The War of the Spanish Succession 1701 - 1714

The War of the Spanish Succession The War of the Spanish Succession fought between and to decide who should inherit the Spanish throne was a conflict on an unprecedented scale stretching across most of western Europe the

  • Title: The War of the Spanish Succession 1701 - 1714
  • Author: James Falkner
  • ISBN: 9781781590317
  • Page: 328
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The War of the Spanish Succession, fought between 1701 and 1714 to decide who should inherit the Spanish throne, was a conflict on an unprecedented scale, stretching across most of western Europe, the high seas and the Americas Yet this major subject is not well known and is little understood That is why the publication of James Falkner s absorbing new study is so timelyThe War of the Spanish Succession, fought between 1701 and 1714 to decide who should inherit the Spanish throne, was a conflict on an unprecedented scale, stretching across most of western Europe, the high seas and the Americas Yet this major subject is not well known and is little understood That is why the publication of James Falkner s absorbing new study is so timely and important In a clear and perceptive narrative he describes and analyses the complex political manoeuvres and a series of military campaigns which also involved the threat posed by Ottoman Turks in the east and Sweden and Russia in the north Fighting took place not just in Europe but in the Americas and Canada, and on the high seas All European powers, large and small, were involved France, Spain, Great Britain, Holland, Austria and Portugal were the major players The end result of eleven years of outright war was a French prince firmly established on the throne in Madrid and a division of the old Spanish empire More notably though, French power, previously so dominant, was curbed for almost ninety years.

    One thought on “The War of the Spanish Succession 1701 - 1714”

    1. The thirteen years of war in the early 18th has some resemblance to the Napoleonic Wars of a century later. Louis XIV of France wanted to use the throne of Spain as an ally by allowing his grandson to take over when Carlos II died. Unlike Napoleon, who also tried to put a relative on the Spanish throne, Louis XIV managed to achieve that goal, but by 1714 was in a precarious financial position after so many costly battles. His main antagonists were Britain, Holland and the Austrian empire, two of [...]

    2. I'm glad that there is finally a treatment on this conflict which had far reaching consequences in the 18th century and beyond. Though I thoroughly enjoyed it, it pales in comparison in my opinion to John Lynn's chapter on the subject which was actually what I would describe as the climax of his book (The Wars of Louis XIV). Falkner tends to eschew battlefield tactics for personal correspondence which highlights the period but I was surprised that his description of Malplaquet was less than a pa [...]

    3. I was charitable here as there is precious little written on this subject so anything coherent is a welcome addition.The first chapter needs to be re-read as it outlines the causes of the war (the void in the line of Spanish succession) but it seemed to me that the parties (Austria+England+United Provinces vs France) more or less reached agreement but then started the war nonetheless. So, the war starts and goes on, year-after-year, in the Spanish Netherlands, Spain, modern day western Germany, [...]

    4. This subject is rarely written on so this was welcomed. The book is well written.However it is clear that Falkner is biased towards the English cause and his written shows as much, which opinion being voiced of a defeat as being "regrettable" or "unfortunate" when the English are on the losing side but never when it is the French.Good book, lack of professionalism.

    5. This history would have been much more interesting if the author had profiled the participants. As it is, it was still informative & well-told.

    6. A good reminder of an era I haven't studied in about 25 years. A bit too much military detail perhaps and could have benefited from more social history.

    7. Pen & Sword Ltd is, per its website, “…one of the UK’s leading military history publishers.” Many of its titles cover those Greek and Roman heroes usually known only to classical history students. Whether these titles break new ground or just rehash Polybius, Livy, Plutarch and the others remains to be seen.The company is not confined to the classics. When was the last time you read an account of the War of the Spanish Succession? The whole war, that is, not just accounts by David Ch [...]

    8. Excellent potted history of the Spanish Succession, while it provides good overall coverage of the war and politics it doesn't get bogged down in the detail. Some of the background elements could be a bit more detailed but overall Faulkner provides a great overview of a complex and now little know war that had large ramifications for the world at large.

    9. For not knowing much about the period, this books goes a good job of educating the general reader about the causes and after effects of the War of Spanish Succession. The battles are covered in detail and the different royalty and their generals are also detailed. Good reference for the Lace War period.

    10. You aren't going to find many books dealing with this conflict as a whole. This is well researched and informative but often skimps on important details likes the tactical context of warfare in the age and Queen Anne's War (the North American component of the conflict) gets a grand total of about 3 paragraphs.

    11. Long but worthwhile This is a thorough and worthwhile examination of the outcome and timeline of the war of the Spanish succession. The book explained nicely why the war was fought and where it was fought.

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