Occidentalism in Turkey: Questions of Modernity and National Identity in Turkish Radio Broadcasting

Occidentalism in Turkey Questions of Modernity and National Identity in Turkish Radio Broadcasting From the early Attaturk years Turkish radio broadcasting was seen as a great hope for sealing the national identity of the new Turkish Republic Since the inaugural broadcast in the national eli

  • Title: Occidentalism in Turkey: Questions of Modernity and National Identity in Turkish Radio Broadcasting
  • Author: Meltem Ahıska
  • ISBN: 9781845116538
  • Page: 252
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From the early Attaturk years, Turkish radio broadcasting was seen as a great hope for sealing the national identity of the new Turkish Republic Since the inaugural broadcast in 1927, the national elite designed radio broadcasting to represent the voice of a nation Here Meltem Ahiska reveals how radio broadcasting actually showed Turkey s uncertainty over its positionFrom the early Attaturk years, Turkish radio broadcasting was seen as a great hope for sealing the national identity of the new Turkish Republic Since the inaugural broadcast in 1927, the national elite designed radio broadcasting to represent the voice of a nation Here Meltem Ahiska reveals how radio broadcasting actually showed Turkey s uncertainty over its position in relation to Europe While the national elite wanted to build their own Turkish identity, at the same time they desired recognition from Europe that Turkey was now a Westernized modern country Ahiska shows how these tensions played out over the radio in the conflicting depictions and discrepancies between the national elite and the people, cosmopolitan Istanbul and national Ankara, and men and women especially in Radio drama Through radio broadcasting we can see how Occidentalism dictated the Turkish Republic s early history and shaped how modern Turkey saw itself.

    One thought on “Occidentalism in Turkey: Questions of Modernity and National Identity in Turkish Radio Broadcasting”

    1. I will be honest, I haven't finished this book. Yet I think the book fails to deliver its initial promise of new theorizing on Turkish modernization and Westernization. It doesn't provide novel arguments on the Turkish nation-building project other than introducing "Occidentalism" as an operational new concept. Yet, again it is an interesting case study with an intriguing new data. And the introduction serves as a good literature review of the field.

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