Boy With A Knife: A Story of Murder, Remorse, and a Prisoner's Fight for Justice

Boy With A Knife A Story of Murder Remorse and a Prisoner s Fight for Justice Nearly a quarter of a million youth are tried sentenced or imprisoned as adults every year across the United States On any given day ten thousand youth are detained or incarcerated in adult jails a

  • Title: Boy With A Knife: A Story of Murder, Remorse, and a Prisoner's Fight for Justice
  • Author: Jean Trounstine
  • ISBN: 9781632460240
  • Page: 428
  • Format: Paperback
  • Nearly a quarter of a million youth are tried, sentenced, or imprisoned as adults every year across the United States On any given day, ten thousand youth are detained or incarcerated in adult jails and prisons.Putting a human face to these sobering statistics, Boy With A Knife tells the story of Karter Kane Reed, who, at the age of sixteen, was sentenced to life in an adNearly a quarter of a million youth are tried, sentenced, or imprisoned as adults every year across the United States On any given day, ten thousand youth are detained or incarcerated in adult jails and prisons.Putting a human face to these sobering statistics, Boy With A Knife tells the story of Karter Kane Reed, who, at the age of sixteen, was sentenced to life in an adult prison for a murder he committed in 1993 in a high school classroom Twenty years later, in 2013, he became one of the few men in Massachusetts to sue the Parole Board and win his freedom.The emotional and devastating narrative takes us step by step through Karter s crime, trial, punishment, and survival in prison, as well as his readjustment into regular society In addition to being a powerful portrayal of one boy trying to come to terms with the consequences of his tragic actions, Boy With A Knife is also a searing critique of the practice of sentencing youth to adult prisons, providing a wake up call on how we must change the laws in this country that allow children to be sentenced as adults.

    One thought on “Boy With A Knife: A Story of Murder, Remorse, and a Prisoner's Fight for Justice”

    1. I wrote this book and have been a participant of Good Reads for a while. I do suggest people read the book before making judgments. It is a book about juvenile justice; it is narrative non-fiction; it tells a story and puts it in a larger context to show how kids can changeBut I will share a letter I received that gave it a 5* review:"I vividly remember going to school the day of the stabbing and being floored by the rumors. I remember going home that night to be completely consumed by the news, [...]

    2. This is a toughie to rate. I've been aware of Jean Trounstine since I first dipped into the literature regarding prison education, and a program she helped initiate, Changing Lives Through Literature, has always championed my perception of the value of transformation through reading. I had heard some of the scandal associated with this book's pub date and residual anger from the victim's community, but I felt prepared to read this book objectively. I regret to say I felt the first half of the bo [...]

    3. BOY WITH A KNIFE: A SHORT OF MURDER, REMORSE, AND A PRISONER'S FIGHT FOR JUSTICEWritten by Jean Trounstine2016; 264 Pages (Ig Publishing)Genre: true crime, prisons, justice system, american(I received an ARC from the EDELWEISS)RATING: 2.5 STARS"Nearly a quarter of a million youth are tried, sentenced, or imprisoned as adults every year across the United States. On any given day, ten thousand youth are detained or incarcerated in adult jails and prisons.Putting a human face to these sobering stat [...]

    4. I was excited to learn more about this situation, however, it was so one-sided and biased. The author did not allow the reader to form any opinions since she constantly pushed hers on us. I stopped reading the book because I was so frustrated with the nonlinear story telling, terrible grammar, and general poor writing.

    5. Boy With A Knife by Jean Trounstine is a book about the justice system and its problems told through the lens of one particular case. This is not, as some irrational people who think revenge is justice and so post low ratings without reading or even considering what the book is actually about, about clearing Reed or anything of the sort. So ignore those self-righteous people and decide whether you want to read it based on the reviews from people who read it and aren't either too close to the cas [...]

    6. Whether, and how much, you will like this book depends on what you expect it to be. If you are expecting an informed and persuasive discussion of the practice of trying and incarcerating juvenile offenders as adult criminals, as the publisher's description led me to expect, you will be very disappointed; if I were to rate it based on its analysis of the relevant legal issues, I would give it 2 stars at best. On the other hand, if you want to read a sympathetic portrayal of the experiences of one [...]

    7. Very Inspirational, Highly Recommended Jean Trounstine will be speaking at The Mercantile Library, Cincinnati and I read her excellent book in preparation for the presentation. This follows Michelle Alexander's recent presentation on "The New Jim Crow," which is essential reading on the injustices of the U.S. criminal justice system which has decimated black communities in our country.The "Boy With A Knife" is Karter Reed, a 16 year old Caucasian boy, who is charged with first-degree murder of a [...]

    8. Though I moved away from Dartmouth, MA some years ago, I did attend Dartmouth High School and (Class of 1981) and recall reading about this tragedy. It would be hard to say I "liked" the book as it deals with some very difficult issues (teenage incarceration, murder, justice, punishment), but I will say it is an important book to read. No one, including Karter, would diminish the severity of the incident or the imperative to accept the consequences of one's actions. However, when do the conseque [...]

    9. Karter ReedI am from the area that Karter's crime took place. For that reason alone I decided to read this book. It was very informational and heartbreaking for everyone involved. While reading this I had the opportunity to speak to someone working within the DOC and what is so troubling to me is that beliefs and opinions are so different. I am reminded of the story "there is your side of the story, their side of the story, and the truth." I do believe everyone should be entitled to a second cha [...]

    10. Boy with a Knife is an important addition to the literature of juvenile justice. By focusing on the life of one young man, from his life before his crime, through his reintegration into society after his release from prison, Jean Trounstine is able to examine the inner workings of every aspect of the system, from arrest through parole, while at the same time, humanizing the children caught up in the system. My detailed thoughts are here: uplcchicago/boywithaknife/ Anyone with an interest in our [...]

    11. This is a clearly written, well conceived treatise on the sad state of the juvenile justice system. The book is made more readable by following Karter Reed, a teenager convicted of 2nd degree murder (rightly) and sentenced to life without parole. At each stage, as he moves from prison to prison, to parole, back to prison and finally out of jail on lifelong parole, the author widens the discussion to the many ways the system fails young offenders like Karter.This book should be required reading f [...]

    12. DO NOT READ THIS TRASH!This "innocent boy" showed NO remorse after the stabbing - even laughing and joking how he's going to be famous. You're trying to justify his actions? And then releasing the book on the ANNIVERSARY OF JASON'S DEATH? Are you SICK? The family didn't even know about this either. Disgusting.

    13. I read this book shortly after finishing a juvenile justice class. The book did a great job of summing up a lot of what I learned in the class, but it also added a personal element. I was completely absorbed in Karter's story. I thought the author did a great job weaving the story while also informing the reader of all the issues juvenile justice has faced and continues to face.

    14. growing up in dartmouth/new bedford, i had an emotional tie to this. when asking my parents, they remember the day this happened. hearing street names and areas i recognize was incredibly surreal. it rlly gives u a good and riveting perspective on criminals, what they're capable of, and who they truly are.

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