The Blind Side

The Blind Side Ross Craddock was just the type to be murdered The new landlord of Craddock house he begins by giving eviction notice to his aunt Lucy He threatens the doorman with dismissal He makes a violent and u

  • Title: The Blind Side
  • Author: Patricia Wentworth
  • ISBN: 9780446356893
  • Page: 464
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Ross Craddock was just the type to be murdered The new landlord of Craddock house, he begins by giving eviction notice to his aunt Lucy He threatens the doorman with dismissal He makes a violent and unwelcome pass to his cousin Mavis He is vindictive and spiteful and ends up dead The suspects include Lee who may have walked in her sleep and killed him out of unconscioRoss Craddock was just the type to be murdered The new landlord of Craddock house, he begins by giving eviction notice to his aunt Lucy He threatens the doorman with dismissal He makes a violent and unwelcome pass to his cousin Mavis He is vindictive and spiteful and ends up dead The suspects include Lee who may have walked in her sleep and killed him out of unconscious fear Or Peter who may have found Ross advances to Mavis unbearable Or aunt Lucy who unexpectedly came back Or possibly Bobby who was still in love with Mavis and furious that she was seen with Ross The answer is yet another Wentworth twist.

    One thought on “The Blind Side”

    1. Not a Miss Silver, this features Inspector's Lamb and Abbott both of whom appear in the Miss Silver books. My only complaint was that I worked out whodunnit!

    2. In my teens I read The Gazebo, one of Wentworth's Miss Silver mysteries, and didn't get on with it. The result has been that I've missed decades of reading Wentworth's work, as I discovered on reading her Danger Point a year or so ago. At some point I really must have a blitz on her books, because if anything I enjoyed The Blind Side even more than Danger Point.(I'm confused by one thing, though. Here and elsewhere the novel's referred to as "Ernest Lamb #1." In fact, Inspector Lamb, although th [...]

    3. Early Bird Books Deal | Some women writers of the time really didn't have a high opinion of other women, and it shows. | Just awful female characters in this one, I had little patience for any of them. Lucy is too obvious with her 'I've got a secret' hints from the very start, and the field of suspects is small enough to limit the suspense. It is, then, in every way a standard Wentworth mystery. Fluff, but comforting fluff, when you want something that's not taxing to spend an evening on.

    4. Written and set in the 20s or 30s in London, it definitely has the flavor and tone of books of the time. Including some language/descriptors that would be considered derogatory nowadays. The mystery was well crafted, but the characters were a bit predictable without a lot of depth. This is the first of a series; not sure I'll continue.

    5. This one was a mess! But then again, it's from 1939, which makes it one of her very first mysteries, and there's a reason I'm not bothering to reread the first few Miss Silver books. Not really recommended, and definitely not worth rereading. (Trust me on this, future self.)

    6. This was one of Wentworth's Inspector Lamb series (I believe there were 3). It is a competent mystery, but nothing special. Ross Craddock has taken over as landlord of Craddock House, an old mansion divided into apartments. He is a nasty, mean man and a user of women for his own advantage. When he is murdered, it doesn't come as a great surprise, but it does leave Inspector Lamb with an awful lot of suspects. And unfortunately, on the night the murder was done, it seems as if everyone inside the [...]

    7. This is an early Patricia Wentworth book, and not one of her best. A totally obnoxious man got himself murdered, and it seems that during the night of the murder his flat had been busier than Piccadilly Circus, with about half a dozen people traipsing in and out. What little tension the novel has seems to center on the fact that Lee, one of the main characters, fears that she might have committed the murder while sleepwalking. This implausible premise is made even more implausible by the idea th [...]

    8. Not my cup of tea. . . .I am a great fan of classic mysteries, and also a fan of period fiction written in the 1920's-40's. So, it would seem that this re-issue of a 1939 mystery would be right up my alley, but it wasn't. This is my second attempt to read Patricia Wentworth and I think my lack of enthusiasm is more for how she crafts her story than anything else.I like a novel that is character driven and she seems to write for the "puzzle solvers." Every teeny detail of her characters' movement [...]

    9. Craddock House was so full of squabblers, gossips, feuding family, and eavesdroppers that Ross Craddock's killer must have felt quite a home. There was Lee Fenton, Ross's first cousin, heard calling Ross "a swine" and subsequently sleepwalking (so she claimed) into the victim's flat. There was the lovable spinster aunt who Ross was cruelly evicting and who just happened to enter the house at 2:00 AM - in time to see a figure fleeing. And there was the beautiful blood-smudged Mavis Grey, quite ca [...]

    10. This isn't one of my favourites - the detectives seem unnecessary to the story and it feels like the entire story was written as one of the standalone books and then reframed around these detectives as they have no real impact on the plot and don't seem to be all that useful at investigating the murder. When reading the book I ended up resenting the time spent on the detectives sitting around talking about what they think of what they've been told when I KNOW there's something more interesting g [...]

    11. A tremendous relief to have an intelligent book after the last frightful piece of dross I read. This isn't the best mystery story in the world, but it's well and engagingly written with a fairly decent plot which has some nice mysteries in it. The characters are pretty good - it's supposed to be the first in a series about the police inspector, but I personally found the other characters more interesting. Nothing very startling in this book, but it's well done. (I suspect I might have given it t [...]

    12. This is the first book involving Lamb and Abbot as policemen. They are almost stock characters in this book but are fleshed out in later volumes. Like all good mysteries, the jerk gets murdered but he is so dreadful everyone in the apartment house is suspect. Published in 1938 it reflects the effects of the Depression more than the likelihood of war.

    13. Good book in the tradition of the 1940's-1930's. I like Miss Silver better, though. In the Miss Silver series, they constantly refer to The Case of the Poisoned Caterpillars, which I can't find. Does such a book exist? Help, please.

    14. I used to avoid the non-Miss Silver Patricia Wentworths, but it's so hard to find anything by her that I'm no longer a snob about it. The Blind Side is pretty good, plus it didn't have all those redundant paragraphs describing MIs Silver's sitting room and her hat.

    15. This seems to be one of Patricia Wentworth's earlier efforts before Miss Silver arrived on the London scene. It's a good whodunit in typical Wentworth style but perhaps not one of her best. Still very readable.

    16. Ce petit polar est envisageable sur une plage et/ou alors que vous êtes en train de bavarder et de surveiller d’un oeil les petits… Bref ne soyez pas surpris si sa lecture vous déçoit un tantinet.uncoindeblog.wordpress//?

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