Anung's Journey: An ancient Ojibway legend as told by Steve Fobister

Anung s Journey An ancient Ojibway legend as told by Steve Fobister This ancient Ojibway legend predates contact with European settlers but the people he meets at the end of his journey couldn t be familiar to modern culture This book is a Top Indie Novel for Youn

  • Title: Anung's Journey: An ancient Ojibway legend as told by Steve Fobister
  • Author: Carl Nordgren Brita Wolf
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 202
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • This ancient Ojibway legend predates contact with European settlers, but the people he meets at the end of his journey couldn t be familiar to modern culture This book is a Top 10 Indie Novel for Young Adults When the orphaned Anung sets out on his vision quest, he sees clearly that his purpose in life is to find the greatest chief of all and tell him of the many acThis ancient Ojibway legend predates contact with European settlers, but the people he meets at the end of his journey couldn t be familiar to modern culture This book is a Top 10 Indie Novel for Young Adults When the orphaned Anung sets out on his vision quest, he sees clearly that his purpose in life is to find the greatest chief of all and tell him of the many acts of kindness the mothers and fathers of the village have given to Anung When the people of his village learn of the vision, they are proud of him For every man of the village loves Anung as his son Every woman is his mother They believe Gitche Manitou, the great creator, has chosen their son for a special journey In his quest to find the greatest chief, Anung meets many of the tribes of the First Nations Along the way, he is accompanied by Turtle, the interpreter of all languages He finds friends in the most unlikely of places a squirrel s nest, a mother bear s den, and a city filled with people from every tribe At each stop, Anung plays his drum and sings of his mothers and fathers and his quest to meet the greatest chief What Anung finds at the end of his journey will both surprise and thrill readers of all ages This ancient legend, told in the beautifully poetic style of Carl Nordgren, begs to be read aloud and savored.This book has been embraced by the Museum of Ojibwa Culture in St Ignace Michigan The Director of the Museum, Shirley Sorrell, calls Nordgren a master storyteller and invited him to launch the book at their museum, located in the center of the Ojibwa universe And financial proceeds from sales of the book will be shared with the people of Grassy Narrows Reserve in Ontario.

    One thought on “Anung's Journey: An ancient Ojibway legend as told by Steve Fobister”

    1. If the "greatest chief" of the First Nations people is Jesus, this cannot be called an "ancient" Ojibway story. The first thing that caught my eye was the "as told by" part of the title. There are a lot of books published by non-Native writers books in which the non-Native authors tells a story that was told to them by a Native person. There's some excellent critical discussion of that kind of book.Second thing is the word "legend" in the title. People of any given faith don't call their traditi [...]

    2. This could be a great book and if I ripped out the last few pages in my opinion it would be still a great book. The author Carl Nordgren tells his friend Steve Fobister’s story; Steve is an Anishinaabe Indian. When Steve was a young boy he discovered Santa in an Eaton’s mail order catalogue. He decorated a tree thinking that Santa would come and bring him gifts. The disappointing experience that that did not happen is told in a sweet loving way every reader will be able to associate with. St [...]

    3. Someone else summed it up brilliantly in their review: this could be a great book if you tear the last view pages out. It's a story within a story, telling of how Anung went on a great journey, travelling through the lands of different tribes, meeting different spirits and people, having a few adventures on the way. It's interesting and shows the beliefs of the Native people (view spoiler)[and then it turns out that the "greatest leader of all the people" Anung is going to see is the baby Jesus [...]

    4. I don't know how to reviewed this book. It's a story between stories and the author wrote it based on Steve Fobister's story, who was became the Chief of First Nation Grassy Narrows Ojibway. And what the book told is the story that Steve's grandfather ever told, about the journey of an Indian young boy named Anung (means Morning Star, his former name was Blue Sky) as the tradition of his village to prayed to Gitche Manitou. This should be an entertaining story, but I dunno I can't connected much [...]

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