Schools on Trial: How Freedom and Creativity Can Fix Our Educational Malpractice

Schools on Trial How Freedom and Creativity Can Fix Our Educational Malpractice Schools on Trial is an all in attack on the American way of education and a hopeful blueprint for change by one of the most passionate and certainly youngest writers on this subject Are America s scho

  • Title: Schools on Trial: How Freedom and Creativity Can Fix Our Educational Malpractice
  • Author: Nikhil Goyal
  • ISBN: 9780385540124
  • Page: 485
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Schools on Trial is an all in attack on the American way of education and a hopeful blueprint for change by one of the most passionate and certainly youngest writers on this subject Are America s schools little than cinder block gulags that spawn vicious cliques and bullying, negate creativity and true learning, and squelch curiosity in their inmates, um, students NSchools on Trial is an all in attack on the American way of education and a hopeful blueprint for change by one of the most passionate and certainly youngest writers on this subject Are America s schools little than cinder block gulags that spawn vicious cliques and bullying, negate creativity and true learning, and squelch curiosity in their inmates, um, students Nikhil Goyal a journalist and activist all of twenty years old, whom The Washington Post has dubbed a future education secretary and Forbes has named to its 30 Under 30 list definitely thinks so In this book he both offers a scathing indictment of our teach to the test while killing the spirit educational assembly line and maps out a path for all of our schools to harness children s natural aptitude for learning by creating an atmosphere conducive to freedom and creativity He prescribes an inspiring educational future that is thoroughly democratic and experiential, and one that utilizes the entire community as a classroom.

    One thought on “Schools on Trial: How Freedom and Creativity Can Fix Our Educational Malpractice”

    1. “…our schools should strip away every element that they are known for: grades, tests, compulsory classes, periods, bells, age segregation, and homework. And then we should craft institutions that are grounded in the attributes we want to see in citizens in our society and designed to foster critical thinking and lifelong learning.”Twenty-year-old Nikhil Goyal is not wrong: America’s education system is indeed in shambles. It is possible for students to learn without a constant barrage of [...]

    2. This is the complete review as it appears at my blog dedicated to reading, writing (no 'rithmatic!), movies, & TV. Blog reviews often contain links which are not reproduced here, nor will updates or modifications to the blog review be replicated here. Graphic and children's reviews on the blog typically feature two or three images from the book's interior, which are not reproduced here.Note that I don't really do stars. To me a book is either worth reading or it isn't. I can't rate it three- [...]

    3. Key words in this dreadful "take down" of the American education system: "Some," "most," "many."Goyal calls himself an autodidact (always amusing for someone who went through traditional schooling to claim he/she got there "completely on my own"). He writes like one. His argument is a mess of tangled scholarship mixed with quotations from polemics and incendiary claims meant only to convince those who find schooling "boring." He relies on "scholarship" and "research," never mentioning that Educa [...]

    4. Read the full review here: newberyandbeyond/arc-round*Note: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.I really, really wanted to love this book. Goyal discusses the state of American schools today (a topic you know I care about), and he offers innovative solutions to the problems that they face. However, I really took issue with the way the author presented his arguments and opinions. He has an untempered anger toward schools, and while I don’t doubt that he and many [...]

    5. Schools on Trial is a book that is close to my belief about Education in General. It's a system that you need to learn to leverage or get out of it asap.In the book Schools on Trial talks about personal experiences as well as students that the author interviewed. The book is loaded with research, quotes and real information.If you ever wondered why your smart child comes to you and says, "I don't want to go to school today" read this book and then give it to them to read as well. Once you have d [...]

    6. As with at least one other reviewer, I really wanted to like this book. Nikhil has genuine concerns about education, and his writing is at its best when reflecting on innovative schools he has personally visited. But I found several parts of the book to be tedious--cobbled together research and loosely-connected quotes talking around and about a topic but leaving me with the distinct impression that he was up against a deadline and ready to be done with it. "Schools on Trial" lacks a consistent [...]

    7. Goyal does not beat around the bush, resulting in a book that is not an easy pill to swallow, but questions many of the ingrained traditions of the education system, arguing that education must be and can be done better.This book talks about various models of education that exist in small pockets around the US, arguing that scaling these non-traditional models of education (summerhill, sudbury, etc) to be accessible to more students will be better for our students.

    8. A good critique of the modern public school system, though with some bias (which you can read around). You won't look at education the same again.

    9. Urban teacher here, with feelings about crap written by a punk snowflake 20-year-old without classroom teaching experience. 1. INTERVIEW ACTUAL TEACHERS BEFORE WRITING A BOOK ABOUT PUBLIC EDUCATION. Seriously, what is with these writers who love education but hate teachers? Don't smarmily call out "malpractice" of the practitioners of your topic without engaging them or asking for data. 2. Personal annecdotes =/= DATA. Again, the NEA or any other teacher organization is happy to provide data. Th [...]

    10. I won this book a year ago through First Reads. I put off reading it because I had just read several books about education and I feared the book would be overly hostile and attack teachers as so many critiques of education do. I had a difficult time getting through the introduction, as it was very intense. If it wasn't for needing to review it, I might have stopped reading there. I'm glad I kept reading. I learned a lot about the history of education and the possibilities of education being appr [...]

    11. This book is an eye opener even for a homeschooling mom like myself. It makes me very sad to see how incarceration, I mean schools, came into being. I am surprised there isn't more bullying and push back from students than there already is. When you lock them up in a building for 7-8 hours a day and they have to have permission to do everything from talking to using the bathroom, what should we expect? Would you like to be treated this way?I know I am blessed to teach my kids at home, and that s [...]

    12. Are our public schools failing due to neglect and corruption or are they failing because their design is fundamentally flawed and damaging? This is the question at the center of Nikhil Goyal's Schools on Trial. Through detailed and exhaustive research, he explores the history of America's public schooling and it's shortcomings at the conceptual level. There is a lot of negativity in the beginning (i.e. if schools are set up the same as prisons, how can we hold children responsible for resorting [...]

    13. Schools on Trial was a disappointment as Nikhil Goyal blames the school system but ignores facts and figures. He cities schools that are not public which means that they do not have to keep students who do not want to learn. Nikhil Goyal says that schools are not places of learning but where bullying is common place and are closer to gulags. He does not have proof. His answer is to be kinder encourage creativity and things will be better. I disagree maybe he needs to understand that schools shou [...]

    14. Schools on Trial examines the status of our educational system and the alternatives that can perhaps breathe new life into our pedagogical institutions or replace them altogether. An inspiring and informative glimpse at the flaws of standardized education and the necessity for children's freedom to take command of their own education.

    15. This books is a shout for help by all the teachers and students in the world who have suffer from the educational system. I think this book should be read for every school administrator, parents and students. I believe that society should advocate for a better school system and what better way to do it by at least being informed about it.

    16. Written from the author's perspective (which doesn't negate the meaning), but his research is mostly newspaper articles and/or small statistical sample sizes. I agree with the sentiment, but felt the research could be stronger.

    17. Some interesting thoughts, but it is oversimplified and I question some of the connections since it is mostly a personal look with not a lot of context.

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