Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts: Lesson Plans for Librarians

Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts Lesson Plans for Librarians Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts Lesson Plans for Librarians is a collection designed by instruction librarians to promote critical thinking and engaged learning It provides teaching l

  • Title: Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts: Lesson Plans for Librarians
  • Author: Patricia Bravender Hazel McClure Gayle Schaub
  • ISBN: 9780838987711
  • Page: 399
  • Format: Paperback
  • Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts Lesson Plans for Librarians is a collection designed by instruction librarians to promote critical thinking and engaged learning It provides teaching librarians detailed, ready to use, and easily adaptable lesson ideas to help students understand and be transformed by information literacy threshold concepts The lessons inTeaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts Lesson Plans for Librarians is a collection designed by instruction librarians to promote critical thinking and engaged learning It provides teaching librarians detailed, ready to use, and easily adaptable lesson ideas to help students understand and be transformed by information literacy threshold concepts The lessons in this book, created by teaching librarians across the country, are categorized according to the six information literacy frames identified in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education 2015 This volume offers concrete and specific ways of teaching the threshold concepts that are central to the ACRL Framework and is suitable for all types of academic libraries, high school libraries, as well as a pedagogical tool for library and information schools.

    One thought on “Teaching Information Literacy Threshold Concepts: Lesson Plans for Librarians”

    1. This book has detailed lesson plans for librarians on a variety of information literacy concepts, but most of the activities require 50 to 60 minutes, which isn't feasible for those of us planning one-shot sessions. The book did have some good sample scripts and assignments, but most of the book was too impractical to be applied to my everyday work.

    2. A good marriage of theory and practical application. I liked all the different lesson plans and would like to incorporate them in their various formats whenever I get the opportunity. Downside: this book is $70. Really ACRL? Do you have a discount somewhere?Thank goodness my library has a copy!

    3. The way this book is organized, I'm not really finished with this book. However, I've read enough to give my opinion which is that this book is extremely helpful and I am so glad I purchased it. Those interested in library instruction will love this book, as well.

    4. In terms of library science, this is an excellent book. I rarely give 4 stars to any book; but in this case, it is actually informative and useful. Nevertheless, it still does not compare to books written for entertainment. Bravender and her co-authors were clearly writing a book to help other librarians with practical examples from the mind-boggling complex new ALA Information Literacy Framework. Bravender is mercifully cognizant of the fact that many librarians are confused about the framework [...]

    5. The strength of this book is the detailed and practical nature of the lesson plans, which include handouts and specific examples to kick-start the sessions. However, many of the lessons were close to an hour in length, with all but a few taking longer than 30 minutes. As a librarian in an environment where the "one shot" session still reigns, a range of interchangeable, bite-sized lessons would make the book more useful in the day-to-day. Still, I used quite a few sticky notes to mark passages i [...]

    6. I can't say enough how wonderful this book is at explaining active learning techniques that can be applied directly to library instruction. Whether it's a one-shot or a series of classes, this book has practical, real-world, and relevant (sometimes pop-culture) examples that are engaging for students. The authors also provide a packet of pdf worksheets on the ACRL website for use in the classroom.

    7. Some very helpful tips for librarians navigating how to use the Framework in their instruction. As an early career info lit librarian, I often find the framework more theoretical than practical - but this book links threshold concepts with specific lesson plans and tools to use in the classroom. This title is one that I will refer back to for ideas again and again.

    8. very practical title. I would recommend it for any librarian who wants to see how the Framework can be incorporated in a practical way. A few of my favorite activities included the role of blogs in scholarly conversation, flawed questions as tools for inquiry and tracing information over time. Check it out and use it!!!!

    9. This is definitely a book I want to keep nearby. I appreciated the numerous lesson plans and handouts. Very practical.

    10. Some great ideas but wish there were more examples of what can be done in very large one shot class settings.

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