The Bestseller Code: Anatomy of a Blockbuster Novel

The Bestseller Code Anatomy of a Blockbuster Novel Ask most people about massive success in the world of fiction and you ll typically hear that it s a game of hazy crystals balls The sales figures of E L James or Dan Brown seem to be freakish random

The Bestseller Code Anatomy of the Blockbuster Novel The Bestseller Code Anatomy of the Blockbuster Novel Jodie Archer, Matthew L Jockers on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Non formulaic, eye opening, deeply researched and really worth your time GQ Jodie Archer and Matthew L Jockers The Bestseller Code Anatomy of the Blockbuster Novel is a big idea book that explains their text mining research Free Download Dan Brown s Bestseller, The DaVinci Code I ll be the first one to admit it, The DaVinci Code isn t exactly an easy fit on a site that promises to talk about the best cultural media out there But Dan Brown s mystery novel has sold north of million copies and now finds itself translated into languages. The Confidence Code, By Katty Kay and Claire Shipman The Confidence Code for Girls It s a paradox familiar to parents everywhere girls are achieving like never before, yet they re consumed with doubt on the inside. Norton Security Deluxe Device Download Note Product accesses is updated constantly, as it is a subscription product Norton Security Deluxe secures up to PCs, Macs, iOS Android devices Instantly download and receive your activation code to be protected in minutes The New York Times Best Sellers Authoritatively ranked lists of books sold in the United States, sorted by format and genre This copy is for your personal, noncommercial use only. New York Times Adult Hardcover Best Seller Hawes New York Times Adult Hardcover Best Seller Number Ones Listing Fiction By Title This page is an alphabetical listing by title of adult fiction books which have made number one on the New York Times Best Seller List along with the date that they first reached number one. Inferno Dan Brown INFERNO In his international blockbusters The Da Vinci Code, Angels Demons, and The Lost Symbol, Dan Brown masterfully fused history, art, codes, and symbols.In this riveting new thriller, Brown returns to his element and has crafted his highest stakes novel to date. s Book Store Welcome to the Book Store featuring critically acclaimed books, new releases, recommendations from our editorial team and the best deals in books Check back regularly to find your next favourite book.

  • Title: The Bestseller Code: Anatomy of a Blockbuster Novel
  • Author: Jodie Archer Matthew L. Jockers
  • ISBN: 9781250088277
  • Page: 265
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Ask most people about massive success in the world of fiction, and you ll typically hear that it s a game of hazy crystals balls The sales figures of E L James or Dan Brown seem to be freakish random occurrences in an unknowable market So often we hear that nothing but hype explains their success, but what if there were an algorithm that could reveal a secret DNA of beAsk most people about massive success in the world of fiction, and you ll typically hear that it s a game of hazy crystals balls The sales figures of E L James or Dan Brown seem to be freakish random occurrences in an unknowable market So often we hear that nothing but hype explains their success, but what if there were an algorithm that could reveal a secret DNA of bestsellers, regardless of their genre What if it knew, just from analyzing the words alone, not just why genre writers like John Grisham and Danielle Steel belong on the lists, but also that authors such as Junot Diaz, Jodi Picoult, and Donna Tartt had tell tale signs of success all over their pages Thanks to Jodie Archer and Matthew Jockers, the algorithm exists, the code has been cracked, and the results bring fresh new insights into how fiction works and why we read The Bestseller Code offers a new theory for why Fifty Shades of Grey sold so well It sheds light on the current craze for dark heroines It reveals which themes tend to sell best And all with fascinating supporting data taken from a five year study of 20,000 novels Then there is the hunt for the one the paradigmatic example of bestselling writing according to a computer s analysis of thousands of points of data The result is surprising, a bit ironic, and delightfully unorthodox.

    One thought on “The Bestseller Code: Anatomy of a Blockbuster Novel”

    1. I honestly thought I would enjoy this book more than I did. Part of the problem might have been the not-so-secret snobbishness I have when it comes to bestselling novels. There's a little voice in my head that tells me that if a book appeals to the masses, it's probably not going to do much for me. And, in most cases, that's true. I don't very often read titles that make the lists, and when I do, it's usually by accident, or if the book has been chosen by my book club. I've never read anything b [...]

    2. Using a computer algorithm, the authors of this book as the question of whether you can predict whether a novel will be a bestseller or not. Jodie Archer is a former publisher and consultant, while Matthew Jockers is the co-founder of Stanford University’s famed Library Lab. In this work they claim they can discover a bestseller and analyse 20.000 novels to demonstrate this.Subtitled, “Anatomy of the Blockbuster Novel,” this book attempts to analyse novels from the points of view of theme, [...]

    3. This book ended up being even more amazing than I expected.The authors are both literary/publishing experts and have worked on machine learning for years. They fed 5,000 books, published over the past 30 years, to their computer programs. 500 of those were NY Times bestsellers and the rest weren't. They had programs that analyzed, for each book, the themes and topics, ups and downs of the plot, characters and the style. They had an in-sample--10% of bestsellers and 10% of non-bestsellers--that w [...]

    4. Very interesting if a bit heavy on the math. If I hit the NYTimes bestsellers list I'll come back and give it the 5th star.

    5. The title of this book has it all for me's the reason I picked it up in the first place. The idea that blockbuster novels all share some elemental DNA in common is at once exciting and dangerous.I found that the authors of this book set out to prove their algorithm without giving away too many of the intricate details (likely proprietary information) and for the most part made their case in a concise and believable manner.For the most part.I honestly would've liked to have seen more actual numbe [...]

    6. "Recommending a book is not like recommending a health tip or a stock. Recommending a book can be like trying to navigate the unspoken rules and faux pas of a Jane Austen ballroom. The book world comes with considerable baggage."Who can explain what makes for a best-selling book? What techniques do best-selling authors employ that makes their works so desirable compared with the majority of authors who struggle for readership? Do those who write literary classics differ so much from those who ap [...]

    7. There's an observation that sometimes goes around about how you only need to read the fourth chapter of any given business book. The first is an introduction, the second is about how everything you thought you knew about the subject was wrong, the third is the miraculous tale of how the authors came up with this new secret answer, and the fourth is the actual content. After that it goes into testimonial-style case studies and other rather dull stuff. So, the fourth chapter, or sometimes I've hea [...]

    8. I remember reading "The Da Vinci Code" (along with everyone else) and finding the chapter-ending cliffhangers so obvious and annoying, yet I couldn't put it down. There is something to be said for the page-turner, and for writers seeking guidance on how to make their books more palatable to readers, there is much to glean here. The ideas, the insights, and the passion still must come from the writer. That can't be computer-generated (not yet anyway), but writers would be wise to keep in mind wha [...]

    9. I found this book fascinating reading. The authors wrote a computer programme which could read and analyse books and this is the result. They wanted to see if a computer could predict which books would be best sellers and which wouldn't, A lot of the time it got things right but with some books it was completely wrong - stating that a book was unlikely to be a best seller when it was actually a blockbuster. I thought it was interesting that a computer could tell whether it was a man or a woman w [...]

    10. Did they get high and write this?Jesus. This could've been so much better. They had all of this great data and then just dragged the fuck out of every chapter. . d when the actual date was presented. . was fast and in clumps of undecipherable paragraphs.Great Discoveries. Horrific Presentation. And suck ass drag-on writing.

    11. Kniha, která by neměla uniknout žádnému opravdovému knihomolovi. Mimo jiné se v ní dozvíte, že bestsellery toho řeknou hodně o naší společnosti nebo že autor musí čtenáře vtáhnout do děje během prvních čtyřiceti stran (víc času, aby čtenáře zahřál u srdce nebo jim způsobil mrazení či husí kůži, nemá). Pochopíte, že není třeba psát věty, k jejichž hlasitému přečtení by čtenář potřeboval lékaře, který by mu přikládal kyslíkovou masku — [...]

    12. Despite all the efforts of publishers, it has always seemed impossible to predict whether or not a book would be runaway bestseller. This isn't too surprising - it's the kind of thing that is inherently unpredictable because there are simply so many variables involved. Yet a newly published book suggests it is possible to do just that. Are the authors crazed or brilliant? Neither, really. They have put together a mechanism based on computerised text analysis that is good at spotting bestsellers [...]

    13. I found the insights quite fascinating. More from an interest point of view, than from an author's point of view. Mind you some of their conclusions can easily be incorporated into your writing - type of pet your fictional family should own, where they live etc.Like any piece of writing advice, read it, and take away from it what you think you can use. Its all knowledge, some is more useful than others. I think this would be a useful read for a new author.

    14. When you’re in the middle of devouring Nora Roberts’ latest love story, or admiring the crazy cunning of Amy Dunne in “Gone Girl”, do you ever stop to think, “Gah, why is this book SO GOOD?”I do, all the time. My theories are vague, and in the past I’ve left it as: the process of writing is a mystery to the masses and an alchemical process for the writer, and no one will ever know what makes a best-seller a best-seller. I enjoy the vagueness. It feels romantic and rebellious in an [...]

    15. The upcoming book The Bestseller Code is getting a great deal of buzz, forcing many of us to ask the question, Can one genuinely predict what kind of book will become a New York Times bestseller (typically considered the most prestigious bestseller list)?The promise of a formula for predicting a bestseller is getting many in the publishing industry and those who write about books excited, or at least curious. Several journalists contacted me for an opinion about the book because of my background [...]

    16. Ignore all the reviews by novelists sucking up to the authors of this for professional reasons, and what do you have? A bad book with little to reveal.The old publishing industry, no doubt shamed by the finally accurate raw data lets anyone see and Author Earnings's incisive analysis of it, is finally trying to do smart analysis after years of guessing very badly. However, here, they largely failed. Their data points were, if you'll excuse the term, squishy for the most part, had to be interpre [...]

    17. Interesting analysis of bestsellers. The authors use textual analysis and machine learning to identify features that differentiate bestsellers from non-bestsellers with greater confidence. For example, bestsellers have a few topics (2-3) that make up 40% of the book. The book also identifies 7 types of plot lines that all bestsellers in their corpus (in the thousands) tend to fall into. The use of sentiment analysis to arrive at this conclusion is very clever! Similar their analysis of the recen [...]

    18. The Bestseller Code alternates between pop nonfiction and an academic treatise, which makes sense given the book has co-authors, one a writer and the other a college professor. As a result, my reading experience alternated between enjoying the big ideas and tolerating the science (where admittedly I skimmed the surface). I have no problem with science, but here it seemed a bit dry and well, too academic. The Bestseller Code had me thinking about writing so I returned to Elmore Leonard's 10 Rules [...]

    19. I found this book fascinating but I would have liked twice as much detail and information! I gobbled it up in two nights and came out wanting more. The book involves a lot of literary essay, using the numbers from this algorithm of theirs to back it up. I liked it a lot, but I want more details! More numbers! It's really interesting and I feel like they gave us only a quick peek beneath the surface.

    20. Jodie Archer und Matthew L. Jockers haben computerbasiert, aus rein linguistischer Sicht Stil, Figuren und Handlungsverlauf von Bestsellern der New-York-Times-Bestsellerliste analysiert. Da das Etikett NYT-Bestseller bisher mit großer Treffsicherheit Bücher markierte, die mich beim Lesen enttäuschten, schlug ich den Buchdeckel mit seinem reißerischen Titel mit sehr gemischten Gefühlen auf. Im ersten Kapitel signalisierte mir die Sprache, die ich in der deutschen Übersetzung für das Thema [...]

    21. My friend who, like me, is a writer, bought this book for me because we all want to know, don't we, what the 'secret' of the bestseller is. What this book reveals, through the impressive work done by its authors (and there is much discussion of their methodology, which does get rather repetitive but I suppose is necessary in the interests of transparency), is rather surprising. Apparently the topics we readers most want to find when we open a book is work, human closeness, and kids in schools. N [...]

    22. Some books I read and feverishly take pictures of certain pages, in fear of forgetting some valuable wisdoms. This book I think I photographed a gazillion times (took pics of a gazillion pages, I mean). It confirmed what I've been reading over the last five years in the books on the craft of writing, only this time seen through the eyes of the computer that has analyzed bestsellers and extracted data on what sells and what doesn't and why. A good read to refresh your striving for excellence and, [...]

    23. You can’t argue with statistics. Ask a computer to crunch some numbers and it never gets them wrong which is why the application of computer science to that most subjective of considerations, what makes a best-selling novel, is so intriguing. It intrigued two busy brains at Stanford University for seven years and their conclusions in The Bestseller Code are going to be required reading for the book trade, writers, aspiring writers and anyone else who loves books. Of course, a computer can only [...]

    24. You can’t argue with statistics. Ask a computer to crunch some numbers and it never gets them wrong which is why the application of computer science to that most subjective of considerations, what makes a best-selling novel, is so intriguing. It intrigued two busy brains at Stanford University for seven years and their conclusions in The Bestseller Code are going to be required reading for the book trade, writers, aspiring writers and anyone else who loves books. Of course, a computer can only [...]

    25. More than anything I gave this 5 stars for the scope of the project Archer and Jockers undertook to create the The Bestseller Code. The incredible undertaking has yielded an insightful and entertaining book for fans of non-fiction and certainly authors as well. Beyond describing the groundwork for how they developed their system, the authors also provide a number of specific rankings based on different criteria. And who doesn't love a good book list! (view spoiler)[ They inspired me to finally g [...]

    26. I was lucky enough to read this book prior to its publication.For all aspiring authors it is a must, for all those people with an interest in what makes a best seller or in other words a book we will enjoy reading it is truly fascinating and beautifully written.It opens up a world of new yet somehow obvious ideas and explanations as to why some books just work and others do not.To a layman like myself with only the basic understanding of algorithm's It is made simple with the use of graphs, I fo [...]

    27. This was an interesting buddy read with peeps at . The authors discuss their development of an algorithm that can predict commercial success for works of fiction. There really should be algorithms for everything the entertainment industry would benefit from machine learning for certain. Much of what the authors discovered was not mind-blowing: readers like a fast-moving plot, prefer books with a limited scope of topics and enjoy strong main characters - but there were some interesting gems that [...]

    28. An interesting read.It's a shame that big parts of it were dull. It could've been written using half the word-count.

    29. This is a fascinating look at the fabric of a bestseller. While all writers are told to read the bestsellers and look for patterns of why the books work, these authors actually had computers analyze thousands of non-bestsellers and bestsellers for thousands of factors and saw the actual patterns of what made something more or less likely to be a bestseller. If you've ever wondered why Fifty Shades of Grey was such a hit--this book explains it and it's not simply because it was mommy porn. I real [...]

    30. Some interesting insights about what makes a novel bestselling and it gave me some food for thought about my current MS. Readers like everyday language, journalists/copywriters are being disproportionately represented on the blockbuster lists because they have mastered the art of writing to appeal to a large audience, the success of the 'girl' titles is because of female agency, and don't overload your novel with too many topics are just some of the tips I got for this book.Written by a writer a [...]

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