The Man in a Hurry

The Man in a Hurry A feverish classic from one of the modern masters of French prose No one can keep up with Pierre Niox the speediest antiques dealer in Paris although not necessarily the most competent As he dashes

  • Title: The Man in a Hurry
  • Author: Paul Morand Euan Cameron
  • ISBN: 9781782270973
  • Page: 184
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A feverish classic from one of the modern masters of French prose.No one can keep up with Pierre Niox, the speediest antiques dealer in Paris, although not necessarily the most competent As he dashes about at a dizzying pace, his impatience becomes too much to bear for those around him his manservant, his only friend and even his cat abandon him He begins to find that wA feverish classic from one of the modern masters of French prose.No one can keep up with Pierre Niox, the speediest antiques dealer in Paris, although not necessarily the most competent As he dashes about at a dizzying pace, his impatience becomes too much to bear for those around him his manservant, his only friend and even his cat abandon him He begins to find that while he is racing through life, it is passing him by However, when he falls in love with the languid, unpunctual Hedwige, the man in a hurry has to learn how to slow down

    One thought on “The Man in a Hurry”

    1. You often hear that the modern world is too fast, that everything is travelling at breakneck speed without a chance to pause, to relax and to take in your surroundings. What if your experience is the opposite? What if as far as you are concerned the world is going too slow & that all your dealings with it could/should be done far quicker, so that you could move on to the next thing, before your patience, or boredom levels reach crisis point.The Man in a Hurry, tells the story of Parisian ant [...]

    2. First published in 1941, acclaimed French author Paul Morand’s short but compelling novel has an intriguing resonance for today’s world. It’s the story of Pierre Niox, a busy Paris antiques dealer, who just can’t stop living life at top speed. As he dashes about at a dizzying pace, he alienates all those around him, until even his cat abandons him. His efforts to save time at every possible opportunity becomes ultimately ridiculous, and it is only after meeting and marrying the indolent [...]

    3. 3.5 starsFor me, this book was just okay. I never really got into the main character. He just basically made me tired and bored.I thought after his marriage he had slowed down and that he had become normal, but then it wasn't long and he was back to his original ways. I didn't like the ending, but what else in his condition could he have done? He did the right thing.I would like to to thank Pushkin Press and Net Galley for allowing me the opportunity to read and review this e-galley in exchange [...]

    4. As if Italo Svevo had written A La Recherché du Temps Perdu, A Man in a Hurry is by turns hilarious yet philosophic look at one man's life. More ironical than Proust, less beautifully written in general- although there are some stunningly good metaphors here and there- the success of the book rests on its ability to turn from hilarity to poignancy in a matter of half a paragraph. A great character study, a great book.

    5. L'homme pressé bien qu'ayant été écrit entre Septembre 1940 et Mars 1941 correspond bien à l'époque actuelle,époque dans laquelle nous vivons.Le personnage de Pierre nous ressemble tous, dans notre frénesie et dans notre volonté à vouloir gagner du temps tout le temps.Il met en avant l'individualisme du personnage qui à force de vouloir éviter de gaspiller son temps en vient à perdre ses amis et sa femme A lire en prenant son temps

    6. Pierre Niox is ‘The Man in a Hurry’. He is an antiques dealer who races through life and is certainly not one to stop and smell the roses. That is until he meets Hedwige de Boisrosé , from a family whose laid back lifestyle is the antithesis of Niox’s.The book has a feel of Noel Coward wit about it through the very clever use of prose that delivers humour with a choice use of words. Take for example the narrative of Niox’s driving, ‘Orly airport tilts back, Ris-Orangis rears up, Melun [...]

    7. I was given a free copy of this book by Netgallery for an honest review. The book was an English translation of the original.Bearing in mind this book was first published in 1941, you have to forgive the use of language that is no longer politically correct. You also have to shove aside the sexism, insofar as the women in the book were written about as if they were all strange, unknown creatures, who are all alike in habits and actions. The writing was quite unusual to start with, but the book w [...]

    8. Thank you to NetGalley and Pushkin Press for the free advance download of The Man in a Hurry by Paul Morand. Pierre is a man in a hurry. He multitasks and finds shortcuts in every aspect of his life so as not to waste a second of time. He meets Hedwige and falls in love, but of course she likes to take life at her leisure. After the two marry Hedwige and her family seem to temper Pierre for a while; then Hedwige is with child. She separates from Pierre in order to get some peace. Pierre goes on [...]

    9. 3.5/4 I found the main character in this book to be equally amusing and annoying. He is always in a rush wherever he goes for no particular reason. One of my favorite moments is when he asks his best friend to grab the gas can in the back of the car and lean out to refill the tank while they are driving- just to save 10 minutes. He also has some clueless moments where he suggests that one of the characters have her baby at 7 months instead of 9 to save time. Sometimes I found his actions comedic [...]

    10. Extraordinary. One of the best books I ever read (and I read many).You could really feel (at least in French version) in the writing the heart beat, the urge to live.

    11. A solid story, though hard to overlook Morand’s Vichy allegiance. Add to that the fact that this book, published in 1941, includes a Jewish doctor who pops up for paternal advice from time to time as he tries to escape France. His plight is written with dispassion; his fate, unknown. I haven’t read much European literature from this era, but the red car on the cover caught my eye. And now I know who Paul Morand is…

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