Dolina Issy

Dolina Issy Thomas the child protagonist of The Issa Valley is subject to both the contradictions of nature in this severe northern setting and sometimes enchanting sometimes brutal timbre of village life Ther

  • Title: Dolina Issy
  • Author: Czesław Miłosz
  • ISBN: 830800685X
  • Page: 164
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Thomas, the child protagonist of The Issa Valley, is subject to both the contradictions of nature in this severe northern setting and sometimes enchanting, sometimes brutal timbre of village life There are the deep pine and spruce forests, the grouse and the deer, and the hunter s gun There is Magdalena, the beautiful mistress of the village priest, whose suicide unleashThomas, the child protagonist of The Issa Valley, is subject to both the contradictions of nature in this severe northern setting and sometimes enchanting, sometimes brutal timbre of village life There are the deep pine and spruce forests, the grouse and the deer, and the hunter s gun There is Magdalena, the beautiful mistress of the village priest, whose suicide unleashes her ghost to haunt the parish There are also the loving grandparents with whom Thomas lives, who provide a balance of the not quite Dostoevskian devils that visit the villagers In the end, Thomas is severed from his childhood and the Issa River, and leaves prepared for adventures beyond his valley Poetic and richly imagined, The Issa Valley is a masterful work of fiction from one of our greatest living poets.

    One thought on “Dolina Issy”

    1. Although I have made no systematic study of the matter, I must ask myself once again why it is that poetry written by novelists invariably triggers my gag reflex, whereas novels written by poets are well worth reading? With no particular effort the names Dickey, Kinnell, Carlos Williams, Cummings, Bobrowski, Rilke, Daumal, Soupault and now Miłosz come to mind - poets who have written novels that were at least enjoyable and, in some cases, much more than that. I don't know (though I has me suspi [...]

    2. What else was there to say? He had been born, he would die, and he would have to bear his burden. Priest or rabbi- it was the same old rigmarole, never getting to the heart of it Now, if a giant head were to peer out from behind the horizon and huff and puff and suck up everything in one furious rush of air But nothing doing. So why should he be sore at the Jew? He was just a man, no better and no worse But show me the man who could do something. A man could have his guts torn apart, could ache [...]

    3. Description: Thomas, the child-protagonist of The Issa Valley, is subject to both the contradictions of nature in this severe northern setting and sometimes enchanting, sometimes brutal timbre of village life. There are the deep pine and spruce forests, the grouse and the deer, and the hunter's gun. There is Magdalena, the beautiful mistress of the village priest, whose suicide unleashes her ghost to haunt the parish. There are also the loving grandparents with whom Thomas lives, who provide a b [...]

    4. Children are much richer than the grownups – they have two worlds before them – one is the world of their own and the other is the world of the adults. The Issa Valley is a story of a boy living in his world of a child and his vigorous wish to understand an adult world and to belong there – his envy and his partial disappointment in the life of grownups. It is a very contemplative and affluent in imagery coming of age tale.

    5. A sample of Milosz's writing is far better than any review I could come up with."Tinkling bells, a snorting horse, the sleigh-runner's noiseless glide, and a white landscape embroidered with tracks. The wobbly square denoted a hare: the elongated one, a hare on the run. A fox track - neatly aligned, one paw behind the other - ran straight up a knoll, up to where the snow scintillated in the sun, before disappearing in a birch wood bathed in violet. Bird tracks were the easiest to spot: three ove [...]

    6. Read this years ago, soon after Milosz was given the Nobel. I remember walking along the corridor at University and passing by the door of his office at the Faculty.

    7. Ο Τσέσλαβ Μίλος ήταν ποιητής, κι αυτό φαίνεται πεντακάθαρα από τη γραφή της Κοιλάδας του Ίσσα. Μόνο ένας (πραγματικά καλός) ποιητής θα έβλεπε τα πράγματα από τόσο απρόσμενες γωνίες. Σ' αυτό το βιβλίο πρωταγωνιστής είναι η ίδια η Κοιλάδα του Ίσσα. Οι άνθρωποί της, αλλά όχι μόνο [...]

    8. Beauty punctuated with sinister moments A novel/memoir about a vanished world, written by a noble, vanished mind, in a deep, poetic, even wasteful prose style that itself has been chased from our own shallow, practical, efficient approach to the world. A novel about a remote corner of Europe, before the Waste Land set in. For we who live in the Waste Land, this sort of vision may seem almost embarrassingly nostalgic and foreign. But Milosz's vision is strikingly anti-sentimental; a profound refl [...]

    9. I have probably read some six thousand books in my life -- I can still relate this incredible novel almost page by page.

    10. First, I have to praise the wonderful translation of Mr. Louis Iribarne. It's not easy to translate someone like Milosz. It is amazing how novels written by poets are still good when the contrary is, in most cases, totally opposite. Milosz's novel is a joy to read, funny, thougthful and full of memorable characters and situations. Somewhat slow pacing, the novel follows the childhood of Thomas until the age of 14, spent amongst the villages of the Issa Valley, in Lithuanian territory. Poland's r [...]

    11. Milosz's writing is beautifully elegant and poetic. There are passages that enthralled me and held my interest because of the language that Milosz uses to convey the enchanting landscape and the sensations that the land and the people bring to the protagonist, Thomas (my favorite one is the last one, covering the last 2 or 3 pages of the novel). I enjoyed learning about an area of the world of which I knew little before reading this book. I like that Milosz weaves stories of Polish and Lithuania [...]

    12. Gyönyörű könyv, nagy küzdelem.Majdnem olyan nehezen haladtam vele, mint annak idején a Kalevalával. És szerintem van köztük hasonlóság. Hideg táj, vidéken, táj, táj, táj, és emberek mint a táj szerves része. Erdő, széna, fa, mókus, halál, születés, küzdés, öröm, vízpart és fekete kenyér. Egy gyerekkor, egy világ összegzése, teljes egész. Fekete István Csend című könyve jutott az eszembe, meg mintha Fekete István úgy általában is, csak eddig tőle még [...]

    13. Tame atlase nebuvo nei Ginių, nei kitų gretimų vietovių, ir dėl to nederėjo kam nors priekaištauti, bet Tomas galvojo apie žemėlapius apskritai, apie tai, jog prispaudi pirštu kokį nors taškelį, o ten, po pirštu, yra girios, laukai, keliai, kaimai, juda galybė žmonių, iš kurių kiekvienas kuo nors ypatingas, išsiskiriantis iš kitų. Pakeli pirštą - ir nieko nėra. Ir lygiai kaip bažnyčioje, kai jis jausdavo pagundą pakilti į orą ir iš aukštai stebėti klūpojančius [...]

    14. The Issa Valley contains a wonderful connection of anecdotes and stories about village life in Eastern Poland and Lithuanian during the interwar period. It has the charm and sunny mood that reminds one of Alphonse Daudets delightful collection about Arles, Lettres de Mon Moulin. Unfortunately, I think Daudet possesses a greater skill that allows his book to touch readers lacking personal familiarity with the region. Milosz's book will be a great delight to those who know Lithuania. Add two stars [...]

    15. Jag är inte jätteintresserad av den här typen av romantiska skildringar av pojkars uppväxt, och den här var inget undantag. Språket är vackert och den är på det stora hela bra, men berättelsen är rörig och lite osammanhängande och till slut blev det för långtråkigt. Jag läste bara halva.

    16. The Issa Valley is a tense place, but most of this tension boils about a mile below its surface, where devils dressed like Immanuel Kant reside. Occasional silliness excluded, the goings are really slow here. Yet Czeslaw Milosz's prose is pristine, subtle, gorgeous -- serene, as somebody says on the back cover. And it is serene, so much so that it might rock you to sleep. But with a writer as talented as Milosz rocking the cradle, is this such a bad thing? Certainly not, so long as you wouldn't [...]

    17. Están a loucura e os demos, as serpes de auga, a dúbida xuvenil sobre a fe, os conflitos identitarios (afirmárense polacos en contexto liturano).Permite acompañar o crecemento dun neno, explicando con detalle a vida do val. Introdúcese no retrato das persoas, dos costumes, da relixión, dos acontecementos. É tamén un retrato de familia.Volverei.

    18. Kai skaitai knygą, tiesiog atsiranda tokių akimirkų kai privalai sustoti ir skirti laiko pamąstymui, žvelgiant pro langą, o tada tiesiog supranti, kad knyga kurią skaitai yra tiesiog nuostabi. Ypač rekomenduoju žmonėms kurie vaikystėje susidūrė su gamta, kurie prisimena vaikiškas tiesas, nekaltumą ir tyrumą. Tiems, kurie dar galvoja, jog nėra sugadinti pasaulio

    19. Pulitzer-prize winner, Czeslow Milosz writes lyrical prose about his coming-of-age experiences in the beauty of the natural setting of his home town in Lithuania at the turn of the 20th century. Interspersed by mythological and philosophical musings, this book will uplift your spirit and satify your sensibilitiesI loved it.

    20. Slow and subtle prose, beautifully written at times but lacking in an overarching plot. Still a joy to read.

    21. Úžasná kniha. Ať nikdo nečeká nějaké sladké vzpomínání na dětství. Tohle je kniha trochu jiného druhu.

    22. I read this book long time ago and I remember just a few things about it. What I do remember is that it was a great book.

    23. A wonderfully told story of a boy growing up in the Issa Valley by a fantastic writer. The poetic imagery is beautiful and is so realistic that I suspect that this is based on Milosz own boyhood.

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