and entertaining. Dry humor, fun character interactions. I'll come back for more.

    19. Oh man, makes me want to reread the history of Provence and the whole dual popes controversy. Fascinating writer with a very intriguing story.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *