Does Anybody Else Look Like Me?: A Parent's Guide To Raising Multiracial Children

Does Anybody Else Look Like Me A Parent s Guide To Raising Multiracial Children Am I black or white or am I American Why don t my eyes look like yours Why do people always call attention to my different hair Helping a child understand his mixed racial background can be daunting

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  • Title: Does Anybody Else Look Like Me?: A Parent's Guide To Raising Multiracial Children
  • Author: Donna Jackson Nakazawa
  • ISBN: 9780738209500
  • Page: 147
  • Format: Paperback
  • Am I black or white or am I American Why don t my eyes look like yours Why do people always call attention to my different hair Helping a child understand his mixed racial background can be daunting, especially when, whether out of honest appreciation or mean spiritedness, peers and strangers alike perceive their features to be other Drawing on psychological Am I black or white or am I American Why don t my eyes look like yours Why do people always call attention to my different hair Helping a child understand his mixed racial background can be daunting, especially when, whether out of honest appreciation or mean spiritedness, peers and strangers alike perceive their features to be other Drawing on psychological research and input from over fifty multiracial families, Does Anybody Else Look Like Me addresses the special questions and concerns facing these families, explaining how we can best prepare multiracial children of all ages to make their way confidently in our color conscious world From the books and toys to use in play with young children, to advice on guiding older children toward an unflappable sense of self, Does Anybody Else Look Like Me is the first book to outline for parents how, exactly, to deflect the objectifying attention multiracial children receive Full of powerful stories and counsel, it is sure to become the book adoptive and birth parents of different races alike will look to for understanding as they strive to raise their children in a changing world.

    One thought on “Does Anybody Else Look Like Me?: A Parent's Guide To Raising Multiracial Children”

    1. I learned a lot from this book, but as a prospective adoptive parent, I did skip over large sections that seemed to pertain only to families created through parents having multiracial children by birth. For that group, I'm sure it is an even better resource. Much of the book does transfer over to multiracial adoptive families though. Early in the book the author goes through multiple age ranges and how children of those particular ages understand and conceptualize race. This will be helpful as o [...]

    2. I had high hopes for this book, but the suggestions are really obvious and can be summarized as "communicate with your kids." This book also seems very focused on issues that parents face in very homogenous areas. I live in a fairly diverse city, but imagine we will still face issues and was hoping this book would help us prepare for some of them. The topic is a good one, but the content seriously misses the mark.

    3. written by a parent raising Hapa children, so she can honestly appreciate the complexity of such a situation of the few books, that i have found, that approaches the subject in terms of preschoolers. most other books tackle the issue with grade-school ages & up.

    4. This book is mostly a collection of interviews of people from multi-racial background,their experiences in dealing with racism and identity issues. It is roughly organised by age. The book also includes some analysis of American society. I am a little disappointed because I was looking for a practical parental guidebook in the fashion of How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk. Having said that, I still find it an informative book. Here is what I've learned: 1. Parents the [...]

    5. This book is written by a white woman who's married to a Japanese-American man and has two biracial children. She uses some of her own experience raising her children, as well lots of stories and ideas from other parents and children, to talk about what parents can do to raise their multicultural or transracially adopted children to become confident and competent adults. It's a very thoughtfully written book, as well as well-researched, as shown through the personal testimonies that appear all t [...]

    6. I've been reading anything I can get my hands on from my local library about adoption, specifically transracial adoption. This book had some helpful parts which would be applicable to any parent really, such as how to keep a dialog going throughout your kids' childhoods about racism. But a lot of the book deals specifically with multiracial kids who aren't adopted. Many of the same issues and many issues that just aren't the same. All in all, a worthwhile read to skim. Just be forewarned that it [...]

    7. This book was incredibly revealing about the possible future of a multiracial child that we might adopt might have -- the cruel questions in the supermarket as toddlers, the cruel racism of the teenage years, the unforgiving questions of the 5-8 years from peers and teachers. We will be prepared and train ourselves for creating a strong sense of multiracial identity with our child -- like chocolate ice cream and vanilla -- mixed together, but sooooo much more complicated.

    8. I would recommend this book. As the parent of multiracial children, I saw a lot of my familiy's experiences in it.

    9. book jacket description - "The author, a freelance writer, is from a western European background, while her husband is Japanese American. Although Nakazawa initially hoped to raise her son and daughter to be "color blind," they couldn't ignore the many comments made by both adults and children concerning Christian and Claire's appearance. When Christian was a toddler he was asked if he spoke Chinese, and the author was assured that little Claire didn't "even look Asian." Nakazawa decided to deve [...]

    10. Raising multiracial kids to be color-blind will not work says the author. She discusses ways to raise a multiracial child to have positive self-esteem, be appreciative of all their cultures, develop a comfortable self-identity, and be able to deal with people who are ignorant of multiracial issues. The key to successfully raising multiracial kids in a world of social race constructs is developing an ongoing, open dialog about race and culture. The author looks at three key developmental stages: [...]

    11. Poorly edited to the point of distraction. She gives too many qualifiers on people she introduced and utilized throughout the book. I guess the author thinks you can't remember a few names. Sometimes this is helpful if they have not been mentioned for a while but seriously, she gives the same information about an author two pages later. It is too much.The information seems fine but as I read elsewhere, this is a Caucasian mother writing about raising her multiethnic children. Also, it is somewha [...]

    12. A decent book for parents that have experienced growing up in the majority who have a child that may be in the minority. It does touch on struggles that may be specific to multiracial children, but much of the discussion could apply to any minority child. Growing up in Asian in a nearly all white community, I could relate a lot to the anecdotes provided by interviewees. There are some good suggestions on how to deal with inevitable questions from kids and their peers, how to teach your child to [...]

    13. This book is geared to parents of kids who are multi-racial or parents of kids who are transracially adopted, but it is good reading for anyone who is interested in race issues.My only complaint was that the author stresses the importance of family and telling your child "family is forever", but doesn't give advice if one doesn't have a good family setting for the child, which I think is important in this age when divorce is common.

    14. In a world where the once-rigid lines of race are becoming (thankfully) more blurred, Donna does a great job addressing this question. What is it about human nature that desires to fit other in "nice, neat compartments" so we can feel secure about ourselves? This is a book for anyone who does not fit into a nice, neat compartmentd also for anyone who desires to know a multiracial's experience.

    15. I gave up on finishing this book. I got about 1/3 of the way through and realized that it is much more of a resource for biracial/whatever type of mixed race parents and kids than my situation, which IS transracial adoption but neither of my kids are biracial. it has a lot of good insight and I'd recommend it to any who feel they'd benefit from reading it.

    16. Finished the first chapter and am getting a lot out of it. Nicely integrates anecdotes from Nakazawa's interviewees and psychology/ child development research. Makes a good case for why love isn't all you need when raising a multiracial child No discussion of implicit race bias yet.

    17. This is a good book if you are raising a multiracial child. It gives you some things to think about before the awkward situations come. My daughter is only 8 months old, but we've already gotten the questions of "Oh, is she adopted?". "No, she's my daughter. Stop being nosy!".

    18. I found this book to be useful for me from a professional perspective and a parental perspective. Lots of anecdotal information and useful suggestions for parents to promote positive racial/ethnic socialization in their children.

    19. This book was interesting to read from a teachers perspective. Interesting book, but this is definitely written as white parents guide to raising multiracial kids. I read it for a book club and multiracial parents in the group had the same feeling.

    20. Sent to us by our agency while we waited to go get our daughter. Gave some good insight - and zingers - to use on friendly and not so friendly stranger observations of our family.

    21. Practical advice for parents, not just another scholarly look at race and identity. Had to have it for my personal collection.

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