The Late George Apley

The Late George Apley A modern classic restored to print the Pulitzer Prize winning novel that charts the diminishing fortunes of a distinguished Boston family in the early years of the th century Sweeping us into the in

Watch Live Capitol Viewing Ceremony for the Late George H days agoWatch the Capitol memorial service honoring the late President George H.W Bush on Monday evening, beginning at p.m EST The former president will lie in state in the Capitol rotunda as the Bush family, Vice President Mike Pence, The Late George Apley John P Marquand THE LATE GEORGE APLEY was John P Marquand s best selling novel and stayed on the best seller lists in the late s Kind of a tribute to a rather inconsequential Boston Brahmin, the book is definitely worth reading even today. Houstonians pay their respects to the late George H.W Houstonians pay their respects to the late George H.W Bush Back to Gallery Maria Lourdres Torres rushed home after work to say goodbye to a president With the sun setting overhead The Late George ___ crossword clue Below you will be able to find the answer to The Late George ___ crossword clue Our site contains over . million crossword clues in which you can find whatever clue you are looking for Our site contains over . million crossword clues in which you can find whatever clue you are looking for. The Late George Apley The Late George Apley is a novel by John Phillips Marquand It is a satire of Boston s upper class The title character is a Harvard educated WASP living on Beacon Hill in downtown Boston The book was acclaimed as the first serious work by Marquand, who had previously been known for his Mr Moto spy novels and other popular fiction. The Late George Apley Mar , The Late George Apley Approved h min Comedy March USA George and Catherine Apley of Boston lead a proper life in the proper social circle, as The Late George Apley film The Late George Apley is a film about a stuffy, upper class Bostonian who is forced to adjust to a changing world It starred Ronald Colman in the title role and was based on John P Marquand s novel of the same name and the subsequent play by Marquand and George S Kaufman. Darts and Laurels for the Late George H.W Bush Podcast Dec , Also discussed Last week s huge volume of news on all things Mueller Trump Russia, the multi administration follies of Government Motors, the technologic inadequacies of certain podcast Former Wyoming Sen Alan Simpson remembers the late George days agoBILLINGS Former Wyoming Sen Alan Simpson, a colleague and longtime friend of George and Barbara Bush, will be one of four speakers to deliver the eulogy at the late president s funeral Wednesday.

  • Title: The Late George Apley
  • Author: John P. Marquand
  • ISBN: 9780316735674
  • Page: 126
  • Format: Paperback
  • A modern classic restored to print the Pulitzer Prize winning novel that charts the diminishing fortunes of a distinguished Boston family in the early years of the 20th century Sweeping us into the inner sanctum of Boston society, into the Beacon Hill town houses and exclusive private clubs where only the city s wealthiest and most powerful congregate, the novel givesA modern classic restored to print the Pulitzer Prize winning novel that charts the diminishing fortunes of a distinguished Boston family in the early years of the 20th century Sweeping us into the inner sanctum of Boston society, into the Beacon Hill town houses and exclusive private clubs where only the city s wealthiest and most powerful congregate, the novel gives us through the story of one family and its patriarch, the recently deceased George Apley the portrait of an entire society in transition Gently satirical and rich with drama, the novel moves from the Gilded Age to the Great Depression as it projects George Apley s world and subtly reveals a life in which success and accomplishment mask disappointment and regret, a life of extreme and enviable privilege that is nonetheless an imperfect life.

    One thought on “The Late George Apley”

    1. This winner of the 1938 Pulitzer prize for fiction is a gently satirical and sociologically savvy portrait of George Apley, a Boston Brahmin born in the years immediately after the American Civil War. He is rich and wellborn, the product of a haughty and insular culture, yet he wins the reader's admiration by growing--incrementally, authentically--into a man able to face the challenges of the 20th century.

    2. I tried to read this when I was in my twenties, thought it was the most boring thing I'd ever read. Now, in my eighties, I give it five stars. (Should be four and a half, but doesn't seem to do things in halves) Does this book venerate the upper classes (esp Bostonian), or does it mock them? A little of each? I'd have to read more Marquand before I could check in on that. I laughed. Almost every page, I laughed. Surely this is an exercise in reading between the lines. And yet, the passages when [...]

    3. Boy, did this book deserve the Pulitzer Prize (late 1930s). It is a picture of Boston society in the early 1900s. George Apley is the patriarch of an old family. The book is a social satire and written to picture society in transition -- but I was very sympathetic to George, liking him very much. His sense of duty was greater than his 'love of life,' but I see that as rather noble. I saw a wealthy class, very exclusive and ingrown, but they looked out for each other and also provided for the 're [...]

    4. This book is meant to have us question our values, confront our traditions, and reexamine conventional views in an effort to sort out that which is still good and challenge that which is, classist, racist, elitist, or simply ignorant. It does this by revealing the life of the late George Apley, a Bostonian at the turn of the 19th/20th century. George believed himself to be a good and responsible man, a leading citizen, a philanthropist, a dutiful husband, and father. Within this fiction (both th [...]

    5. Why doesn't the Library of America have a volume of John P Marquand novels? I remembered The Late George Apley as a very good book and this re-reading 50 years later confirms that. First-rate and not included in the definitive collection of American authors. That should be fixed.

    6. Now THIS is an old paperback(rescued of course) - 1944 - and in pretty good shape. Pocket Books' 258th selection and first printed in the same year. I'll start today/tonight.Read the "intro" last night. This book is a novel masquerading as a biography/memoir.Got into it a bit last night and I have to say that I like this book a lot. The overall tone is a bit detached and Bostonian, but there are plenty of chuckles and also a bit of abrupt sadness as well. It seems to be a spot-on accounting of [...]

    7. The subtitle for THE LATE GEORGE APLEY is A NOVEL IN THE FORM OF A MEMOIR, and so, rather than a traditional, and likely less effective, approach, author John Marquand makes use of supposed correspondence between the main character and his family and of public records to tell the biography of George Apley, a member of Boston aristocracy and Beacon Hill resident. The unnamed narrator, a professed friend of George's, gives a eulogy at one of the many clubs that George had been a member of--afterwa [...]

    8. I've never been a huge fan of biographies. So it was to my extreme dismay (!) that I discovered The Late George Apley, winner of the 1938 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, was a fictionalized biography. Not to worry though, I ended up loving it! The 'writer' (i.e. narrator) of this book is a man who was close friends with the late George Apley. When George dies, his children realize that they have never known him well, beyond the way they know him as a father. They asked the writer to prepare a biogra [...]

    9. Poor George Apley - part of him wants to follow his heart, and not care what the rest of the world thinks of his choices; unfortunately, a larger part of him feels safer - and more righteous - following the rules set down by the society he has grown up in - upper-class Boston at the end of the 19th century. In this very enclosed world, there's not much room for maneuvering, and George generally finds it more comfortable to just make the same choices his ancestors have made,all in the name of doi [...]

    10. This was a really good book. I loved the beginning,but as George got a little older, his snobbishness (which he and his friends defiantly refused to acknowledge, and to quote Shakespeare, they protested too much)was annoying and overwhelming. The "do what is best for the family" attitude and don't try to be different advice he gave to his children was amusing, even though it was annoying as well, but integral to the portrait of George Apley. Keeping all gossip in the closet (which according to M [...]

    11. He dies in the end. Meanwhile, it made me feel like a voyeuristic Jew reading the life of a Bostonian aristocrat: I have always been faced from childhood by the obligation of convention, and all of these conventions have been made bu others, formed from the fabric of the past. In some way these have stepped in between me and life. I had to realize that they were designed to do just that promote stability and inheritance.

    12. This was on the staff pick table at the library, and since it was about Boston, I picked it up.Can't tell you how much I enjoyed it. The portrait of the persons, place, and times were of great interest to me, and the prose was both accessible and erudite.I will look for the author's other books.

    13. This was one of my top ten books of all time. I can't believe that this writer has mostly been forgotten. His sardonic wit and damning satirical viewpoint was remarkable. I feel like I have been the recipient of Mr. Apley's letters and I feel the same sort of pity that many characters in the book felt. It was brilliant. I loved it.

    14. Why this ever won a Pulitzer I don't know. Humor so subtle and out of my sphere of reference as to pass right by this midwesterner. There was a movie made in the 1940's and the reviews of that are great -- I recommend renting it instead of reading the book.

    15. I tried reading this as a young man, many years ago. In discussing it with a friend, he suggested that since I was more mature, I might now enjoy it. He was right.

    16. My copy is from the International Collectors Library, circa 1973, based on the 1937 manuscript and hard bound, 303 pages.Bottom Line First: The late George Apley subtitled "A Novel in the Form of a Memoir," is a novel narrated by a longtime friend and local author Willing. It came as a surprise to me that this is considered a satire. There is at least one obviously funny chapter and throughout an under tone of drollery. If by satire you mean laugh out loud funny, this novel rarely made me smile. [...]

    17. George Apley is one of the "minor classics" of the early 20th century. It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1938 but has slipped into obscurity. For me, it was a fascinating glimpse into the world of the Boston Brahmins and the Yankees throughout New England who prospered from hard work and ingenuity. It is described as a satire and it does, indeed, point out the foibles and pretensions of these Yankees who descended from the Puritans and became captains of New England industry. It is gentle satire, how [...]

    18. Have you ever wanted to read 350 pages about a rich socialite who defines himself and his family as a higher class than society as a whole? Me neither, but I have now! The protagonist has not aged well, perhaps he would have been a sympathetic figure in the 1940’s but it’s hard for me to perceive him that way today. A good man with a strong sense of community it’s hard to escape the fact that he is a rich person with rich person problems. All that said there is a timeless quality to the bo [...]

    19. *3.75 stars."Yet, granted that her remark was poorly phrased, so that it was silly, the fact remains that it is worth while for anyone to have behind him a few generations of honest, hard-working ancestry" (27)."but one and all agreed to risk it on account on its mirth-provoking qualities" (81). *I love "mirth-provoking qualities.""The personalities that took partwere what leavened an otherwise dull loaf" (174)."My senses are stunned by gilded ostentation and shallowness" (213). *George reflects [...]

    20. This is the story of the changing social and political surroundings of Boston over the life of George Apley, a man in the upper class, from 1866-1933. It is written in memoir form as one of his friends, Willing, collecting his letters and laying them out on a timeline after his death to try to give a view of Apley as a man. It really gave me a feeling of what the climate was like in Boston and New England during the time when my grandpa was a young child. Although the characters and events were [...]

    21. Reminiscent of "The Age of Innocence" (without the romance) and of Mr. and Mrs. Bridge" (without the humor.) Fascinating because the narrator is telling his dear friend's life story-- and nearly always gets it wrong, because he can see it only through the narrow lens of their Bostonian social set. George is not an unsympathetic character, and I read on and on, rolling my eyes at the narrator's predictability and hoping that George would somehow break free from the constraints of his world. Does [...]

    22. This book is a good example of how each generation is suspicious of the following generation and reverent of the previous one. In the early twentieth century, George Apley feels his way of life is slowly eroding away. All the things for which has has sacrificed are changing. As he grows older he begins to doubt if his life has amounted to anything. The story is timeless as every generation goes through this. You hear it when ever a story begins with "When I was a child".

    23. Not something I would have picked up on my now but glad I did. I enjoyed the concept of telling the story through letters. Not necessarily original but still a new enough concept that it was enjoyable. It was fascinating to see the world through the eyes of an upper crust Bostonian during the early 1900's.

    24. This book was the Pulitzer prize-winning novel for 1938. The premise is to read the letters George Apley wrote in his life, thereby learning about George's life and the life of a wealthy Bostonian family in the late 1880's through early 1900's. I loved the writing and the concept. Lovely book!

    25. Getting tired of reading/hearing about self anointed people of privilege and their patronizing ways. This one, at least, did have a sense of humor about it.

    26. I tried to read this when I was in my twenties, thought it was the most boring thing I'd ever read. Now, in my eighties, I give it five stars. (Should be four and a half, but doesn't seem to do things in halves) Does this book venerate the upper classes (esp Bostonian), or does it mock them?

    27. "The Late George Apley" is an elegantly written and slyly subtle exploration of the Boston Brahmin worldview in the first third of the Twentieth Century. I found Marquand's unusual structure effective. George Apley is seen through four perspectives: the friend who is writing his extended obituary, Apley himself, his son, and implicitly lurking in the background, Marquand. It seems to me that their approval of Apley descends in the order I have written them. Marquand has done it the hard way: "sh [...]

    28. The Late George Apley is a nicely nuanced and sophisticated novel of social criticism which uses a microscope rather than a bludgeon. Written by John P. Marquand in 1937 and winning the Pulitzer Prize in fiction for 1938, I would certainly call it a minor-major American classic. Or possible a major-minor American classic.In fiction I like well-wrought characterization much more than eventful plot lines. I like the plot failures to be things like an unsuccessfully brewed cup of tea and the triump [...]

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