The Way to Start a Day

The Way to Start a Day Beautiful paintings highlight a text depicting the ways various peoples from around the world welcome the sun and the start of a new day

  • Title: The Way to Start a Day
  • Author: Byrd Baylor
  • ISBN: 9780684156514
  • Page: 201
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Beautiful paintings highlight a text depicting the ways various peoples from around the world welcome the sun and the start of a new day.

    One thought on “The Way to Start a Day”

    1. Nice title, very '70s drawings, but this volume works best for those who are comfortable in or exploring the native or traditional or earth religions from around the world. While the Bible celebrates the beginning of a new day with the rising of the sun, the sun itself, rather than an object of worship or communion, joins in the worship of its Creator.

    2. Peter Parnall collaborated with Byrd Baylor on eight more books, two more of which he won Caldecott honors for, in addition to this one in 1979. I have been in love with his artwork for awhile, and owned another of his books as a kid, called "Apricot ABC." For his complete bibliography of illustrated books, see this website: parnallgebooks/. The author grew up in the Southwest and lives near the Arizona-Mexico border. This book, written in free-verse poetry, is about sunrises and how many cultur [...]

    3. While probably not entirely historically accurate, I did like the idea that despite our differences in time, place and culture, there are things that tie us togetherr instance greeting a new day with a song, blessing or prayer. I also liked the reminder that greeting a new day is something to celebrate, to appreciate and give thanks for. I do wish there were an author's note that contained more information about various cultures' practices and an included bibliography. The artwork is simple but [...]

    4. We all can greet the day, praise the sun, and support the living earth. "A morning needs to be sung to. A new day needs to be honored."Gorgeously depicted, brilliantly told, This 1979 Caldecott winner awakens the spirit of renewal and reminds me that a new day is a one-time event. Celebrate it!

    5. Another beautiful and beautifully illustrated book. This Caldecott-honor book is another gem. Read this with your children and, together, discover YOUR way to start a day!

    6. A good kid's book with little tidbits about different religions and cultures without ever actually mentioning them. Just their reflections on the sun.

    7. Genre: Historical Fiction Grade:3-5This book tells of different ways to greet the Sun. I liked the illustrations in this book they are filled with radiant colors that the sun has when it rises and sets. Its extremely beautiful and lifelike. The book is a cool way to look at the culture of others and how they greet the sun. It takes a look at the past and talks about the Aztecs and Egyptians. This is a really cool book.

    8. This historical non-fiction picture book explains different cultures and how they celebrate the sun rising. This book features many abstract illustrations that really help the reader think about the meaning and traditions of other cultures. This book can help students understand the difference in cultures and accept that everyone is different and thinks differently.

    9. • 1979 Caldecott Honor Book •I had that song, "I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing" stuck in my head when I started reading this book. It just screams 1970s! I love it. The message is really lovely, and the art isn't to my taste, but it's really unique and different and goes well with the text. Materials used: unlisted Typeface used: unlisted

    10. With a nice 70's feel, I would have been okay with this if it was about one culture or person greeting the sun each day. Instead, it felt almost like a religious text, which I didn't care for. It was almost a book about sun-worship, a theme which I do not prefer.

    11. Poetry is paired with super sparse illustrations that remind me of the illustrations dentists used to have in their office.

    12. Psychedelic Caldecott honor book from the 70's about the ways in which various peoples greet the new day. "The way to start a day is this: Go outside and face the east and greet the sun with some kind of blessing or chant or song that you made yourself and keep for early morning." That's not how I start the day. Certainly not on days I have to go to work. In this time of year it's still dark outside when I have to catch my train. And when it's light outside the chances of seeing the sun are pret [...]

    13. What's the opposite of racism?This is one of Byrd Baylor's bizarre maudlin nature prose-poem books that goes on forever about how awesome native people are, and how much better it was in ancient times when people worshiped the sun and gave it gifts. It talks about different cultures that either worshiped the sun or performed morning rituals because that's kind of like worshiping the sun.Byrd Baylor just kind of annoys me. Her books are just full of glorification of and romanticization of ancient [...]

    14. Caldecott Honor picture book. A vaguely pagan ode to the sunrise. And kind of beautiful and just the littlest bit weird. Not exactly the kind of story book you want to read if you are never planning on being around to sing the sunrise up. Kind of cool though.

    15. The Way to Start a Day is an uplifting book about the way Native cultures around the world celebrate the rising of the sun. This book explores the joy of the sun and sky. There are many ideas on how to respect and enjoy the rising sun. The Way to Start a Day gives a look into an aspect of nature.The images in this book use a wide variety of bright color in an abstract manner to represent the rising sun and the celebrations that take place. The main color used, though, is yellow. The bright yello [...]

    16. On an artistic level, I really enjoyed this book. It's such a lovely idea to write a book all about contemplating the beauty of the sun and how different people around the world and throughout history have honored it. The pictures are beautiful, and it's beautifully written. However, the fact is that you can't talk about cross-cultural sun worship practices entirely in that tone. It's downright dishonest. My favorite example is the page where it talks about how people used to offer flowers and s [...]

    17. The story line of this book was very interesting. It gave a plethora of examples about how people have been "singing to the sun" for centuries and in different cultures as well. It basically translates to appreciating the sun and the fact that they are alive for another day. This is great to read to your kids to show them how it is important to appreciate every day and go out to greet the sun with a blessing, chant or song. One thing I did not like while reading this book was the words were prin [...]

    18. This book suggests that the reader should start each day by facing East and singing what is in their heart to the sun. It's nice how it tells how different people with different backgrounds all start the day out right: by offering prayers, blessings, songs to the sun. The illustrations have a distinct Native American influence though different pages show different cultural influences. For example, there was a Buddha and Egyptian depictions. Each page followed the same soft color palette. Quick r [...]

    19. This picture book is written as a lyric poem celebrating the Native American experience of waking early and greeting the sun with a blessing, chant, or song. The poem is descriptive and focuses on images and scenes of people around the world rising with the sun to allow it to fill them with the feeling of a voice from within. Baylor equates singing with the sun as a connection with one’s ancestral past. Parnall’s illustrations use thin black line and deep, earthy colors that sweep, flow, and [...]

    20. This book tells the way to start a day by singing a song to the sun every morning. It tells of different geographical places traditions in giving offerings to the sun each morning to help it have a good one-day life. I would say the themes are traditions of different areas. I could use this in my classroom for a geography/history lesson. I could discuss the countries mentioned in the book and talk about their different traditions such as holidays. For example, I could talk about their wintertime [...]

    21. I just can't give Byrd Baylor and Peter Parnall's books anything but 5 stars, because with every read I feel my entire body slow down and think about enjoying the beauty of the day around us. With this book I thought of my own rushed morning practices, and how sorry that I am that I don't take the time to greet the day and be thankful for another day of life. Byrd and Peter have so much to teach, and each of their books takes us further on a path in which we can be at one with nature.

    22. I liked how the illustrations in this book blended two pictures together and were brightly colored. The text for this picture book was a little less then inspiring, I thought the author had a good idea, but the follow-through just wasn't as I would have hoped. A decent little book, but probably not something I would recommend.*Taken from my book reviews blog: reviewsatmse/2008

    23. I feel this could be a wonderful book for children to start a whole new day in a happy state of mind. It refers to others around the world inlcuding Japan, Egypt, or Arizona and how cavemen and cavewomen wake up to sing to the sun each and every day. It exaplins that the sun needs to be sung to in order to be happy as well. It is a fun way to learn different things about each of those different areas or learn more details of each area.

    24. In poetic text, this book reflects on the various ways people start the day in countries all over the world. I like the concept, but the strange illustrations unsettled me. They were too abstract for me, and I had a hard time making sense of them. The writing, too, seemed cryptic and weird, and I’m not sure kids really relate to the idea of going out and singing to the sun first thing in the morning.

    25. 1979 Caldecott Honor - Favorite Illustration: The last page of the sunrise with the brilliant pink, orange, and blue colors.A beautiful book about various cultures and the tradition of greeting the sun each morning. It reminds me of the way religious people often begin the day by reading scriptures or praying. I do think that the best way to start the day is by thinking of it as a new day, and stopping to enjoy the beauty and wonder of a fresh start.

    26. The book gives ways ancient peoples started their days and how they greet the sun. I was pleased to see Peru mentioned since I was just there and saw sun temples ruins. "Didn't they chant at dawn in the sun temples of Peru?" writes Byrd Baylor. We can ask younger readers how they begin their day. I would have to say mine begins with prayer.

    27. The illustrations in this book were very worthy of the Caldecott medal. They were very different, and very beautiful and eye catching. The story was okay. It had a variety of cultures represented which I liked, but I felt like it was a bit confusing at times. I had to read it three or four times to really enjoy it. Still, a creative book all around.

    28. This text was interesting in that it connects the stories of cultures across the world and across time. The illustrator used lines to make a connection from page to page. I like that it recognizes the role of the sunrise in life, however, I felt it strange that it seemed to encourage a prayer to the sun. I agree with a prayer at the beginning of the day, but not directed at the sun.

    29. I LOVE THIS ONE! Read to Justin tonight right after Night and the Candlemaker. They are really great combo for kids to hear before bed. We read them when Justin was younger but still at 10 years old he likes being reminded every once and again about remaining in light and being thankful every day for it.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *